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Horizontal chimney pipe length (thru the wall)

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by coffeeman, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. coffeeman

    coffeeman New Member

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    Hello everyone, I'm new to the forum here but have been reading for many hours trying to put together an install for a new VC Encore stove that I have coming in a few days. And BTW, this site is great! There is so much good info here but I haven't found anything specific to my situation.
    SO...after much time spent pricing and configuring of chimney systems from the internet, I just purchased from Lowes enough chimney pipe and a thru the wall kit to complete do an install for the chimney pipe section. But I've run into a snag concerning the horizontal branch of the tee that comes into the house through the thimble. Basically, the way my house is built, there is a 20" overhang from the floor above that prevents me from simply going vertical once I've gone through the wall. In, fact a 36" piece of chimney pipe works quite well with 3 inches of the pipe coming into the living space. After reading the Supervent installation instructions, they state that the max length of chimney pipe I should use is 24" to the tee. I was under the impression that 36" was an acceptable horizontal run? Am I interpreting things correctly? Looking for some advice from more experienced people.

    Thanks!

    Jim

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  2. charly

    charly Guest

    I believe 24 inches is the max length going through a wall according to the Duravent install I did. Also Duravent wanted 6 inches of the Class A pipe protruding beyond the inside thimble to my wall. I had 3 inches with an 18 inch piece,,, ugg!!! ,,, So with a 24 I have 9 inches. Maybe you can move your outside Tee closer to the wall so more pipe comes inside, yet you still have to maintain the clearance outside to your combustible's, for the chimney going up. Read your installation manually thoroughly before doing everything,,, saves a lot of headaches or holes cut that won't meet the specs for proper clearances.
  3. jtb51b

    jtb51b Feeling the Heat

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    If you use the 36" piece what will you be bolting the cleanout T bracket to? It should be attached to the wall, and then the chimney stacked up from there. There will be a LOT of weight on this thing.. Just a thought..

    Jason
  4. chimneylinerjames

    chimneylinerjames Feeling the Heat

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    You would need class A chimney pipe outside and need to cut a hole thru the soffit and roof. wall-support-thru-soffi.jpg
  5. jtb51b

    jtb51b Feeling the Heat

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    I think he is talking about room overhang. Not a traditional soffit overhang. Such as a bay window would protrude, I know he isnt trying to block a window, just the easiest way to describe it.

    Jason
  6. jtb51b

    jtb51b Feeling the Heat

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    You will have to attach the wall support directly to the wall, and then use offsets to clear the 20" overhang. These parts aren't available from lowes, you will have to buy from a dealer. IIRC the largest offset you can use is a 30* and that would require a 3' piece of your class a (maybe a little more) to make that offset work out. Then you could go straight up and top out with the rest of the kit, remember you have to have 2" of clearance between the class A and the wall (if its combustible) the wall bands provide this clearance when used.

    Jason
  7. chimneylinerjames

    chimneylinerjames Feeling the Heat

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    Ok as if the entire house kicks out 20". I understand. I do not know what to do in that situation except go up thru the middle of the home. Find a closet to hide the chimney in.
  8. coffeeman

    coffeeman New Member

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    Yes, I have a 20" overhang of living space directly above the floor I plan to install the stove. It prohibits me from bringing the tee in any closer. That's where I go vertical against the side of the house. I was going to construct a box off of the wall to attach the support bracket to. I know it's not the prettiest thing but it would make it work. Also, the Supervent instructions say to never offset an exterior chimney. So I can't even use 30 degree offsets to clear the overhang.

    I'm hoping there's an option other than to go vertical through the house and having to build an enclosure in the upstairs bedroom which is already too small. Is that what has to be done in this situation?
  9. jtb51b

    jtb51b Feeling the Heat

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    Hmmmm, tough spot.. I would offset it before I went through the living space. Is there another location that would allow a straight up install? I have seen it done before (class A support being supported by a stand alone structure) but my thoughts are this: They say NOT to go longer than 24" of horizontal, and the also say NOT to offset an exterior chimney--- which one of these rules will you break to do what you want? Which would be the biggest problem?

