got chaps?

jklingel Posted By jklingel, Nov 18, 2007 at 7:20 PM

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  1. jklingel

    jklingel
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    Oct 23, 2007
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    I sure do.... now... and feel like an idiot. After running a saw a few hundred hrs, my day arrived. Thankfully the saw was not running at WOT when it hit, but it still went through cover-alls and jeans in a flash. It is rather sickening to hear/feel/watch the saw stop on your leg. Welcome to Chain Saws, Scene One, Act One. Only needed 8 stitches; very lucky. Bought nylon "one-hit" chaps (all they had) and a helmet/face mask on the way to the doc's, and will order some 6-layer kevlar/poly chaps from Labonville. May also order a pair (or 3!) of kevlar socks. Getting nervous now.... It is always interesting how people react when the probability of an accident goes from .001 to 1.0. Ahhh, some people's kids....
     
  2. GeeWizMan

    GeeWizMan
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    Nov 29, 2006
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    Wow! That is really scary. I have been using a chain saw for 20 plus years with no accidents at all. Just this spring I bought some safety gear, helmet-mask, boots, chaps. I am glad I did after hearing your story. I am happy you are 100%, you are right?

    George
     
  3. jklingel

    jklingel
    Feeling the Heat 2.
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    Oct 23, 2007
    279
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    I am fine, thanks. Just a wound and a bruised ego; the scar will be a reminder. God, and I taught shop and preached SAFETY! My dad dragged a saw down his forehead/nose once, resulting in about 18 stitches. A neighbor dragged one over his mouth and down his throat way out in the Bush; by the time the Army chopper got him to the hospital, the doc said he was within an hour of meeting God face to face. An old surveying boss had an employee take 4" out of his thigh out in the twigs several years ago. How many stories do I have to hear before I engage my brain??? Four, I guess.
     
  4. wahoowad

    wahoowad
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    Dec 19, 2005
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    An old platoon Sergeant once said "It's not a matter of If, but When...."

    And of course he was proven correct.
     
  5. LarryD

    LarryD
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    Oct 28, 2007
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    That is a drag to hear that. Glad to hear it wasn't worse than it was. Listen to your Dr. Keep it clean. Chainsaw cuts almost always result in a pretty good infection.

    A little advice on chaps. If you are going to make the investment, and I'm glad you did, there are a few things you should keep in mind.

    They should cover from your hip to your ankle.
    Warp knitt nylon is far more effective than Kevlar. The tecnology stalls the saw. Kevlar is somewhat cut resistant when new. Once they are used and have oil, pine pitch and sweat exposed to them they are far less effective. (read:not effective at all).
    Wrap chaps are preferred. Wrap chaps encircle the calve. If the saw hits an apron style it tugs it out of the way and cuts your exposed leg!
    Wash your chaps fairly often. I use to wash mine once a month. When I worked in the field they were used daily. The action of washing and drying fluffs them up and they are more effective. Don't add any soap to the machine, there is generally enough residual in a machine to get them clean. Snap all the snaps before you put them in the machine, they tend to break in the washer/dryer
    Once the cordura is cut they are junk. Once you start getting a lot of saw dust and so on in near the nylon they are useless.
    For the money chainsaw pants have even more warp knit nylon in them. They are a bit warm in July however.

    I have found that Husky wrap chaps seem to be the most durable and fit the greatest range of users. You certainly can buy decent stuff form Labonville.

    Larry D
     
  6. WILDSOURDOUGH

    WILDSOURDOUGH
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    Oct 11, 2007
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    jklingel- I am very happy to hear that the boo-boo was only minor (relativaly speaking).
    After the initial pain goes away- the embarrissmant will linger... which is a good thing.
    How many times have we (I) 'preached' safety- and then gone out and cut, scraped, burned something.
    Fortunally, nothing broken or stiched yet- I usually find the accident happens when I have worn myself out (tired)-
    toward the end of the day.
    Thank you for the post- It (safety) just has to be drilled and drilled into us, and we must remember to practice it.

    You need to stick around (In one piece)- please.
     
  7. titan

    titan
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    Mar 30, 2007
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    A timely post for sure-glad to hear your injury was minor.I finally broke down and bought myself a pair of Stihl saw pants this summer,they are the ones that catch the chain and stall the motor....they are hot as a bugger but offer full protection front and back.I looked at chaps as well but the full pants seemed like a safer bet...I hope I never get to test their efficacy.
     
  8. Gene K.

    Gene K.
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    Oct 16, 2007
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    My father once cut himself on the leg with a chainsaw while handling it improperly to remove a stump. The silly man tried to wrap it and hide it from my mother, which didn't work to well. Fortunately, it was minor cut, like yours, but it came with embarrassment. Likewise, my hand brushed the edge of my axe once, and since I keep my axes razor sharp (and I mean sharp enough to use in lieu of a scalpel), I have a small scar on the back of my hand. My wife still doesn't let me forget about it's cause.

    The moral of the story is what you painfully, albeit lightly, encountered: safety is absolutely paramount. Failing safety with any equipment will inevitably meet with injury or trajedy. It's good when we share these stories, because it reinforces the value of the safety in a more pleasant way than "hey, Joe Blow hasn't been on the forum for a while. I wonder why?" only to have the question answered by another forum member who perused the obituaries.

     
  9. carpniels

    carpniels
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Dec 6, 2005
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    Loc:
    Rome, NY, USA
    Hi Klingel,

    Sorry to hear this happened. Glad to hear you are still alive. Hope you learned a lesson and that many other might learn a lesson from you and get theirs too.
    I have the full wrap husky pants (gift from a pro tree cutter) and they are really nice. I love them, although they are hot. They also help convince others that you are not just some guy with a chainsaw, but take things seriously. Helps to convince them to give you their wood and cut it on their property.

    Carpniels

    PS. as a joke to lighten the mood: In Dutch the word 'Klungel' is a jack of all trades and master of none. I guess you almost qualify :) :) :)

    Good luck and be safe (from now on).
     
  10. jklingel

    jklingel
    Feeling the Heat 2.
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    Oct 23, 2007
    279
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    Loc:
    Fairbanks
    •• As a matter of fact, that fits me pretty well. Or, as I like to refer to myself, "Jack O$#, all trades." I get by, though. "Klingel" is German for "bell". Yes, I am a ding-a-ling.

    LARRYD: I was just going to research chaps, wondering why people are going away from Kevlar and if these "one hit" chaps are the way to go. Now I know. Yes, I was planning on getting at least the chaps w/ ankle wraps, and now I know why they are better. Maybe those full pants (and jacket, and helmet, gloves, and socks....) are even better. I wonder if anyone sells Michelin Man suits....
    Thanks to all for the info and good wishes; there's nothing like Brotherhood. j
     
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