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Hello, I am new here & have a few questions about pellet stoves.

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by JKooL, Aug 29, 2008.

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  1. JKooL

    JKooL New Member

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    Hello all, I stumbled across these forum while trying to find out some pellet stove info.

    To make a long story short....my mom is up there in age & on social security.

    Oil heat prices is killing her. ( As it is everyone) Her NEW budget is $475 a month!

    Anyway...I heard about the pellet stoves & was thing about getting one.

    Obviously, $ is a factor so I saw a summer heat at Lowes for $1299.00 or a Englander at Home Depot for $1700.

    I would prefer the cheaper one if it is decent.

    I don't know much at all about pellet stove except for the little I have been reading.

    Also, I heard it would be ok to put in the basement & let the heat rise through the basement door to heat the first floor. (I could also cut a vent in the floor if needed)

    The basement is used for doing wash & taking showers & has a bathroom. The first floor is 42' x 32' & is divided into an open kitchen (20' x 11'), living room (21' x 24'), small hall. (11' x 5' / the basement door comes up here) The rooms that have doors are a bathroom (9' x 6') & 2 small bedrooms (17' x 13' & 12' x 9').

    The basement is divided with a cinder block wall so it is half the normal size. The size is 29' x 24'

    There is one very small room on the 2nd floor which I use for my PC & entertainment room etc. ( 13' x 14')

    Will placing the stove in the basement be a wise choice?

    Any other input would also be greatly appreciated!

    Thank you in advance!

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  2. DiggerJim

    DiggerJim Feeling the Heat

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    They're differently branded versions of the same stoves made by Englander Stoves. Mike here on the board can fill you in on specifc model differences (if any).

    I'm not sure about your mother being able to manage one - you need to load them everyday or so and it's a 40lb bag of pellets. Is she going to be able to do that? Could she manage the weekly cleaning? (Probably, since I expect she grew up when everyone used wood or coal to heat with, but just asking.)
  3. JKooL

    JKooL New Member

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    I will be taking care of it for her.

    I am just wondering about placing it in the cellar or 1st floor?
  4. DiggerJim

    DiggerJim Feeling the Heat

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    I'd put it on the first floor. You'll get maximum heat for the places you live most - sounds like it's pretty open which will help warm the other rooms. Putting it downstairs & letting the heat rise is okay but it's going to have to be major hot in the basement or cool upstairs - harder to move the air just up the stairs & through the door.
  5. JKooL

    JKooL New Member

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    I was afraid you were going to say that.....The basement would be ideal (cement floor....can tap into the chiminy or out a side window)

    Upstairs I am going to have to figure out what to do about the venting & something to set it on.

    Plus....I am guessing the basement will be cold then too?
  6. GVA

    GVA Minister of Fire

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    2 things
    basement is a big heat sink
    and pellets in 40lb bags are not allways convenient to older people........... my parents fall into that catagory
  7. DiggerJim

    DiggerJim Feeling the Heat

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    Pellet stoves (as opposed to pellet furnaces) are space heaters. They heat best the space they're in -- space as in relatively unobstructed. Put it in the basement you're going to get some (but not a lot) of heat rising through the floors and some (more but still not nearly equivalent to what's in the basement) going up the "heat chimney" of your basement stairs. Overall a pretty inefficient way to move the heat. You can try to use fans to move the air for you but now it's getting complicated.

    On your first floor it sounds like you've got a relatively open design that is conducive to natural convection around the rooms. The one with the stove will still be warmest but the others can be comfortable without boiling out the stove room (which will reduce your pellet use). That heat will rise and help the 2nd floor but again, much like the basement/first floor transfer, it's not enormously efficient.

    So your options seem to be an easy install in the basement with a resulting hot as toast basement and cool rooms above...or a more difficult install on the first floor and be warm where you (and your mother) spend most of your awake time. The venting through a wall isn't too terribly difficult and a hearth pad to put it on is a $50ish project from Home Depot Durock & tile.
  8. JKooL

    JKooL New Member

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    Thank you. It seems to make simple sense.

    Looks like the first floor is what it is going to be.
  9. cntbill

    cntbill New Member

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    Joe,

    Sent you a PM, You can come over sometime and check out our setup a 55-SHP 10 in our basement
  10. packerfan

    packerfan Feeling the Heat

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    I'd just like to say that venting an Enlgander/Summers heat stove can be done pretty easy if you are capable of cutting holes in the wall of your house. If you don't think it is a job that you could do personally, maybe you have a friend that could help you out, or hire a local handyman. Vent kits for these stoves are readily available.
  11. natureboy

    natureboy New Member

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    I am also thinking of install in basement as wife cuts hair down there ( using elect heaters ) but I was hoping for heat rise upstais. Split level so basement steps are only 4 up into den ( approx 10 x 10 ) then another 4 up to main floor. If I do not see the heat rise as I would like I could cut a few floor registers to allow heat to rise. Alos looking for stove.. liked Bosca can save $ 500 by taking a 3 hr trip vs getting it locally. $ 2500 now my question is go with the Bosca or get Summers heat from Lowes ????

    :question:
  12. cntbill

    cntbill New Member

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    One thing you need to keep in mind with using registers is safety, at the moment I can't seem to think of the exact name but you should use a fire trap, a device that has a spring loaded door that would automatically close the register in case of a fire.