    Jason
  10. coffeeman

    coffeeman New Member

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    Well, I don't want to break any rules. I'm wondering if there are alternatives. Other products that allow this? Maybe DuraPlus? I read their manual and all they say is, "If the wall is less than 6 inches thick, use a 9-inch Chimney Section; if the wall is between 6 and 9 inches thick, use a 12-inch Chimney Section". It doesn't say not to use a longer one but I don't want to assume.
  11. chimneylinerjames

    chimneylinerjames Feeling the Heat

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    I am not sue you will find and system allowing you to go 36" or so horizontal then having a tee supported off the underside of the overhang. There are not any other sides of the home where you can vent the stove?
  12. coffeeman

    coffeeman New Member

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    It's a split-level home (I didn't care for the design when we bought the house and now I'm REALLY starting to dislike it more). The floors are basically staggered from one floor to the next. The ONLY place in the home where all this goes away is on the mid-level section. But that would prohibit the downstairs level from being heated. Mulling over the idea of framing in a finished bump-out just big enough to accomodate the stove pipe (double-wall) and bring it out flush with the overhang. Will look kind of silly, but I guess it would solve the problem. What I don't understand is that the stove pipe can run horizontally longer than the chimney pipe which seems to be a much higher quality product. But I'm sure I'm missing something.
  13. MnDave

    MnDave Guest

    From what I read. The overhang is on the outside. Right? ie. the main floor is cantilevered 20 " over the lower floor.

    Then, 36 inches of pipe from the tee gets you into the room. That 36" inches is marginal and being outside doesn't help either.

    How high will it be? I doubt 25 feet of stack would be enough to overcome that horizontal ... and you still additional horizontal on the stovepipe.

    Tough one. Maybe call a professional installer and pick his brain a little.

    I have never seen an installation like this.

    You may be forced to abandon that location.

    MnDave
  14. Ablaze Tech

    Ablaze Tech New Member

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    If you live in a state that has pretty cold winters you are going to want to run the chimney in the house. Chimneys that run up the side of the house perform poorly because they are subjected to the cold weather. You will have much better draft, less creosote formation, you wont have to use an expensive T,and your stove will perform much better if you can somehow find a place inside to run it.
    MnDave likes this.
  15. adams614

    adams614 Member

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    With 36 inches horizontal that close to stove you may run into serious draft issues as well.
  16. coffeeman

    coffeeman New Member

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    Thanks for all the info guys, very helpful.

    Yes, the house is cantilevered 20" out with the floor above. The original plan was 15' of vertical after the tee. I thought having the pipe outside was ok but I particularly liked the ease of installation. I think I would rather go through the roof straight up than to move the stove. Our house is only about 1600sf. And the way it's laid out, there are no good spots to put a wood stove in without sacrificing valuable living space except for the proposed location. Is going straight up and through a bedroom going to be a major PITA? I did some measuring, and I can build an enclosure in the upstairs bedroom that will work.

    Also, if I go straight up, how do you incorporate a cleanout into it?
  17. MnDave

    MnDave Guest

    Yes a major PITA.

    But having that pipe on the inside is much better like Ablaze Tech said. And since your chimney length is only 15' not having a bend in the stovepipe will be a very good thing.

    The stove box becomes your cleanout.

    Good luck. You can do it. Just don't cut any corners on the chimney chase.

    MnDave
  18. coffeeman

    coffeeman New Member

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    What do you guys recommend for the chase. My original though is to just enclose it in drywall, framed, maintaining the minimum 2" clearance with a "little extra" just to be on the safe side.
  19. Ablaze Tech

    Ablaze Tech New Member

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    If you want to be real safe use metal 2x4s. It might be an overkill but if you use wood 2x4s maintain your 2 " clearance to combustibles you will be fine.
  20. chimneylinerjames

    chimneylinerjames Feeling the Heat

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    Metal studs are a good idea. That would reduce the overall size of the chase a bit.

    And for a clean out if the chimney could go straight off the top of the stove, when you clean it all the creosote would end up in the stove. Just vacuum out the stove then. From the stove to the ceiling you could use black stove pipe. I would use an adjustable slip connector here. That way when cleaning you can slide the pipe up easily and vacuum the top of the stove out. You could then even clean it from the bottom.

    Your draft would be really good going straight up also.
    Ablaze Tech likes this.
  21. coffeeman

    coffeeman New Member

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    Metal studs are a great idea. It's alot more work but I think it's going to work out well. The stove pipe is seemingly going to fall right in the middle of the floor joists above it. Concerning the black stove pipe, are you saying to make the slip connector the 1st piece coming out of the stove?
  22. MnDave

    MnDave Guest

    Yes. Check out 22 gauge Heatfab seamless stovepipe. They sell the slip connector. I got mine from hartshearth.com.

    The 22 gauge was tricky to cut but you should not have to.

    MnDave
  23. coffeeman

    coffeeman New Member

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    Thanks for the link but I need to use double-wall to keep the clearance for the back of the stove to 7". The attic part of the install is confusing me. I've figured out that an attic insulation shield will not work because where the chimney pipe enters the attic there is not enough clearance to the roof sheating. What's the best way to go from the chase into the attic?
  24. MnDave

    MnDave Guest

    I see on the need for double wall. I seem to recall that a slip connector in doublewall is available somewhere.

    I would think that a ceiling box is the right part.

    MnDave

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