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Help with Tree ID Please

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by PeteD, Jun 21, 2011.

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  1. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Yea it didnt to me either but post 5 lead me to that! Ash is what I first thought and still think. :cheese: The far away pic on post one looks a little like honey locust.

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  2. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    It's not ash. leaflets on ash are opposite- these are alternate. The terminal end looks more like pecan than black walnut (black walnut has a terminal leaflet sticking out- pics online look more like pecan)... but then I don't see pecan here, so can't be sure.
  3. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    No walnuts so thats easy enough on that one. Lets split a couple rounds? :cheese:
  4. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    From his post above, "Overall, the compound leaves on this tree tend to be more opposite than alternating".
  5. PeteD

    PeteD New Member

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    As I explained in my last post, most of the leaves are actually opposite. I just picked a bad one to photograph in original post (my bad).

    No pecans around here either. Definitely not walnut, I have lived here several years and would have been mowing walnuts for some time. Also no evidence of juglone effect under crown.

    I think smokinjay was right from the beginning.

    Got some other ones to ID also, may start a new thread tomorrow....
  6. CountryBoy19

    CountryBoy19 Minister of Fire

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    I just noticed you're from MA. That would explain the lack of pecans on this pecan tree. They will still grow outside of the typical range, however they will not fruit.

    I still think it's a pecan or hickory variant, are there any fruits or catkins of any type on the tree? That would really help us out a lot.
  7. PeteD

    PeteD New Member

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    As promised here are more photos of what I am pretty convinced now is either green or white ash, including some dried catkins:

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    [​IMG]

    Now to illustrate my point from a previous post leaflet variability in terms of opposite and alternate, here are two photos of leaves from the same purchased Black Walnut:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Thanks to everyone for your input.
  8. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    If that is Ash (I concur that it is) it is a White Ash.
  9. CountryBoy19

    CountryBoy19 Minister of Fire

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    I have NEVER seen an ash tree with more than 11 leaflets. One pictured leaf has 15, I do not think this is ash.

    Does ash even have catkins? My search tells me no. US Forest service doesn't list Ash as a species with catkins.

    Quoted from: http://www.suite101.com/content/catkins-in-spring-a51386

    Species with Catkins:

    Trees with catkins include those of the Beech family (oaks, chestnuts), the Willow family (willows, aspens, poplars, cottonwoods), the Birch family (birches, alders, hornbeams), the Mulberry family, and the Walnut family (walnuts, hickories). In the Willow family, both male and female flowers occur in the form of catkins, and for most species, a given tree has only one type, either male or female. In the Willow genus (Salix species), many catkins are small and upright, while cottonwoods and aspens have drooping catkins.



    If it's ash why is the wood an orange-brown color?
    Why so many leaflets?
    Why no fruit/seeds? Ash trees should have a bunch of seeds on them, you would see them.


    BTW, really appreciate the good photos, I think we'll eventually get it hashed out what species this is... I'm not entirely sure myself.
  10. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    I see one with 17 leaflets! PeteD, are you trolling? Mixing pictures of different trees? Not cool if you are. Just checking.
  11. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    I will look at my white ash trees when I get a chance to see what they have on them.
  12. PeteD

    PeteD New Member

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    Except for the two Black Walnut photos at the end of my previous post (as indicated in the post), these pictures are most definitely all of the same tree.

    This tree does not produce fruit every year, but when it does they are relatively short (less than 4 inches) pods. Certainly not trolling, just looking for help with the apparently hard to ID tree. Before I did any research, I thought it was ash. Then I thought could be Sumac family, but that is certainly not the case.

    Do ash really not get catkins?
  13. blujacket

    blujacket Minister of Fire

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    Butternut?
  14. golfandwoodnut

    golfandwoodnut Minister of Fire

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    I was just going to say pig nut Hickory. I have serval Hickory's that look just like that.
  15. PeteD

    PeteD New Member

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    I am starting to doubt my recollection of pods, now, too. LOL

    The photos are all the same tree, though my memory could be faulty...certainly have never had a ton of nuts on the ground under this tree though.

    I do have what I think is an ash in another spot on my property (looks much different than subject of this thread):
    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/76161/

    I will grab a photo of a cut branch and check for features of this tree.
  16. PeteD

    PeteD New Member

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    Wow, after looking at pictures of catkins and bark for mature black walnuts, starting to think Treepointer is right.

    Bummer of black walnut verdict would be that I have tomatoes near drip line of this tree (first time for tomatoes at this location)! I may be seeing how this wood splits!
  17. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    If you can get a twig and cut a bit of it lengthwise, then you can get a yea or nay on black walnut. It will have a chambered pith as seen here:
    http://owic.oregonstate.edu/pith.php
  18. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Maybe white walut aka butternut, Thats not black thats my money tree! :lol:
  19. PeteD

    PeteD New Member

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    I'll grab some more photos of cut branch and twigs. Walnut or butternut is going to result in cuttinup'. :)
  20. fishingpol

    fishingpol Minister of Fire

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    I am going with butternut or black walnut. Both have catkins and are good carving wood.
  21. PeteD

    PeteD New Member

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    Could not see any fruit tonight in dark but trimmed small trig on pole trimmer. Photos below:

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    Will look in AM if the rain isn't too bad for possible fruits...
  22. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    I have a few walnuts never seen cat skins.......When I say a few well thats the tree we are after 100 percent money! Milled not worth crap as firewood... %-P
  23. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Nice pic's 17 leave white walnut or butter nut! As wet as it is Walnuts would be forum and very visual now!
  24. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    Way too dark for Butternut.Odds are its Black Walnut going by that purplish-chocolate hue..Persimmon has to be very old to even have any heartwood,and then its just a small core of nearly black very dense wood.Hence its other not-so common name American Ebony,its a distant cousin of tropical ebonies growing in Asia & parts of Africa.
  25. PeteD

    PeteD New Member

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    Here a two sides of a small section that I just cut from a limb that was removed two or three weeks ago. That is reason for some blackening (I think). Penny for scale.

    Butternut? Or is this branch too small for dark heartwood???

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
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