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How much wood will a pickup truck hold?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by brider, Jun 18, 2008.

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  1. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    That tractor looks aroundabout the same size as my JD2520 and Im going to be moving (hopefully, I've got it all set to jack up) a shed 10x14 that looks quite a bit like that one about 50 feet.

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  2. Carl

    Carl New Member

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    Good luck moving your shed. It should be no problem. This one is 20x12 with an 18x12 attached wood shed on the other side. No moving it. My tractor is orange :) but probably not much different than the green ones. It is a 16 hp which does everything I need. I purchased one of the first 16 hp Kubota's when they came out 30 or so years ago. Used it for everything including snowblowing 3 or 4 older folks drives for 20 years, then traded it in for the same as I had paid for it on this one a few years ago. Couldn't live without one of these 4x4 tractors with our driveway to keep open. I have been eying the rtv-900 but it doesn't have a bucket nor a lawn mower so that will have to wait.
  3. burntime

    burntime New Member

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    Well I got a load of oak tonight wet as heck, I had to stop at 90% of the load in the ranger...even with the helper coils shocks it was squatting pretty good. Like others have said it is slow and steady cause brakes were not meant to handle that kind of weight!!! Asshat...by me we call them assclowns :lol:
  4. Ncountry

    Ncountry Member

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    Back in my firewood dealing days . I started out using a 1986 hd3/4 ton ford. Built 2' racks and routinely delivered 3 face cord (~cord) cut 14"-16" with the back row stacked and the middle thrown in and rounded slightly and 4 face cord with 6 stacked rows 5 1/2'x4 1/4'. It was definitely not safe or legal, but it worked until I could afford a larger truck.
  5. Thomask9590

    Thomask9590 New Member

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    All I can tell you is watch the weight. I have a 2007 Toyota Tundra 5.7 V8 6 foot bed and I loaded it to the gills with maple, 75% water. I was settled on the leaf spring stops all the way home. :gulp: But that's what it's made for...right?? :-S . I told the guy to lighten the load the next time. :)
  6. burntime

    burntime New Member

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    I had loaded concrete retaining wall block called keystone in my ranger, used 2x4's over the frame stops...then added another 15 or so block at 110lbs a block, never again. It takes like a block to stop!!!
  7. N/A N/A

    N/A N/A New Member

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  8. Backroads

    Backroads Feeling the Heat

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    I work with a guy who told me he put 1 1/2 cords block in a F150!! I tried to correct him and he told me I didn't know what I was talking about. I just wish I was selling him the wood if you know what I mean. Anyways, I pick up a load of blocks in my F250SD with 6 1/2 bed, pack it in and stack it high in the middle and when I get it home and split and stack it amounts to just shy of two face cords. I WOULD NOT recommend putting that much in a truck any smaller than a 3/4 ton for safety purposes! Just my .02$.
  9. mayhem

    mayhem Minister of Fire

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    A cord and a half in any pickup bed is darn near impossible...mass aside I don't think you can get that much volume ontoa pickup and not have it all over the driveway when you pull out.

    That said I can easily toss about 2800-3000lb into my 3/4 ton Silverado and still be under my GVWR. I've probably put a solid 1/2-2/3 cord into the bed and hauled it without any drama.

    Bottom line is know your equipment.
  10. Toast

    Toast New Member

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    My wood guy uses a dump truck. I paid him $280 for a pile of Oak and Ash, split and delivered. When I stacked it, I had two stacks that measured 4'X16'...plus a little extra. So that was a "truck load"

    i wasn't sure what to expect but I think that was a fair deal.
  11. burntime

    burntime New Member

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    If the wood is 16 inchs you got 1.33 cord there. No idea what the going price is in your neck of the woods...Oak only here is approaching 300 bucks a cord and mixed is 250-280, think you did good by that measure.
  12. mayhem

    mayhem Minister of Fire

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    You'd probably never bend your axle, but I could see severe overloading snapping your springs. In order to do that to my truck I would probably have to put 3 or 4 tons in the bed, which I would never do.

    Just in case you think I'm overloading my truck though, the 3/4 ton rating does not mean its rated to hold a 1500lb load...maybe it did 50 years ago, but not anymore...its just a GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) classification...which is how much the truck is rated to weigh in total...truck, fluids, passengers and cargo. 3/4 ton menas 8600lb GVWR, so 8600lb - my 5600lb truck gives me about 3000lb safe and properly carrying capacity. 3/4 HD is 9200lb, 1 ton is 9600lb and so on. So my truck hauling 3000lb of whatever I put in the bed is right theer at the upper limit of its rated (and legal) capacity.

    Other factors also apply such as the GAWR of each axle, but you get the idea.
  13. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    So what makes you think that your truck weighs 5600 lbs, have you actually weighed it? I have weighed my weenie half ton on several occasions and depending on fuel load run 5800 lbs with no cargo. The folks with those noce big 2500s from GM are reporting 7000 lb empty weights. This still leaves a healthy 1600 lbs of cargo capacity for you though. Oddly, a ford ranger or toyota minitruck spec out to 1500 lbs of payload capacity as well. Properly spec'd (read a rare truck) you can get your curb weight down to almost what GM lists for the truck. We're talking 2wd, reg cab, small gas engine, etc.

