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hardibacker board fireproof?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by stovepipe?, Jan 29, 2006.

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  1. stovepipe?

    stovepipe? New Member

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    can it be a surface that single wall pipe passes though with, say, 3 inches of clearance around the pipe? as I understand it, the stuff is cement and sand (so far so good) with some fibers and additives (hmmmmm).

    thoughts?

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  2. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    I certainly prefer Hardibacker for tile floors.

    But, for hearth applications, I would stick with cement board.
  3. Sundeep Arole

    Sundeep Arole New Member

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    I just cut some cement board (durock) not to long ago and was a bit surprised to find it is bonded together using what looks like nylon lath. If that is indeed the case (someone on the board can confirm), i doubt it is
    fire resistant. I would think naively that the nylon would melt and the board would then just come apart. Hardibacker might work, though, it does not seem to have this nylon reinforcement.

    Of course you could always take a plumber's torch to a scrap sheet of this stuff and do your own flamability test. Won't give you a definitive answer, but should give you a pretty good idea. I quickly determined using this method that fiberglass insulation was not acceptable. Neither was the foil backed insulation board (which the stove store sold me saying that is what they use for covering the damper area after putting a insert!)
  4. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    Experience only here, not official!!!

    I used a peice of Wonderboard (cement board) as a shield placed in the doorway of my stove while cleaning the glass. Used only when there was very little embers left like at beginning of the day. The board would get very hot, and after a while the fibers were getting quite brown and smelled. So, I'd say No, it's not fireproof, but resistant. My problems were solved by covering the piece with aluminum foil. now it doesn't get hot at all.

    If using it this way, I would be careful and check local building codes or call Durock or wonderboard for their official word on this.
  5. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    I dont think you want to pass single wall pipe through anything. Better safe then sorry,
    Ryan
  6. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    I said I would not use Hardi because when I cut it, and I have cut alot of it, it has a hard-carboard type consistancy with lots a fibre dust.

    Durock, cuts like loose cement... and it does have fiber glass reinforcment bedded in.
  7. nrmahoney@cox.net

    nrmahoney@cox.net Member

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    This is from the Hardi web site on the 1/4" board

    Non-Combustibility
    HARDIBACKER ceramic tile backerboard is recognized for use in non-combustible construction in NER-405.


    Surface Burning Characteristics
    When tested in accordance with ASTM test method E-84:


    Flame Spread 0
    Fuel Contributed 0
    Smoke Developed 5



    Thermal Resistance
    (Approximate value) 1/4" thick: R:0.13
  8. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    one has to ask if it is non combustiable how does it develope smoke

    Flame Spread 0
    Fuel Contributed 0
    Smoke Developed 5
  9. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    I'm with mountainstoveguy. Single wall pipe shouldn't be passed through anything. No part of it should ever be concealed. What exactly are you doing?
  10. stovepipe?

    stovepipe? New Member

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    basically the single wall pipe passes though a thimble bricked out from the masonry chimney. the chimney is interior and was closed in by plaster wall on all sides with framing aroun it. to do it (make the header, brick out the thimble, etc) I had to take down the plaster wall on one side. So I want to replace the wall, all clearances to stove, veritcal run of pipe, etc are fine. The surface of the bricked out area is 1 inch sunken from the original wall surface. I will replace plaster with either hardibackerboard and skimcoat it, or perlite-mixed plaster on wire lath. nothing will come in contact with the pipe, its just a matter of how close I can get. 2 inches? 10 inches? the larger the clearance, the bigger the collar I have to put on it to cover the gap, the sillier it looks. don't want to do anything dangerous, just thught that if it is the equivalent of masonry, there's no reason that it can't have the same/somewhat less proximity to the pipe as the brick. but if it smokes, then it must not be. thoughts one this or alternative set-ups?

    also, any good suggestions for finding collars of various sizes online? thanks
  11. Mike Wilson

    Mike Wilson New Member

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    It contains wood fibers interspersed in the cement medium. As a result, while it won't burn, it should smoulder.

    Don't use it.
  12. nrmahoney@cox.net

    nrmahoney@cox.net Member

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    you need Selkirk DSP6/WT Product code 256463 If you google "Selkirk 256463" you will get the catalog scroll down to page 6.
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