1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

How’d you afford your new stove?

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by joecool85, Mar 16, 2011.

  1. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    7,108
    Loc:
    N.E. Penna
    If you look for a stove on craig's list, just be sure you know what you are buying. I'd only suggest an EPA stove to you.

    I purchased mine Englander 30 that was 1 year used for 450. It also came w/ a brand new extra set of baffle boards. A guy tried installing it in a trailer and cooked them out so he wanted to get rid of it.

    If you have an existing chimney you can throw a SS liner down it for probably less than 500. If not, a new Class A will be more but if you do it yourself will save you 50%.

    Regardless, get your wood on hand NOW! Or else you won't be able to enjoy a new stove. If the stove isn't ready for this coming winter, the wood would still be there waiting for you the following year.

    pen

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    Messages:
    1,019
    Loc:
    The coldest major city in Canada
    ......And if you look at used ones, don't pay too much. A BRAND NEW EPA stove can be bought around here for $700, any day of the week.
    I have seen good deals on used insulated chimney in the classifieds.

    Off topic but,
    An adoption costs $50K down there? Yikes! :-/
  3. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    9,409
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    Doesn't cost 50k$, there must have been "circumstances" and attorneys.
  4. Wade A.

    Wade A. Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    360
    Loc:
    South
    Joe, I'm going to go against the grain on most of the advice you've been given. Most of us here, I'm predicting, by our very nature are fiscal conservatives, and I think of myself as one also. However, I'm not one to say that all debt is bad. There is good, and necessary debt, and bad and frivolous debt. Covering entertainment expenses by high interest revolving consumer debt is soundly in the second category. A woodstove, in my opinion, is not. A couple of reasons why.

    First off, it is a durable good, that depreciates at an extremely slow rate. That is just another way of saying, "it lasts." It is also an appliance that will reduce your power/gas bill AND increase your degree of comfort in your home. Secondarily (or maybe even primarily)when you are comfortable, you live better, make better decisions and are less likely to throw money at your discontentment, as many around us do everyday. It is not real estate, but it is the next best thing: A fixture to real estate. It can be sold with a house to increase the value of the property, or it can reasonably be removed and installed in a new dwelling. And lastly, it is likely to bring you and your new bride closer together over many a winter night. THAT my friend, is worth a few interest points if nothing else is.

    So, I guess that what I'm saying is that I'd look less at the fact that you may be taking on more debt, and look more closely at the nature of that debt. From the sketch you've painted of your fiscal habits, I'd say that you are a low risk to get crazy. Between now and the next heating season, save, yes, but when the frost is next on the pumpkin, shop for a low interest loan, possibly a home equity one, or start buying a stove on lay-away from a retailor who is willing to do that for you. Enjoy.
  5. orionrogue

    orionrogue New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2010
    Messages:
    53
    Loc:
    Plymouth County, MA
    Although I'm not fresh out of school, my wife and I just had a baby not too long ago and the economic strain is not insignificant. I was hoping to go ahead with a stove insert for 2010 before the tax incentive expired, but I wasn't willing to finance the cost (right before Christmas, too!) and we'd just gotten the family mover (minivan) so our discretionary funds were pretty much depleted. So for 2010-1, it just didn't happen.

    Things to keep in mind: Save where you can, when you can. It can be little or large, and I won't reiterate what's already been said here for details. All good ideas. Right now you have debt that you know about and your long term goal should be to eliminate that as soon as reasonably possible, from highest to lowest pain. Generally, that's credit cards, followed by auto, then student loans and/or mortgage. Since mortgages are so large (in MA anyway...) its something you'll be with for a while.

    The only other thing I'd say, and I think it was stated already, is to gather your cordwood NOW, and as much as possible. If you don't have a solution for next season, it'll still be there for you in 2012-13. So start that, absolutely. You can always install the stove in the summer/fall, but that wood will need all season to dry out enough to be of any use to you next winter. Good luck to both you and your bride.

