1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

How many older wood stoves out there?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Michael6268, Dec 8, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Michael6268

    Michael6268 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    423
    Loc:
    Grafton NH/Upper Valley
    A friend of mine had a discussion about wood stoves today and had two different opinions on what type of wood stoves are mostly being used today. I tend to think that there are still many more older "airtight" wood stoves still around and are the majority of what is in use at this time, and he thinks there are practically non left and everyone has invested in newer EPA stoves. I am not questioning that the newer stoves are better for the environment etc. I am just wonder what the ratio might be for older vs newer stoves at this time?? I tend to think 70% older with 30% newer.... PS. I dont have either, I pollute the environment with coal.....(but to a lesser extent)

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    2,430
    Loc:
    Halifax, VA
    I think the ratio was probably closer to 50 - 50 until this year and the catastrophic oil price increases, which lead me believe that the ratio NOW is probably closer to 70 - 30 like you said.
  3. fbelec

    fbelec Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2005
    Messages:
    1,670
    Loc:
    northern massachusetts
    hi michael

    i don't know how to do it but you should put up a poll. maybe craig or mo can help with that.
    there was a earlier post on how much electricity poeple were using. if you can setup that type of poll that should be interesting. maybe something like brand and how old.

    27 year old vermont castings defiant
  4. hardwood715

    hardwood715 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Messages:
    410
    Loc:
    Hyde Park, New York
    1980 gold marc fireplace insert -gold marc industries monticello ny, ul listed 1482 stamped on back plate, still in great shape !
  5. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    28,740
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    -1985 Sierra T-4600 heating the house just like it always has since the house was built.

    -2005 Jotul F3 CB sitting in the basement cold as a stone because it didn't bring anything to the dance when I burned it for a week.

    -2005 Jotul F100 heating my shop, kind of.

    Secondary burn ain't nothing new. The Sierra currently has a nice rolling blue/yellow burn going up top keeping the nasties out of the chimney and the Jotul downstairs from freezing to death in its sleep.
  6. DavidV

    DavidV New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Messages:
    792
    Loc:
    Richmond VA
    approx 89 Appalachian cat stove. Still going strong. Have a friend who burns an old airtight. His dad does also. I've talked till I'm blue in the face. Can't wait till this current wood burning craze blows over so I can scoop up a used non cat stove.
  7. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,746
    Loc:
    Central Sands, Wisconsin
    1970-ish Klondike, big steel box lined with firebrick and has thick cast iron doors. I wouldn't exactly call it "airtight", but it does ok. Partially controlled by the amount of wood put in it!

    Not used anymore: A couple old Round Oaks, a couple old box stoves, some strange thin steel stove with a spring loaded draft, and an old Franklin which is totally worthless (really thin cast with thumb nuts to hold the doors closed).
  8. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,859
    Loc:
    Eastern Nebraska
    I have owned 4 stoves ( 1 being the Pacific Energy now ) and 1 wood furnace that was in a "farm house" i rented when i moved to this state looking for a house to buy. 13 truck loads a year in that 1920's beast . Anyway i get less "now" heat with the newer stove , yes i said that correct even tho own a 97k btu P.E. stove. But we all know how the old pot belly stove goes. Hot for 1 hour or so and then nothing. The older stoves are good heaters if you have the time to baby them and have a lot of free wood . The newer stover are a lot longer burners and do work better in a house then the old smokers. Times have changed and it was time to step up to the newer stove. I guess wood stoves are like cars , some buy the newer and some dont have a problem with the older. "ME"? I drive the older cars and trucks , get free wood by cutting it myself , i bought the newer stove. The old cars are fine .......... the old stoves for me were not.
  9. Rhone

    Rhone Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Messages:
    824
    The houses in my area were built in the early 60's and went through the oil crisis of the 70's. Many houses in my area back then went into wood heating. When the oil crisis passed people phased back to oil.

    Now that it's expensive for oil again, judging by the looks of things I think more people are dusting off those 70's stoves in my area. The amount of smoke tells me they're not EPA stoves. I'm thinking of my neighborhood and when I go for walks I always look at people's chimneys now to see if I see smoke, or those heat waves. Last year, there was 1 person heating with wood using a 70's stove (my father). This year in my neighborhood there's 14 houses I know are burning wood and out of that 9 houses I suspect are 70's stoves that were dusted off, and 5 new EPA stoves. However, more EPA stoves are coming in each year. One particular house has my curiosity peaked, brand new install, full liner from the basement to the roof on the exterior, always has a little smoke coming out, and an unfamiliar smoke smell and no wood or fuel in site. I have to think it's coal! Coal hasn't been in our neighborhood for over 20 years, even 20 years ago there was probably only a couple people heating with it in our city and rare we had a coal burner living in our neighborhood. I found it exciting that our neighborhood may once again have a coal burner. Wish I could see it.
  10. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,248
    Loc:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Odd, I'm not sure It's coal then. Coal never smokes. I guess possible that it might have a little water vapor if the coal is wet, but not continuously. Hmmm...Not sure on this one.

    The smell from coal would be somewhat sulphury especially when a new load is put on. (do stokers exhibit this continuously?) Once the coal is lit, the smell is almost undetectable. (but that's anthricite...not sure of bitumonous)

    Is he perhaps burning the prefab logs that are made out of compressed cardboard? I think they're called Enviro-logs.

    http://www.enviro-log.net/index.htm
  11. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,746
    Loc:
    Central Sands, Wisconsin
    I can honestly say that I have never seen, nor do I know anyone that has a new/newer stove. I would like to see one in action someday. Even just being able to view the fire while it burns would be fascinating I think! I know a couple people that have outdoor boilers (or is it correctly called an outside hot water heating system?). So, an outside boiler is really all I can compare my stove to. I know that my stove uses less wood per year than one of those, but then my house is smaller too. Also, there's nothing like coming in the house from the barn on a cold snowy night and putting my feet up by Old Smokey. Can't get that kind of personal touch from a boiler outside, I don't suppose.
  12. Rhone

    Rhone Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Messages:
    824
    Thanks Warren that's good info. Last coal burner I saw was about 25 years ago. So coal doesn't smoke then it must be a wood stove and they're burning something other than wood. I don't think it's pellet, I don't think they smoke and wouldn't guess they'd have gone with double-insulated stainless chimney starting in the basement underground and go all the way some feet above their roof.

    They must be burning enviro-logs or pressure treated wood, painted wood, they're burning something for sure to have it smell like that. Maybe someday I'll have an opportunity to see a coal burner again.
  13. Rick

    Rick Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2005
    Messages:
    185
    Loc:
    Connecticut
    When I was growing up I had one friend whose dad had a coal stove. I didn't know anyone else who had a stove. When the pellet craze hit back in the 90's a bunch of my friends and family got those. Now I know a lot of people who have stoves, both pellet and wood. I would guess that the ratio is 8 to 3, new to old.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page