    I have bent my axles. I also ruined a pinion bearing in my truck's rear end and when the men were rebuilding the axle they informed me that the axle tubes had been bent due to overloading but nod badly enough to trash the assembly. Between the pinion and bent tubes they concluded that I needed a much bigger truck.
  14. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    You most certainly can bend a rear axle housing...and you can break one. And you can ruin your rear axle shaft bearings. Regardless of what you do with suspension components, it's still the axle that has to transmit the entire load to the wheeels, tires, and the ground. The axle housing extension beyond the point of attachment of the suspension on both sides is the point of maximum bending stress. Beyond that, you've got the axle shaft bearings and the housing attachment to the wheels. It's the bending strength of the rear axle housing at those points that determines the load capacity of the vehicle. Beefing up the suspension will likely improve the fully loaded ride & handling, but that's a false indication of having more load capacity...you don't. The only real way to increase the load capacity is to replace the entire rear axle with a stronger one. Serious off-roaders, racers, and rock crawler builders/enthusiasts do this as a matter of routine, because they understand their vehicles' inherent structural limitations. Rick
  15. burntime

    burntime New Member

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    Anyone have some military axles that will fit my ranger?
  16. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Talk to these folks, burntime, I'm quite sure they'll be more than happy to fix you right up:

    http://www.currieenterprises.com/CESTORE/dana60.aspx

    ...and have your checkbook handy! :bug: Rick
  17. mayhem

    mayhem Minister of Fire

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    I have in fact weighed my truck on a couple dozen occasions. Our gravel pit charges by weight and they have you run over the scale before and lafter loading, weights are pirnted on the receipt...typically I come in around 5800-6000lb with myself as the sole passenger, the other major variable being how full my gas tank is.. I have seen it as low as 5600 when I stepped out and it was on fumes. Lots of possible variables out there in the trucking world that can determine weight though...could be alot of the guys you're talking about have deisel crew cab long beds...FWIW GM no longer makes a 3/4 ton truck...they're all 3/4HD's now and the GVWR is now 9200 across the board, so they're back up in the 2200lb carrying capacity if they're coming in a 7k vehicle weight.

    I agree with you though that there is not much point in a heavy duty pickup that can't even carry 2000lb in the bed...might as well save alot of money and go get a half ton.

    It may be relevant to note that my truck is a 2000 Silverado 2500 extended cab 4x4 with a 6.5' bed and a gas 6.0 motor, so I'm probably midrange in the vehicle weight category of all the 2500 variations made that year.
  18. burntime

    burntime New Member

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    Yep, can see it already, pull in a stock ranger with coil helpers, pull out a supercharged 351 (big block won't fit) and a big chunk on the home equity loan!!! I keep looking at the supercrew ranch kings...it may be time soon! Of course I would still do the coil helpers!!!! :cheese:
  19. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    "I agree with you though that there is not much point in a heavy duty pickup that can’t even carry 2000lb in the bed...might as well save alot of money and go get a half ton."

    Ack, the trouble is that my half ton at 5800 empty weight and GVWR of 6200 only has a payload of 400 lbs!!! Seriously, that's only two healthy ladies in the bed as cargo. Be very careful with half tons and cargo, they just don't spec them out for hauling. Better for towing a trailer.
  20. WES999

    WES999 Minister of Fire

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    I have a ford ranger and had to replace both rear leaf springs, (the bottom leaves cracked) I think it was from over loading with wood. Now I try to be careful and not fill up the bed all the way.
  21. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    More than enough, don't you think? (especially at my age!). :lol: Rick
  22. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Yep. I have a certified scale ticket in the glove compartment of my 2500 4WD Suburban that reads 7,216 pounds. Empty except for 165 lbs of me in it.

    When I went to register it for the first time the young lady said "Sir do your realize you bought a seven thousand pound truck.?". To which I replied "Yes. I bought it by the pound.".
  23. Backroads

    Backroads Feeling the Heat

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    Did this yesterday. This was one of the three loads I did. Almost all dead stand except for what was already cut. Guy told me I can cut all the dead stand I can haul!!!! I've got about two cords so far. Not bad considering it's going for $225 a cord on the low end.

    [​IMG]
  24. Thomask9590

    Thomask9590 New Member

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    Did the same with my Tundra this week end. She can pull the load O.K. but I'm not sure how many more loads the leaf springs can take. I snapped one on my last truck. :bug:
  25. Carl

    Carl New Member

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    I've driven lots of Toyota trucks and the back springs are rather weak. On the ones I know I will be loading down and keeping for a few years I usually have an extra spring leaf put in the back. This gives it a much better ride and it won't sag quite so bad. Don't know why they don't come from the factory with the extra spring. It has been a whining point for many years with them. :)
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