    Oh, and for your estimate, fuel oil in New England will absolutely before over $4/gal, approaching $5.
  6. Jack Straw

    Jack Straw Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2008
    Messages:
    2,161
    Loc:
    Schoharie County, N Y
    I haven't read all of the posts on this thread, but I think get the main points. Wouldn't it be great to form a consortium of Hearth.com members that could fund such projects. I would be willing to invest say $50. If we could get enough money together to help people in this type of situation and they could pay us back with interest. Maybe this could be a way to help spread the "wood burning lifestyle" and lower our country's oil dependency. I know its a little crazy, but your not gonna change things without thinking out of the box.
  7. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    6,207
    Loc:
    Carver, MA.
  8. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    Messages:
    2,830
    Loc:
    Commonwealth Of Massachussetts
    Buy a used stove. I bought my present stove at a scrapyard for $75. It is a gasser even though it is 30 years old. I got my previous stove at a yard sale for free. It was an antique and needed a lot of work. I bought a VC Defiant back in the day for $400 used out of the classified. That was the king of stoves back then. Down here on the Cape, there are always used stoves for sale. If you find one on craigslist, submit pictures here. These folks know which used stove are good and which are junk. Explain to the wife that this is just a starter stove and she can have house jewelry next time. You will save enough bucks on oil to buy a new stove after the first winter. Keep your eyes out for a Tempwood. That is what I burn. The first gassifier, tons of heat, easy to run, huge box for overnight, easy on wood.
  9. VCBurner

    VCBurner Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2010
    Messages:
    1,509
    Loc:
    Templeton, MA
    http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs...&cj=true&srccode=cii_9324560&locStoreNum=2624

    HD is still advertising this whopper of a deal for $650 with free delivery. If you're looking for an affordable stove, this is it! You can look around for a used one and get it even cheaper, but at this price you'd be silly to pass it up. This stove normally goes for $1000 and even at this price is an affordable modern stove that is highly regarded here on this site. As others have said you can line an existing masonry chimney for as little as $260 (if it is 15' tall,) a class A can be had for a few hundred also. Installing it yourself is easy and will $ave you lots of money. Once youy go through next winter, you'll be able to buy just about any stove with the money you'll save on heating costs. Buy the stove now and save up for the chimney in the fall. Meanwhile get your wood ready and learn how to install the chimney and look around for good prices. By the winter you'll be ready to heat.

    FYI, I have two EPA rated catalytic stoves that are still being made today that were purchased from Craigslist for a combined cost of $950. The first is a Dutchwest by Vermont Castings, new around $1500, I paid $550 for a rebuilt one. The second a Vermont Castings Defiant Encore, new around $2500, I paid $400 for a used one in great condition. I'm not against buying used stoves and usually would be the first to say go for it. But this Englander 30-NCH stove has to be one of the best deals out there. It is unbelievable to me that HD is able to offer them at this price. It just goes to show the power of the big box stores (I'm not a big fan of the big box stores either!) Get yourself one and share your experience, I'll be willing to bet you won't regret it.

    Good luck, keep us posted!
  10. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    6,207
    Loc:
    Carver, MA.
    Surprised you haven't sprung for one yet and sold the VC ... I am impressed how clean burning the NC30 is rated (the efficiency is not as good at 63%) ! That stove burns almost as clean as a cat stove.. The 30 would be too big for this house I think and would cook me out of it.. Still one hellava deal..

    Ray
  11. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,815
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Jack, I too have thought about this but fear it could easily get out of hand. We have to remember this forum is open to all and someone with perhaps not as honorable intentions could come to get some dollars and how would we recoup those dollars if they just ran off? I think it would be very difficult to implement and control.
  12. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2009
    Messages:
    8,426
    Loc:
    So Cent ALASKA
    Most all of us have been there. You buy what you 'NEED", "wants" take a back seat for a while.
    I bought many used items. Never had a new car till in my late 40s.
    So many extra - part time jobs I've forgot most of them.
    Traded work for items.
    Debt is a killer & hard to get ahead of. (+ almost impossible to retire with debt)
    Pay your bills, then pay yourself with (buy only "needs) savings IRA etc.
    None left, that's ok, you owe nobody. Your ahead of 70% of Americans.

    It will turn out well, hard work prevails.
    No "instant - add water" solutions. Keeping up with the Jones means having their "debt too"
    Time & honest work, frugal & smart decisions. You may be able to retire early.
    To have what a 50 or 60 year old person has at the age of 25, means your future is mortgaged & some banker got rich off of your work.

