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Heading north - Morso in a yurt

Post in 'The Inglenook' started by begreen, Nov 1, 2008.

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  1. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I'm heading out in a few minutes to help install a Morso 2110 in a friend's yurt. This will be interesting. I'll take pictures and will have a report sometime tomorrow night. Weather is predicted to be rainy, so I hope we have a warm fire by tonight.

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  2. titan

    titan Minister of Fire

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    Hey Begreen;is that a cabincamp, or a full-time dwelling?
  3. cmonSTART

    cmonSTART Minister of Fire

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    Yurts are cool!! Too bad my wife isn't as enthused as I am....
  4. Redox

    Redox Minister of Fire

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    They kinda look like a gazebo with walls...

    Chris
  5. RedRanger

    RedRanger New Member

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    Looking at all the canvass, can only assume that the stove has to be in the centre where I can see some semblance of metal on that roof. Anyone else notice that?

    That damn BG--always keeping us in suspence :lol:
  6. relax

    relax New Member

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    I think it might be one of those super duper high speed altrasonic cripto wood dryers,,,
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Back now, mission accomplished. We slept in a warm and toasty yurt last night. Here are some shots of the process. The yurt is being used as a cabin right now. It has all the comforts of home, but without square corners. Sonny, on top there is a very large acrylic skylight. That is the dome you are seeing. These are nicely built locally and have a very special ambiance.
    http://www.rainieryurts.com/

    A lot of time was involved in cutting the lattice and creating a rigid, flat wall for the thimble. For the exterior we used a diamond-shaped, aluminum place. On the inside of the lattice, Loren made a nice rigid wood plate that we attached to the lattice to create a solid wall.

    Once the plates were bolted in place it was time to bolt up the flue. It's attached to a 22'high, fresh-cut hemlock pole that they set last weekend. This is just to get them through the winter. Next year they will put in steel pole set in concrete. It rained on and off, but fortunately, it wasn't so heavy as to make it miserable. By evening we were putting up the last section of pipe. Then the stove got set. We have it sitting on bricks on a sheet of titanium scrap and durock. This is so that critical measurements for the hearth could be done. Loren will be building the hearth this week

    The stove worked pretty well considering that the flue is only 12' and it was about 50 outside. As expected, draft was a little weak until the stove heated up. But it should be much better once temps drop. The owners had broken in the stove outside, so within an hour we had a raging fire and no paint smell. Few hours later it was a toasty 70 degrees inside. We spent the evening enjoying the beautiful light show and the nice warmth from this great little stove. It has an awesome secondary burn that seem to erupt from the bottom center and like a fountain flares up over the secondary manifold. I particularly like the built-in log-fence which looks like it will be an effective stop to prevent logs rolling into the front glass. The castings and quality of this stove are excellent. Once it heated up it liked to run at about 400 burning alder and got up to 450 burning holly.

    Attached Files:

  8. struggle

    struggle Minister of Fire

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    I once got to see inside a living yurt out in WY. on a snowmobile trip at Togwotee pass area. It was the first time I had ever seen anything like it. It had a wood stove in it but do not recall anything else about it other than I do remember seeing lattice on the wall like yours pictured does.
  9. d.n.f.

    d.n.f. New Member

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    I spent a week in a yurt while ski-touring one winter. Neat. It was heated by propane which sucked. Kind of a dampish warmth. Nothing would dry out.
    Woodstove would be the trick I think.
    So much nicer than living out of two man tent in the winter.
  10. sl7vk

    sl7vk New Member

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    Is that a 2110 in a Yurt!!!!!!

    If it is, that sucker is going to be a veritable sauna!

