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How should i vent my new Pellet Stove??

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by gourash, Oct 13, 2010.

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  1. gourash

    gourash New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    Saybrook, Ohio
    I need some advice on how to vent my U.S. Stove #5510 Pellet stove into my existing fireplace.

    Current situation...

    I have a clay tile lined chimney with a wood stove insert currently in the fireplace.. no pipes just venting straight up... i know not exactly to code.. but that is the past...

    The chimney is on the exterior wall of my house

    I am replacing the wood burning insert with this pellet stove, it is not an insert. it will sit on the hearth in front of the opening of the fireplace.

    The installation instructions for the stove, clearly state that it is not to be vented directly into a masonry fireplace, my initial thought was well... if it is a lined chimney it should be ok... After reading their FAQ section on the their page.. it really has more to do with the size of the flue and exhaust not being expelled quickly enough due to the increased size of the flue. I guess i understand that.

    So i think these are my following choices ..

    1. I thought the easiest and least expensive option, would be to cut a rectangular opening through the fireplace to the outside and make a heavy steel (iron) rectangular insert to fit inside and help support the chimney, cover it with a flashing and make a round hole to pass the 3" pellet vent pipe straight through. i could make the rectangle large enough to also pass the optional (according tho them) fresh air intake pipe.

    Option 1 has me worried about the structural integrity of my chimney...if i cut the rectangle will it cause damage before i could put in the steel insert .... etc.... kind of scary...

    2. Purchase a chimney liner kit that consist of a flex pipe, top cap, collar and appliance adapter.. since this will be over 12' the manual says to increase the diameter of the pipe to 4" .. chimney liner option is around $320... however I am reading that this pipe should also be insulated in wood burning applications, which would add another $225 dollars to my cost. So now I am up to $545

    Option 2. Sounds expensive

    3. Purchase regular pellet Vent of 4" diameter with a top cap, chimney plate, 12' of straight pipe, tee with clean out, appliance reducer, etc.. This option is around $350.

    Option 3. Somewhat expensive but also worried about supporting that length of pipe inside the chimney from just the top?


    I would appreciate some advice from the experts that are here...

    Thanks
    John

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  2. Fish On

    Fish On Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    373
    Loc:
    The other Cape..
    Why not just buy an insert and be done.
  3. jtakeman

    jtakeman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2008
    Messages:
    13,502
    Loc:
    Northwestern CT.
    Option 2 should due. I don't think you need to insulate it as there isn't any combustables. Check the local code or go by what the manual says. Don't forget to add a tee to ease cleaning.

    It may just be cheaper to stick the stove on another wall and poke a hole for the vent. Keep the woodstove for back up. You'll have something when the power cuts out.
  4. Xena

    Xena Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Messages:
    2,491
    Loc:
    South Shore MA
    My stove is installed like your option 2.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  5. defield

    defield New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Messages:
    433
    Loc:
    South Central Maine
    John,

    My stove is installed very very similar to Xena's.

    The only difference is insulation to seal off the opening where the flexible 4" SS goes through the fireplace damper area. Also sealed at the top of the chimney with a cap.

    I did not want an insert. Used to have a freestanding wood stove in front of the fireplace and liked the looks and ease of getting at things.

    Thought of venting through an outside wall, but the wife wanted to use the existing chimney and who am I to argue! :)

    There are blogs on this site from members who have gone through the back of an existing fireplace for an outside vent. This site has an excellent search engine.

    What is the chimney made of? Brick, stone, cement block, a combination of brick and block? A good mason can inspect and advise on the integrity of the fireplace and chimney and risks involved. Don't skimp on safety.

    keep us posted please.

    Good luck,

    Ranger
  6. jtp10181

    jtp10181 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    3,724
    Loc:
    Madison, WI
    You dont need insulation on a pellet liner. Only for a wood insert or stove.
  7. dac122

    dac122 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    Messages:
    348
    Loc:
    Upstate NY
    option 2 has the added advantage of a strong draft with fewest connections. and from what i understand not that difficult to do. don't know why you would need to insulate other than near the damper to keep out cold air.
  8. imacman

    imacman Guest

    I agree with others opinion of using option #2.

    As for up-sizing to 4", easiest way is to get a 3" --> 4" appliance adapter. Then the 4" cleanout T, and then the 4" flex pipe kit to the top of the chimney. Flex pipe doesn't need to be insulated......the chimney is actually doing this for you. Just make sure you seal off where the flex pipe goes past the damper shelf.

    EDIT: Ooops, almost forgot the female flex adapter that goes into the top of the T to attach the flex pipe to.
  9. gourash

    gourash New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    Saybrook, Ohio
    All,

    Thanks for all your responses, I had no idea anyone responded, thought i was supposed to get an email about that, i will check my settings.

    believe chimney is all brick.

    My brother has a life long friend that is a mason, i am going to have him stop by next week and tell me what the thinks about punching at least one and maybe two (fresh air) through the back of the chimney.

    otherwise, i am going to go with option 2. flex vent straight up, with the appropriate caps and tees. As far as insulation. I have also read that many are sealing off the damper area with a plate and filling the chimney space with perlite. seems much cheaper.

    Plan on making decisions by Wed 10-27 and purchasing materials.

    oh yeah, have to extend the hearth too.. stove to deep! but that and pipe done, i should be set for several years.

    Have a Magnum Baby country side in girlfriends all electric house, I love that thing and what it did to our electric bill!!! paying less than half with the cost of pellets and much much warmer! plus i can power with a generator. before i calculated i need at least a 15kw gen for just the furnace!

    I will keep you posted.

    Thanks again ,

    John
  10. vvvv

    vvvv New Member

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    MAINE
    by code maybe but pellets burn into CO2 + H2O & if the top of that liner dont hit 212*f is there gonna be condensation?
  11. jtp10181

    jtp10181 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    3,724
    Loc:
    Madison, WI
    Sure it might, in a SS liner. Whats it going to hurt? I doubt much of anything will condesate against the liner walls except on a shutdown.
  12. Pellet-King

    Pellet-King Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2008
    Messages:
    1,299
    Loc:
    Northern Ct
    Cheapest way out, 8 feet of SS flexpipe, a T and a block off plate for the damper area, did that for 8 years at my old house, only problem is ash buildup on blockoff plate area.
    Pellet stoves only blow out hot air, let your flue do the rest.
    I moved and now have a liner kit to the top of my chimney, about 20' and it's only 3" all the way, the top is sealed off with a plate and cap and I didn't think of insulating the damper, can any insulation work?, the top plate is silicone sealed and there is no draft of cold air coming down that i can feel.
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