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  1. Marja0105

    Marja0105 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2011
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    Loc:
    Ireland
    I'm looking for some help, i'm currently caretaking an old big house and I think the stove that's in the hall is a 'Smith & Wellstood lo courtier stove'. It's like a burnt red colour and as far as I am aware the last owners bought it approximately 30 years ago. Can anyone tell me about it and it's fuel requirements, i.e. coal, anthracite, wood?? We purchased a fan to go on top of the chimney due to lack of wind and it worked fine the first day and now again smoke, smoke, smoke! :-( Can't find any manual on line and I desperately need assistance.

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  2. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Connecticut
    Pictures man.............pictures.......

    Inside the stove, around it (not just the face of it only).........etc.

    -Soupy1957
  3. Marja0105

    Marja0105 New Member

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    Right oh will photograph it when I get home from work!
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Nov 18, 2005
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    South Puget Sound, WA
  5. Marja0105

    Marja0105 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2011
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    Loc:
    Ireland
    Yes I think it is prior to Esse but it's to be used as it has always been up to about ten years ago when the owners husband died. Unfortunately out of all their family he seems to be the only one out of the entire family who knew how to deal with it. I've attached a photo here, I have four more but am appearing to be still technologically challenged by importing five at one time so you'll all have to excuse me as I'll have to create a new post for each one, even having followed the instructions it still dumbfounds me.

    Attached Files:

  6. Marja0105

    Marja0105 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2011
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    Loc:
    Ireland
    Image 2.....

    Attached Files:

  7. Marja0105

    Marja0105 New Member

    Joined:
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    Ireland
    ...Image 3

    Attached Files:

  8. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

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    Good gosh!!! That's one Retro-looking unit!!!!!!

    -Soupy1957
  9. Marja0105

    Marja0105 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2011
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    11
    Loc:
    Ireland
    Image 4

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  10. Marja0105

    Marja0105 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2011
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    Ireland
    Yep, fairly out there all right!! And finally.... Image 5!!! :)

    Attached Files:

  11. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    That is a pretty outrageous looking stove. Thanks for the pictures. Why do the sides open up?

    I am suspecting the flue connection may be the issue here. Can you describe in detail the entire flue system including approximate lengths?
  12. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
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    My guess is that these are french stoves - from the era of the Chappee......

    See enclosed for the popular model - we sold it and it was somewhat popular in the early 80's. As I remember, the distributor was in Maine and may have had a name similar to the one you mentioned....
    I can't speak for that exact stove, but most of these models were made for coal or briquette (coal wood mixtures molded into bricks) which used to be popular in Europe as stove fuel.

    Here is a wood burning model.....
    http://www.c20fires.co.uk/stoves/s148.htm

    Closer inspection of the inside may help determine if it was more coal than wood.....if it has shaker grates (grates can move), then it is probably coal. If it has a fairly large ash pan - that usually means coal...

    Do some google image searches on chappee and you'll come across some of their stuff......not exactly similar, but close.

    Attached Files:

  13. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    I keep looking at that pic - have definitely seen that stove before! But long time ago.......one brand that comes to mind is Koppee

    Even the French company that made the Petit Godin had some which looked more like this one.

    An email to this guy might just be able to get a real answer!
    http://www.antiquefrenchstove.com/
  14. Marja0105

    Marja0105 New Member

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    Loc:
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    Completely outrageous stove alright!! :) The sides open up to allow the doors to open, if they are completely closed you can't open doors, it's a mad thing altogether!!
    I'll see how I go and I'll get those measurements for you, as far as I'm aware the pipes that go through the wall are made of, wait for it.... asbestos! I'll have to confirm that though. It was a homemade job back in the eighties anyway because they put it through the wall into the servants staircase, up through the roof then over the utility room. Leave it with me!! Thanks again for ye're assistance!!
  15. Marja0105

    Marja0105 New Member

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    Loc:
    Ireland
    I've sent an e-mail to those guys, we'll wait and see!! I'll let ye know how I get on!! Thank You!
  16. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

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    Wow!!! I'm baffled!!! That's an INCREDIBLE looking stove!!!!! I'm actually jealous, on some level!!!

