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Hooking up my "new" Round Oak E-16

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by brucelon, Jul 20, 2013.

  1. brucelon

    brucelon Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Messages:
    15
    Loc:
    High desert, New Mexico
    Hi all -

    While RV camping in Eagle Nest, NM I made the mistake(?) of falling in love w/ a beautiful antique Round Oak wood stove which now sits in my living room.

    I have an existing 6" double-walled chimney and need to find out how to connect my stove to it. It has an oval opening 7 3/4" wide, 3 1/4" deep. The guy I bought it from says I can just "crush" a 6" pipe to fit the oval opening, but this doesn't cut it for me.

    I bought an "oval to round" adapter from VentingPipe.com, but the oval end is much too big, and is meant for a Vermont Casting stove.

    Any suggestions / solutions???

    Thanks in advance.

    Bruce

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  2. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    7,223
    Loc:
    N.E. Penna
    The crush the 6 inch pipe on it is the way that it was done for those units.

    Be certain that your clearance to combustibles is 36 inches for the unit all around. Also make sure you have a large hearth pad and that you contact your insurance company letting them know you are installing a stove that is not UL approved. If they won't allow it, you may need to do some insurance shopping.

    pen
  3. brucelon

    brucelon Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Messages:
    15
    Loc:
    High desert, New Mexico
    Thanks pen -

    Do you know - is the pipe just "crushed" by hand or is there some kind of crimping tool? Should a hose clamp help secure it to the exhaust oval rim?

    Your other points are more troubling. I'll have to do an chimney pipe offset to get the stove anywhere near 36" from the sheetrock walls (is sheetrock a "combustible" ?). Or, I think someone must sell a heat barrier that can be applied to the sheetrock to permit closer proximity b/t stove and wall. At least I have a nice large hearth pad.

    Oy - these things are NEVER easy, simple or inexpensive - as the salesman had me thinking..

    Thanks for your thoughts.

    Bruce
  4. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    N.E. Penna
    It's more of a squishing than a crushing. Just squeeze with both hands and fit the female end over that stove collar.

    Modern stoves are setup so that the male end goes into the stove so that creosote can't drip out, the old time units did it the other way thinking the draft would be better.

    That said, with the pipe upside down, you may need an adapter to fit into your next section of pipe if you wind up with 2 male ends looking at each other.

    Clearances can be reduced with a wall shield that is spaced 1 inch from the sheetrock wall (yes, that's considered combustible)

    Using a shield like this http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/sto...ve-board-32-in-w-x-42-in-h-black?cm_vc=-10005 or a little bigger one http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/sto...ve-board-36-in-w-x-52-in-h-black?cm_vc=-10005 there are ones that are tile patterned too but I think the black looks better, you should be able reduce the clearance to 18 inches (possibly 12 but my brain is foggy and I need to double check) so long as there is that one inch air gap behind a good shield such as those listed, or sheet metal, etc.

    To bring the shield off the wall the inch you can use long enough screws (into studs of course) and make 1 inch spacers from copper pipe, or make strips of something like durock or hardibacker.

    BUT, before you get this going any further, check with the insurance company first. If you don't, and god forbid there is a fire, they'll say sorry, no coverage.

    Good luck,

    Also, what are your heating goals with this unit?

    pen
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    50,948
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    You can reduce the clearances down to 12" with a proper NFPA 211 wall shield. It needs to be entirely non-combustible, 1" from the wall on insulators and be open top and bottom by 1" to allow heat to freely convect behind it. You could use tiled cement board, prefab wall shield board or get creative and use a period metal (like ceiling tin) as long as it fits the basic requirements.

    For sure check with the insurance company once you have a plan of action that is cleared with the local inspecting authority. If you can present them with a plan and drawings that show you are adhering to code they should be ok, but first check.

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/stove_wall_clear
    pen likes this.

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