    That is a big stove for a small place. I understand the Yurt isn't insulated etc..... but jeez!
  11. InTheRockies

    InTheRockies New Member

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    Thanks for sharing the photos. I like the concept of yurts, it's interesting to see photos of them--that's a beautiful stove, too. I bought a standard stick-built, cheap, fixer-upper when I fled the east coast. If I decide to relocate even further into wilderness, a yurt with a nice wood stove might just be what I need and they're certainly affordable. Do your friends have any concerns about security, given the materials for walls? (Having lived in cities most of my life, I'm more paranoid about crime--if I were them, I'd be worried about coming back to the yurt and finding that beautiful stove missing.)
  12. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Or the bears had come in to sample the bacon.

    Some of our coastal campgrounds have converted "tent" sites into yurt sites. You pay a little extra, like 50$ total, and get the bunkbeds and electric lights and heat. Way better than a tent when it is raining, windy, and humid.
  13. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I was a little concerned about that too, but it isn't really an issue. The yurt is insulated, but we found the temps to be fairly easy to regulate. It never got over 72 even with 48 degree outside temps. They had been using a propane heaters and made the same comments. Nothing would dry out. With the wood stove it is so much more cozy and comfortable.
  14. struggle

    struggle Minister of Fire

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    Worry about the bears, That kind of reminds me of my mom when my folks came out snowmobiling with us in the dead of winter...............uh mom bears hibernate :cheese:
  15. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Bears are definitely more of a concern than theft. There are bears where this yurt is located, we've seen some good sized poops around. Hopefully they are well fed and with no food stored in the yurt there will be no reason for them to get curious. One fellow in a more remote area posted that he finally just left the door open on his yurt for the winter. He figured it was a lot cheaper and easier to clean up bear scat than keep repairing torn up yurt siding.
  16. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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  17. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    In our milder climate bears may sleep a lot, but they don't really hibernate.

    http://library.thinkquest.org/TQ0312800/bear.htm
  18. InTheRockies

    InTheRockies New Member

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    I certainly understand the concern about bears--I live between 2 black bear/grizzly bear habitats. Grizzlies can and do break into stick-built houses--they can get into anything. (I find it funny that hard-sided campers are deemed safer than tents--grizzlies can rip through them with one swipe of their massive paws, in fact, a couple of years ago one easily broke in to a camper and raided it for food, fortunately the humans were out at the time.) They keep relocating problem grizzlies to our area, which isn't too comforting--these bears have developed an attraction to human habitation for easy food sources. I'm thankful that they do hibernate, but they can come out of hibernation early if they didn't put on adequate fat reserves. I religiously avoid the forest in fall and early spring since the bears are in a frenzied eating mode (they're either just coming out of hibernation or getting ready to go into hibernation). Now, if the mountain lions just took a winter nap.
  19. jrousell

    jrousell New Member

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    sorry to hijack thsi thread.. but-- can you PM me some more info about that yurt-- I am very curious how they like it.. what they spent? advice... etc...
  20. Rich M

    Rich M New Member

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    A good friend has the exact same set up only his is the larger sized yurt and he has a small soapstone stove (sorry, I didn't see a brand on it). It works very well.
  21. Marty

    Marty Feeling the Heat

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    Next project: "Floor hatch for wood retrieval" Nice work.
  22. VTZJ

    VTZJ Member

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    Titanium scrap? Somebody has been plundering the Boeing dumpster is my guess! :lol:

    Beautiful install in a cool project with interesting friends...what could be better?
  23. woodconvert

    woodconvert Minister of Fire

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    That's what I was thinkin'......splain me again what's a centre? :p

    Anywho, I was watching a TV show where these people lived out in the boondoggles of Utah with a pack of wolves. When they were not doing wolf stuff they were shacked up in a yurt. Those look pretty damn cool i'd have to say. Not sure i'd like to test one out if I were not clearly at the top of the food chain though.....
  24. argus66

    argus66 Feeling the Heat

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    id like to live in one in a yurt if i buy land up north i think i may put one on it.
  25. greentea

    greentea New Member

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    Stayed in a number of yurts, or gers as they like to call them there, in Mongolia a few years back. They were all heated with wood stoves, didn't notice the make back then. They used dried camel dung which burned hot for a long long time.
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