    As far as the Summers Heat stove, that is what I have and I am quite please with it, as it has kept our home warm with out any real problems. Also what model of the Summers Heat are you looking at and what is the total size of the area, your home you what to heat?

    Sorry don't have any knowledge on the Bosca. Some one else should pop in on that along with the proper name of the register trap, a little searching on the site should come up with that.
  13. natureboy

    natureboy New Member

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    thank you I will look into that register. I am also looking into snorkel vent as well as when I come out from foundation, I will be only 1ft off ground and need to bring up. I do not know how easy the stove is to install. I do know that one place wanted $400+ for the snorkel and abt $ 400 for the instal. I've jack hammered holed before for dry well and dryer vents so I know I can do that. I can also run the elect required. The only thing I do not know is how to vent as once I come out and up it will be against vinly siding.
    Summers Heat
    2200 Sq. Ft. Pellet Stove
    Model: 55-SHP22L this is the one Lowes has on website and I would have to find in store

    Obviously I should have done this in the summer as timing is poor right now with regard to availability.

    Saw the Bosca localy but I know I can get it $350 cheaper by taking a 3hr ride
  14. natnyer

    natnyer Member

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    I have a split level home with 3 levels. My pellet stove is in a corner in my Small finished basement area.The walls and ceiling are sheetrocked and only the walls are insulated. I have 7 steps up to my living room and another 7 steps up to my 3 bedroom, bath level.The heat does rise up the 2 stairwells very nicely.I like to sleep in a cooler area and the stove being on the lower level is perfect for us. I am very satisfied with the stove being in the basement.I don't think this would work well in a large unfinished basement, the concrete would soak up the heat like a sponge but because the 2x4 insulated walls cover the concrete in my basement the heat has no where to go but up.It does get hot downstairs but not unbearable and the rest of the house is very comfortable about 1700 square feet total all levels.This install is not for everyone but it works for us.If I sit on the lower level steps you can feel the cold air drop and while standing you can feel the hot air rise.The stairwells are also sheetrocked and insulated.Like I said I wouldn't do this for a large unfinished and uninsulated basement.The area the stove is in is only about 300 sq feet and 8 foot high.
  15. natureboy

    natureboy New Member

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    thank you. Sounds very similar to my set up as well. when you vented out, what was your clearance? Mine is only 1 ft above grade so I need to snorkle vent up. To save $$ I hope I can do instal myself. I've jackhammed vents thru foundation b4 ( drywell / dryer ) and I can run electric required. My unknown would be the outside vent, but it seems to be fairly uncomplicated.
    Kind Regards.
  16. cntbill

    cntbill New Member

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    As far as the installation of the exhaust vent it is quite simple. My setup is about 4" from the vinyl siding, minimum is 3" I believe, as long as you follow the manufactures directions you should have not problems. But you have to take into consideration the total run of the pipe as this determines the size that is required. My understanding is the maximum distance with 3" pipe is 15'. And to calculate the distance you need to use 3' for each elbow that you use. I think the way to determine distance is for every vertical foot equals 1', for each horizontal foot equals 2 feet with a maximum of run of 3' and as mentioned above each 90* elbow equals 3'.

    When I did my setup with 3" pipe I didn't know this and although I am only over the 15' by 5' or so I should have used 4" pipe and that would make my stove a bit more efficient. I hope to get my change over to 4" before the major part of the heating season done soon.

    And remember you need to be so many feet above the ground, ( I believe 5' ) manly so that a stray spark doesn't catch anything on fire. A quick search on the site will help you there.
  17. natureboy

    natureboy New Member

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    Thank you for the info as I believe I should get 4" as well seing that there will be 3 elbows, about 3 ft up to go out of foundation, then 2-3ft out, then up about 5t. I think I can do the install myself as hardest part will be knocking hole in foundation, but will get proper tool to make it easier. Saving the install cost would pay for a ton of pekktes.
    Thanks again.
  18. DiggerJim

    DiggerJim Feeling the Heat

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    What you're referring to is Equivalent Vent Length and you've got the values wrong. They should be:

    Each vertical foot = .5 x length
    Each horiztonal foot = 1 x length
    Each 45 elbow = 3 x length
    Each 90 (or Tee) = 5 x length

    When the total is 15 or more, you should move up to 4" pipe although if you're on the border (e.g. 16 or 17) you're probably okay with 3 if that's all you have. The rationale for this is that vertical pipe creates draft which reduces drag on the airflow, elbows change direction which increases drag on airflow and it's all relative to a straight shot of horizontal used as the baseline airflow drag.
  19. DiggerJim

    DiggerJim Feeling the Heat

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    See my previous post. You have 3 elbows (assuming 90 degrees) or 15' (3 x 5) + 8 ft vertical which is 4 ft equivalent (8 x .5) + 3 ft horizontal = 15 + 4 + 3 or 22' of equivalent vent length. Definitely 4" territory.
  20. cntbill

    cntbill New Member

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    Thanks for the corrections DiggerJim, I was trying to be on the safe side with the vertical, as I know in my setup I should change to 4" pipe and was trying to remember why I came up with the reason for me to go to the 4".

    That's why I put in "my understanding" and was hoping someone with a little more knowledge would pipe in.
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