How to Properly Test Wood Moisture Content

thephotohound Posted By thephotohound, Aug 20, 2007 at 11:43 AM

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  1. begreen

    begreen
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    You can split the oak again and that will hasten the drying, but getting some more dry wood is a good plan.

    At that price, if it's split and as advertised, you're stealing it. That's a great deal, even for a face cord. I think you should get at least 4 face cords though. Or a couple full cords. Just be sure it's really dry. Bring your splitter and the moisture meter and perform the same test and don't be afraid to walk away if it's not dry.
     
  2. thephotohound

    thephotohound
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    Thanks for the confidence... Will do.
     
  3. babalu87

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    It works but it makes my cheeks hurt :D
     
  4. Bill

    Bill
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    I tried the soap thing also, but I put the wrong end in my mouth, that soap had a nasty taste.
     
  5. got wood?

    got wood?
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    $50/cord in MA?? Mind telling me where? I am seeing only $250!
     
  6. jqgs214

    jqgs214
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    Blowing through the split works but I dont have a moisture meter so I have no clue if it indicates the wood is dry or not.
     
  7. Todd

    Todd
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    Must be dry enough. The theory is, if its dry your blowing through the cells of the wood like a straw, so it will produce bubbles on the other end. You won't be able to blow air through if the cells are full of water.
     
  8. thephotohound

    thephotohound
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    I guess I was lucky enough to find a guy who happened to have a cord and quit burning wood... Keep in mind, though that I haven't seen the wood yet........
     
  9. jqgs214

    jqgs214
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    But how dry 20%, 29%? I wonder at what % you can start to blow through it. Ok moisture meter owners please let me know!
     
  10. Bill

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    All right I'll try it this weekend, but if I get a sliver in my lip I am not going to be happy. Being the safety conscious person I am, I'll put the end of the log in a bucket of water, and jam my air chuck in it and see if I get bubbles.
     
  11. jqgs214

    jqgs214
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    Ok but record the dryness of the wood with the moisture meter. If you can blow through it and its 30% I'm screwed :)
     
  12. Bill

    Bill
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    Sounds like a good experiment. I'll drill a hole in the wood, to fit the air chuck into the wood. Otherwise I'll get blow back, instead of air trying to penetrate the wood. I also have a moisture meter, lets check back Monday, I'll post my results.
     
  13. jqgs214

    jqgs214
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    But you air chuck can blow alot harder than I can. How about going the sanitary route and putting a straw in the hole?
     
  14. babalu87

    babalu87
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    Compressed air will blow any air out of the tubes in the wood and give you a false "positive"
    I dont know how many PSI I can blow but I am sure it isnt very much and NO I am not going to blow into a tire pressure gauge to see.

    SANITARY?!?!?!
    I wood think your wood pile is fairly clean dang anti-microbial hippies are creating monster virus'
     
  15. Bill

    Bill
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    I'll turn the pressure down to 5 lbs.
     
  16. jqgs214

    jqgs214
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    man, do you have lips? you really dont wanna blow into a piece of wood do ya :p
     
  17. babalu87

    babalu87
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    I have and have

    Wipe it down with a little vinegar if your worried, hell I have probably eaten plenty while cutting trees especially when I have just done the rakers on the chain ;)
     
  18. jqgs214

    jqgs214
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    I tried it last year with the cord I bought from my wod guy. It made bubbles. But I have know idea if thats a good measure for dry wood. If Smokey comes through with a half way decent experiment I'll save the $20.00 on a moisture meter and just blow (I'll leave the rest out.) ;)
     
  19. BrotherBart

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    Every year when this comes up I get this mental images of hundreds of people going around behind the woodpile where nobody can see them and blowing into the end of a split.

    "George! What the hell are you doing"

    "Seeing if the wood's dry dear."

    "Right. If the cops see you you will be blowing into a Breathalyzer. My mother was right about you!"



    BTW: I have tried it before and it works.
     
  20. Harley

    Harley
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    If anyone is going to do this experiment (not with the compressor)..... PLEASE take some pictures, and post them.
     
  21. Gooserider

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    IIRC my SCUBA training from years back, the human body can suck or blow about 1/2 to 1 PSI of pressure (This is why a 6' long snorkel won't work...)

    However the other thought is if you say an aircompressor will blow the moisture out of the tubes, would this be a way to do forced high speed drying? It would be cool to be able to go from green to ready to burn in 30 seconds or less... :coolsmirk:

    Gooserider
     
  22. GeeWizMan

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    Oh my goodness! This is way too funny! :lol: Blowing bubbles to see if the wood is dry - absolutely great! I am going to give it a try today and test it with my Harbor Freight moisture meter. I have nothing better to do anyway other than building an ark as it is raining and raining and raining around these parts and I have been chomping at the bit to get out and work the wood. So, instead of felling, limbing, bucking, splitting, hauling, and stacking, I'll be blowing: Take a deep breath :snake:

    George
     
  23. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg
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    This post could end up in the ash can real quick.. What can one conjure up thinking about blowing logs?

    I know too funny to pass on. Then the pressure we can create with our own lips. This is an average? I know some are more gifted at this than others
    Mick might have an advantage Monica is a proven comodity...

    I thiunk there are real unscientific way to tell when the wood is dry enough one can feel the extra weight. experience looking at a piece and lifting it one can pretty much guess if it is dry enough the color bark falling off weight check marks ant hiting it against another piece to hear a ring all ways to tell if it is ready.
    the final way is the hissing in the wood stove helps determine your methods.
     
  24. Havlat24

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    I can see how the blowing trick can work. Free Water, (water stored in the wood cell cavities) is removed first in the drying process, and the bound water ( water stored in the cell walls) is removed last, when this process starts, it would creates spaces between the cells, in which you could possibily blow through.....although thats a bit of a wierd way of doing it....it would work...in theory..haha
     
  25. Bill

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    I use to know a gal that had more than one psi, but then again that's another story. I'm not taking a picture of me with a log in my mouth and posting it on the web. But I'll try some wet wood and dry wood and see what happens. One of the considerations is how long is the firewood cut. My 22" logs will differ from a 16" log. But maybe we can gestimate a rule of thumb or is that rule of lip?
     
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