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How to, load up and burn for a long/ overnight burn ???

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by HDRock, Nov 7, 2012.

  1. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    I have been searching this site looking for info on running a smoke Dragon.
    There is a lot of information about running the newer stoves but, not much on the older stoves.

    Generally during the day. I build a good hot fire and put in a couple logs every hour or so.
    1: Is this the right way for a smoke Dragon?

    2:The main question is, what sizes,( large,, medium,, small, or mixed) pieces of wood do you use to load up for long burn, without burning your house down?

    3: What are the biggest pieces of wood that you use 5,6,7,8 inches?

    4: What do you start with, and already hot fire with a bed of coals?

    5: Where do you set your air intake And your damper?

    6: When it is loaded up for a long burn and running, what is the average temperature on the flue pipe?

    I know there are some variables here, whether, wood, stove type, etc..
    I did not grow up burning wood so, the only way I learn is from trial and error, or places like this . Great site.

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  2. geoxman

    geoxman Feeling the Heat

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    Is your stove an Orley?
  3. Coal Reaper

    Coal Reaper Minister of Fire

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    i just picked up an old fire view like yours a few weeks ago. i will be hooking it up in pole barn. i expect it to pump out a lot of heat. how is yours?
  4. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    No a Fire View,see my signature EDIT found a pic of an Orley, it is similar
    I was wondering if anyone on here had ,or has one.
    This stove will put out more than enough heat for my house on the coldest days, I can put a 3 foot log in this puppy.
    There is another stove I have seen on here called a Fire View, that;s nothing like mine.
    If U looked at my sig yours is like mine
  5. Coal Reaper

    Coal Reaper Minister of Fire

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    i need to order a boot to go through the steel roof

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  6. bluedogz

    bluedogz Minister of Fire

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    I spent a couple years burning an antiquated Sierra dragon, and learned some hard and expensive lessons.

    1: Yes, this will work ASSUMING you have properly seasoned wood. If you have doubt or don't know what that means, read more here. The down side is that you're burning much more wood than you need to.

    2: Long burn is about, among other things, air control. You're gonna have a hard time getting anything like what we'd call a "long" burn out of that stove; it's not designed for it. That's a bit like asking how to maximize the cargo capacity of a Vokswagen- it's just not made for that.

    3: See #1. In my experience, smaller is better.

    4: Not sure what the question is... throwing splits on a hot fire OR bed of coals is generally fine.

    5: Different for every stove. I had no flue damper, and kept my air intake open no more than about 25% or so on a hot fire, 100% for starting.

    6: No idea, sorry; never used a stack therm.

    Assuming you are scrounging wood and not paying for it... start laying up wood to season AND save your pennies for an EPA stove. I coughed up for the 30 and instantly started using less than half the wood my dragon did for WAY more heat.

    If you are paying for wood, learn to scrounge.
  7. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Thanks bluedogz
    Thanks bluedogz, Appreciate it
    This is kind what I thought, ( You're gonna have a hard time getting anything like what we'd call a "long" burn out of that stove; it's not designed for it. That's a bit like asking how to maximize the cargo capacity of a Vokswagen- it's just not made for that)
    Reading how people run the new stoves ,confused me.
    I can get a longer burn with bigger stuff ,and choke it down,but it's still a hot fire
    I am paying for wood,and I scrounge some but not enough.
    I have big trees that need to come down close to house, so I have to pay for getting them down
    Last year I flipped the switch and didn't burn at all.

    Wow ! That's a big difference. Using less than half the wood my dragon did for WAY more heat,
  8. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Where can you get that kind of boot ?
  9. Coal Reaper

    Coal Reaper Minister of Fire

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    Pipebootexpress.com
  10. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    1. Whatever it takes. Smaller, hotter fires are cleanest burning.

    2.Largest you can fit for longest burn, with smaller stuff in between, the goal being to fill the box as much as possible

    3, The largest size I can fit in my stove.

    4. Big bed of coals before last reload. Rake some of them towards the stove door.

    5. Hard telling, not knowing.

    6. See 5.
  11. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Sorry for the dumb questions
    I should have been more clear. This question , 3: What are the biggest pieces of wood that you use 5,6,7,8 inches? What I meant was diameter
  12. firecracker_77

    firecracker_77 Minister of Fire

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    I think for a long burn, the largest diameter that will stay lit over a hot bed of coals. Choke the air down as much as possible...better yet, choke back the damper if you have one. I'm not sure how much wood you go through, but it's expensive enough to consider a switch to a 30 maybe at some point.
  13. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Thanks ,firecracker
    From your experience, Whats the the largest diameter that will stay lit over a hot bed of coals ?
    I just burned three splits, about 7" dia. 18" long, and the burn time was 4 1/2 hours, does that sound like average for a dragon ?
    I do have a damper ,and I close it almost all the way with the sliding air control just under half way open.
    Im going get a , new stove for sure, maybe a 30 but, it isn't in the budget this winter, I only recently found out how much more efficient the new stoves are
  14. rkshed

    rkshed Feeling the Heat

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    I have an old smoke dragon and see little reason to upgrade other than a newer stove might have a "purty" color.
    I burn my uglies over night and jam as much else in as will fit. All on a nice hot bed of coals. Air intakes closed to 1/2 turn open and it idles at 300 all night.
    The most important part is to make sure your wood is seasoned.
    If you do run little air overnight, keep an eye on creosote in the liner. cant be too safe.
  15. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    The biggest I can fit in my stove. Really.
    Assuming a good big bed of coals, and lots of smaller fill in pieces, the largest chunk you can fit in will indeed burn.

    I split nothing under six inches, and always keep a few 8-9 inch rounds as "all nighters". (of course I allow years for them to season)
  16. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Thanks every one

    Dune, I was ! wondering before how small to split to
    Dang, does that run on 220, Home built 30 ton electric splitter;
  17. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    Yep, 10 HP Baldor draws 42 amps at 220 volts.
  18. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    Don't go by me, I had 3 years worth of wood on hand before I installed my stove.
    I split the way I do because I have the time to season rounds and I don't like splitting much,
    plus I cut all the way down to 1" diameter so I have no need of small splits.
    Many folks on here split stuff as small as 3", and when you are first starting out, this may be a good idea, as the smaller splits season faster.
    I am just too lazy to go this route.

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