1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Help me replace my Fisher Grandpa bear with something new.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by SpacemanSpiff23, Oct 22, 2013.

  1. SpacemanSpiff23

    SpacemanSpiff23 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Loc:
    Philadelphia, PA
    I just cleaned the chimney before the season starts and lost a lot of terracotta. We've decided to finally install a liner in the chimney, but the largest one that will fit is 6 inches. So now we are looking into getting a more appropriate stove for the opening size, as well as for the living space. Don't worry, the Fisher is being reused up at my parents cabin. So it is going to a good home.

    I've had a Fisher Grandpa Bear in my basement for about 6 or 7 years. It's worked great, even though it was a little smokey sometimes. But we never filled it to capacity, because it was just too much heat. We are looking for a replacement that is;

    1. Big enough to fit a 24" log.
    2. More efficient so we don't have to bring in so much wood.
    3. Easy to operate and maintain. I love the simplicity and lack of breakable parts on the fisher. You light it, fill it, and forget it. I would sacrifice some efficiency if it meant is was easier to work with.
    4. Able to heat at least 1500 sq. ft. We have a second wood stove that heats the living room and bedrooms. This one will heat the basement family room, kitchen and dining room.
    5. Uses a 6" flue.

    We use wood exclusively to heat our house, so this stove will run nonstop from October to March or April.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,381
    Loc:
    Salisbury, MD
    What is your budget?
    Joful likes this.
  3. BurnIt13

    BurnIt13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    Messages:
    619
    Loc:
    Central MA
    Is the 24" log capacity an absolute must? Most stoves that will accommodate wood that size are very large and likely require an 8" flue.

    A stove with the capacity to heat 1500 sq.ft. is relatively small.

    If you can live with 16-18" wood, somewhat the industry standard, it will open you up to a world of options. The 24" split requirement limits you significantly.
    Joful likes this.
  4. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    15,283
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    The closest thing I know of in the budget line of stoves would be the Englander NC30. If price is not an issue there are a couple of other large stoves (that is what it will take to hit your 24" capacity) on the market. Not many of the big stoves run on 6" though. 24" long stuff fits squarely in the "big stove" category. Even the 3.5 cuft NC30 only takes 20" stuff.
  5. SpacemanSpiff23

    SpacemanSpiff23 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Loc:
    Philadelphia, PA
    I could do less than 24". My stove upstairs does 24, so I'll just but the longer stuff up there. 18" should be fine.

    My budget is maybe around $500-$600? I'm not exactly sure what current wood stoves cost, and what you get for your money. I have never bought a new stove. We were hoping to find something on ebay or craigslist, but I don't know what brands or features to look for.
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2013
  6. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    15,283
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    That Grandpa Bear is a cavern. You will still need a big stove if you plan on obtaining the same amount of heat you are used to.
  7. stayfitz

    stayfitz Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2012
    Messages:
    295
    Loc:
    Reno, NV
    +1 for the NC30
  8. BurnIt13

    BurnIt13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    Messages:
    619
    Loc:
    Central MA
    The OP makes it seem like the Grandpa puts out way too much heat....so he dials it down to a more suitable heat level, which causes it to be smokey. Sounds like he needs a smaller stove to me.

    He has another stove upstairs so all he is doing is heating the basement + a kitchen. The NC30, although very affordable is a heat monster. Seems like it is too much stove for the application.

    To the OP....how well is your house insulated? How often do you expect to load the stove? Can you live with shorter wood length? What is your budget?
    Joful likes this.
  9. SpacemanSpiff23

    SpacemanSpiff23 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Loc:
    Philadelphia, PA
    I wouldn't mind if this stove did more work and the other stove did less. The back of the house (where this stoves heat goes is) is where we spend a lot of time, and it get's little to no sun. The house is horribly insulated and drafty. It was built very poorly in the 1920's. We load the stove throughout the day. If we walk by, and there is room for a log, we will throw one in. We could do shorter wood. Most of the stuff we get is shorter, and the other stove holds 24" logs. Budget is still under discussion. Nothing outragously high end, but i dont want a peice of junk that will barely work for 5 years and then fall apart. The Englander NC30 at Home Depot is $900. That is probably a little too high, but maybe a used one is an option.
  10. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,455
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    Long burn time + lower heat output = catalytic stove. Your budget will dictate used, so you have to keep an open mind on brand, but there are many steel (lower cost) cat stoves on the market now and past. Names to search would be Buck, Appalachian, Sierra, Kuma, High Valley, etc. Heck, might even find a used Blaze King, Jotul, or Woodstock cat at the right price, if you hunt hard enough.

    edit: Scratch my post. If you're used to throwing wood in every time you pass, a cat stove is not for you. There's a cycle: load, set, forget... which is the only way to burn in a cat stove. In fact, I think you'll have to adjust your habits with any EPA re-burn stove, cat or non-cat.
  11. BurnIt13

    BurnIt13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    Messages:
    619
    Loc:
    Central MA
    For what its worth...I own an Englander 30. It rocks. My house was a 1900 1500 square foot drafty, uninsulated mess. The 30 did well. It is very well constructed but puts out alot of heat. I was able to score mine for $550 but that was during the spring when they cut the prices and I had a 10% off coupon.

    Now that my house is insulated I want a catalytic stove. They burn low and slow and have great installation clearances. But they are pricey....so I'm going to have to live with the Englander for a few more years.

    You will also notice that you will have to adjust your burning habits with an EPA stove. You don't "throw a couple logs in" when you walk by like the old smoke dragons. You generally go through the complete burn cycle and add more wood when the previously burnt wood is coals and the stove is cooling down.
    Joful likes this.
  12. SpacemanSpiff23

    SpacemanSpiff23 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Loc:
    Philadelphia, PA
    Lower heat output isn't a huge issue. I just didn't ever need to burn the Grandpa Bear at full blast. That thing would melt the paint off the walls.
  13. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,381
    Loc:
    Salisbury, MD
    It is the worst time of year to try and buy a stove, prices are shooting up with demand rising. But with that said you can sometimes find a deal on CL but you will need to be quick to the draw as a quality stove goes quick.

    Getting rid of the 24" requirement you can find some used stoves close to your budget but they will be on the bottom spectrum of quality, $600 does not buy much stove these days. How about selling the Fisher, you should be able to get $400 for it maybe more if you paint it and get it looking good, put that money towards a new stove. The Englander nc30 or nc13 is the go to stove for budget stoves that still are made good.
    Joful likes this.
  14. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,926
    Loc:
    southern ontario
    You have priced the flue, haven't you? It's cost is significant.

Share This Page