    -Soupy1957
  17. CamFan

    CamFan Member

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    Aug 21, 2011
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    219
    Loc:
    North East Georgia
    I agree that is one cool looking stove.
  18. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    Jul 22, 2011
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    Upstate NY
    I would say that because of the wide fire doors, it was made to use either wood or coal, even if it has grates. I have a small Weso model 020 (German, from the 80's) of a similar configuration spec'd for wood/coal that works great with wood. The jacket (mine is tile) stretches out the heat as well as protecting from burns and reducing clearances. Because of the basin in the middle of the firebox for coal, wood burning requires a good ash bed to level the floor and reduce air flow. Sounds like you have a draft problem not an issue with the stove it's self. Resolve that first and try with wood.

    Ehouse
  19. geoxman

    geoxman Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
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    275
    Loc:
    STL City
    with the draft on the ash pan door it should work really well with coal. Neat stove good luck
  20. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    1,462
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    NE PA
    The joints between the glass panels is the secondary air inlet to admit oxygen to the top of a coal fire. Surdiac from Belgium, and Franco-Belge from France used the same principal in their coal stoves. It's not designed to use solid glass if any get broken.
    Many European coal stoves will not have movable grates for shaking. A small slot at the top of the grate level is used for a "slicer knife". The top of the grate will be flat and smooth for the knife blade to slide across. They work quite well. Their movable grates were for dumping only. Is there something sticking out in the center under the doors that a handle fits on to rock or move the grates?
  21. Marja0105

    Marja0105 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2011
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    11
    Loc:
    Ireland
    Ok people, it goes like this I have smoke everywhere as I post!! I received a reply today from the Esse Company and they told me as follows;

    "The picture shows the Lo Courtier Model finished in copper lustre. This stove could be run with the doors open by concealing the firedoors behind the wings if so desired. These stoves were made from the early 1960's until 1988. lots of these stoves were sold to British Rail in the early days. Sadly we have no spare parts left for the courtier".

    I, delighted with some information then requested to see if they had any manuals kept for use and for chimeny specifications etc and what fuelis required and this is what follows;

    "I am struggling here. I can't find any old instructions for this stove, but the fuel used would certainly have been solid fuel such as Anthracite, Phurnacite, Homeheat (????? anyone tell me what that means????) and Pureheat (???? again, I don't know what this is) but not black Bituminous Coal or Petroleum based fuels such as Petcoke" (again what's petcoke??)

    Me, being me, thinking all I have done wrong was to use coal (that we use in the regular fires around the house) and being so excited have just come home lit the bloody thing using dry kindlin to get the antracite to light and I can't see for the smoke and I have the fan going which we put up on top of the chimney (€400 down the drain I think!!). Smoke is just coming out the top like there's no tomorrow!!

    Oh, by the way, the round thing on the front is for a tool to look the doors is all, there is a side handle that you wiggle to shake the grates!

    Yours in disgust,
    Marja

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  22. Marja0105

    Marja0105 New Member

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    Loc:
    Ireland
    I know you can't see it properly, but that is smoke in the air! I've the front door and back door open to clear it, am going to seal it up now and give up....again!!
  23. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    1,462
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    NE PA
    They are referring to hard coal only, not to use soft coal.

    The problem with smoke is probably not the stove as long as the outlet is open. The pipe or chimney is not drafting. (natural rise of heat) Make sure it's all uphill from the stove to the chimney and everything is clear, no dampers closed, or obstructions in pipe or chimney. Was the new fan running when you first lit it? Did it pull ANY out ? We call them "draft inducer" to create draft. (or wind up the chimney) Make sure the fan is blowing the correct direction, OUT too. (You never know) You should be able to hold a piece of newspaper over the flue exit in the stove when it's cold, and the fan should pull the paper against the opening. This will prove draft. (suction)
    If someone was burning wood, the elbow or pipe could be blocked. Did someone check the pipe and elbow to make sure it's clear? A wood stove that clogs the pipe or elbow with creosote acts like you're describing.

    Not sure what you mean by smoke coming "out the top". Top of stove? When you light it, the loading doors should be closed, and if you let the ash pan door open a few minutes while attended, it should get roaring fast. Then slowly add coal. You may get a little smoke out the doors when first lighting, but a hot chimney should pull the smoke right out. The fan should only be needed if a chimney is undersized or too short.
    With the fan turned on, stove doors closed, air intake wide open, you should be able to shake a match out in front of the air intake and the smoke should be pulled through the intake into the stove. That prooves the draft is good as well.
  24. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    Has a mouse or something nested between the outer jacket and the firebox proper? Check the back especially. I've had this happen with kitchen ranges.

    Ehouse

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