    Buy a used stove, or trade some work for one. Type don't matter now.
    So you burn a little more wood. Just cut more. You will be working for "you", no taxes. Owe nobody for it. kinda nice .
    The time will come when you can get a better one, by then you know what a better one is & if it will meet "your needs" & fit your budget.

    Only when you are debt free, are "you working for you" ;)
  13. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    9,226
    Loc:
    Lake Wissota
    What about refinancing your mortage? Rates are low and you may be able to bundle all your debt together and pay less per month.
  14. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,443
    Loc:
    S.NH- Mass's smoking section
    I prayed to Cthulhu
  15. yooperdave

    yooperdave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2010
    Messages:
    1,127
    Loc:
    Michigan's U.P.
    just like the vehicles you described as owning, also start with a used wood stove. the money you will save on your heating bills can then be used for other bills...but in reality, you won't see any of the "saved money", its just that you won't have to spend as much. but, i would think you can find a good used wood stove and your estimate of $2500 would be reduced by....1/2...or more????
  16. Jaugust124

    Jaugust124 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Messages:
    374
    Loc:
    Mid-Hudson Valley, NY
    If you go to Lowes or Home Depot for a stove they usually offer 0% interest for 12 months on purchases over $299.

    I know more debt may not sound like a good idea, but if its interest free and you can be dedicated enough to get it paid off inside of 12 months,
    you may be able to make this work for you. You just have to make sure it gets paid off or you will get hit with a full 12 months worth of interest at what will surely be a very high interest rate.

    Whats nice about Lowes and HD is that you are not required to pay a certain amount each month,
    you just pay what you can. It just takes some discipline to make that payment, but it sounds like you have that already. Good luck.
  17. VCBurner

    VCBurner Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2010
    Messages:
    1,509
    Loc:
    Templeton, MA
    These NC30 stoves aren't going anywhere anytime soon. Plus, I'd have a really hard time selling the idea of another $650 spent on stoves this year. So far the Encore was $400, warming shelves were $90 something, new cat for the DW about $60 (find of the century, thanks to you!). The total is about $550. That total is still small compared to the savings in heating costs. Keep in mind I still need a full liner in my chimney! The Englanders are taking the woodburning world by storm by getting together with HD, as much as I hate the thought. I hope this continues to be a winning formula for them and they continue to create more jobs here in the US. We all know what happens when these companies get too big. Their britches get made in China!

    Anyway, before I think about buying another one, I need to sell one of the four that are in here now! :wow: The old cast iron stove will become some sort of outdoor stove! The Surdiac combo stove will be subject to a possible rebuild and sale. I want to refurbish it before it goes to someone else. I won't sell it unless it is safe to operate. A thermostat and some glass strips as well as gaskets are needed. The thing is great with coal. 24 hour loads! The Encore has yet to burn and I will not sell it before it does. It could turn out to be a killer stove. It has two big advantages over the Dutchwest: top loading and thermostatic control. These are very usefull attributes, that coupled with even higher efficiency and longer burn times, could prove to be the winning combination in this household! Always nice talking to you Ray!
  18. Alan Gage

    Alan Gage Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2008
    Messages:
    88
    Loc:
    NW Iowa
    What's the house like? What is the insulation level in the walls/attic? What are the windows like? How drafty is it?

    As much as I like wood stoves if it's a drafty, poorly insulated house, the money would probably be better spent taking care of those items. That alone would lower your fuel costs and when it came time to get a wood stove you could get by with a smaller one and it would be better able to heat the place.

    Have you ever used a small stove before? I only ask since you're looking at stoves with very small fireboxes. I just got the Englander 17-VL (had the NC-30 before) because I'm building a small, energy efficient house this summer and it should be the right size. I did a break in fire outside with it over the weekend and I was surprised how small a 1.1 cu. ft. firebox really is. Much of my wood that's already cut (9 cords) will be too long and a lot of it will need to be split smaller. It looks like it might be hard stuffing it with wood and keeping the splits from rolling out.

    BTW, I'm in the "save money, pay cash" crowd.

