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Hoping I haven't messed up my woodstove installation

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Kentucky Greg, Nov 6, 2012.

  1. Kentucky Greg

    Kentucky Greg New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
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    I moved into a new (to me) house about two years ago and have been missing my woodstove. I decided to install one. I looked on craigslist and bought one. I built a hearth and was looking to get the pipe to line my chimney when the man asked if I'd talked to my insurance agent. I had not. I basically need to make sure that I'm installing it according to manufacturer's instructions. I'm wondering if I can make what I've done work. I don't really know what I'm doing... I just let my enthusiasm lead the way.

    Basically, I'm not sure if I have enough clearance with what I built to satisfy my insurer. I hope to use this stove: 2007 B King Pedestal with Ash Pan and Blower. I'm attaching a picture of its spacing requirements. The stove by my measurements is 18" x 27". My hearth is 48.5" x 48.5". The thimble (that's what I was told the hole in the wall is called) is 18" from the nearest point. The thing that is making it hard on me is that I'm installing it in a sort of corner. The old coal burning fireplace was in a triangular shape in the corner and I used those same dimensions (I'm not sure if you can tell that in the pictures or not).

    Can anyone give me any input as to what I might need to do to make this work? I don't know if it matters but:
    - The house is an 80 year old farm house
    - The wall that the hearth is in front of is brick behind the stone and used to be for a coal burning fireplace.
    - The thimble was already there and is 6"diameter
    - I worked really hard on the stone

    2012-11-06_13-40-43_188.jpg 2012-11-06_13-40-49_225.jpg 2012-11-06_14-17-58_979.jpg 2012-11-06_17-32-05_598.jpg View attachment 80066

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  2. Kentucky Greg

    Kentucky Greg New Member

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    Does anyone have any thoughts on this?
  3. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    What will the actual distance be from the corner of the stove (once installed) to that wall? I believe the 18inches from the corner of the stove for a corner installation would be the requirement if you were putting it in a true corner where you are splitting a 90 degree angle with the stove. It appears as though the angle is such that the wall would fall further away from the stove here than it would in a regular corner install.

    That said, if you have 26 inches from the side of the stove to that wall, you are good regardless. If you have 18 and it's not a true corner, you might be good as well, it's just tough to tell from here without getting measurements from the stove actually sitting there.

    It is a very nice looking hearth btw.

    pen
  4. Kentucky Greg

    Kentucky Greg New Member

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    I haven't set it there to measure (it's too heavy to move on my own) but by my estimate just now it looks like 23.5".
  5. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    Considering that label says the corner of the stove can be 18 away form the wall in a corner installation, I'd say that I can't see a problem with your plan.

    pen
  6. madison

    madison Minister of Fire

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    Make a cardboard template of the stove - with the extra space for the clearances required for the unit. And use this template on the existing hearth to determine if it will work.

    Use this method to shop for a stove that would work.

    The stone, on top of the brick: is there wood studs behind the brick?

    Consult your town/city/village building department, they have a wealth of knowledge and MAYBE required to inspect the install (building permit?? since it is a refurbish). My insurance company only required that the town building inspector cleared the installation.
    pen likes this.
  7. Kentucky Greg

    Kentucky Greg New Member

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    Just an update... I talked to my insurance co inspector to talk through the chimney liner, etc. I've finished but am waiting on the inspector. That's good advice madison & pen. I'm hoping to use the stove I have and that the clearances are OK but if the inspector finds a problem, I'll do that when shopping for another if I must.
  8. Jasper 83

    Jasper 83 New Member

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    Loc:
    Hallieford, Va
    Are heat shields available for your stove. That may solve the problem altogether right there.

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