    Alan
  19. VCBurner

    VCBurner Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2010
    Messages:
    1,509
    Loc:
    Templeton, MA
    Hey Joe, here's what I did, BTW. My first stove was advertised for $100 on craigslist and I paid $80 for it. Never pay asking price for anything! At least not if it's the full price. It heated my house for an entire season. The cost of the fuel it saved was well over $1500 for the first year. The wood was scrounged. And we here can relate to the $ shortage! We started heating with wood because we had no money for oil! The price had reached $4/gallon and we didn't have $400 for a minimum delivery. So I bought a cord of wood to burn in a fireplace and keep the furnace from burning the last drop of oil that was in there. Since then we went from an old cast iron (1936) to a 1980 combination stove to two modern catalytic stoves that when combined could heat 3500 sq ft. We are a family of six and my income is the only one in the home. To add to the trouble, since the housing market crashed, I saw a $25,000/ year pay cut. We have seen an increase since that dramatic drop off. But nothing like the pre-recession. We have adjusted and are just barely bouncing back. More like rolling along! :cheese: Thanks to wood heat, we have not run out of oil and are always warm. In fact, if it drops below 73 in here we are cold!

    Good luck, stay warm, search on!

    Chris
  20. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,443
    Loc:
    S.NH- Mass's smoking section
    I sell an autographed line of rubber protuberances.

    OK- I'm done now
  21. Billy123

    Billy123 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2011
    Messages:
    74
    Loc:
    PA
    I would sell the place and move back in with Mom and Dad, and then flood the place with little one's.
  22. joecool85

    joecool85 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Messages:
    856
    Loc:
    Central Maine
    The ideas just keep coming huh guys?

    Ok, about our home. It is a 1,250 sq foot two story cape in Central Maine. It's reasonably well insulated with blown cellulose in the walls and a foot of fiberglass batting in the attic. It's not drafty anymore now that I've gone through and foamed up (I love spray foam) all of the areas we had draft the first year. Even when it is -20F outside there is no significant draft. We have a hot water boiler that provides our heat via baseboard as well as our domestic hot water. We go through 700-750 gallons of #2 oil every year.

    Our living room, where the stove would go, has no chimney. In fact, the only chimney in the house goes up through the kitchen and has the boiler on it. Anyway, the living room is only 14' x 16' so we don't have a lot of space. We would like to put the stove in the corner and it would go "between" the baseboards. This gives us a 37" x 54" spot to put a stove. Due to clearances etc, unless we put protection on the walls, we only have a few options for stoves that "fit". Primarily the Morso 1440 and the Englander 17VL. I could fudge the numbers a little bit and squeeze a Jotul 602CB in, but I want to make sure it is totally safe as well as ok with my insurance co (and wife for that matter).

    I'm all for a used stove, but finding one to fit in our living room would be next to impossible. Someone else mentioned buying a used chimney...which I'm also not fond of and I think the insurance co wouldn't love it either. We're working on coming up with some ideas to scrape together some cash to get a stove and chimney and we'll have to sit down and see what we have for progress in that dept. in a month or two and re-evaluate.
  23. Poult

    Poult Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2008
    Messages:
    111
    Loc:
    Northern NYS
    Craig's List. I saw a stove just like mine, same age, but used only one winter, for $800. I damn near wanted to buy it as a spare. :) Someone got themselves one heck of a bargain on that stove. Look around and you'll find a deal.
  24. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,516
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    Home Depot here marked the 2 VL-17 they have left from $520 to $480 Sunday.
    ( kinda surprised, in the past they just put them up on a shelf for next year and use the space for lawnmowers by now)

    I like the looks of the Morso, too, but I have a hard time seeing myself cutting wood at 11 to 12 inches.
    and buying even 15-16 inches around here is hard enough.

    I cut my own, so length really isn't an issue
    but I am three years ahead and everything is 16" long.

    Plain and practical starts looking pretty good, especially to the wallet.


    You've got plenty of time ahead of you to have nice stuff.
    Worry about getting there.
  25. oilstinks

    oilstinks Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2008
    Messages:
    457
    Loc:
    western NC
    Bought mine on clearance at Home Depot in spring and talked them down a few more dollars. Englander NC13 $460

Share This Page