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how u doing on next years pile?????

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by argus66, Jan 22, 2009.

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  1. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    We have somewhere between 20 and 30 cords.

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  2. pulldownclaw

    pulldownclaw Feeling the Heat

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    Got 3 cords of oak split and stacked in the last few months, hope it's done seasoning by next year, it's no joke how long it takes. Have another 2 laying around unsplit. Gotta get busy because we have blown thru alotta wood this year.

    Stejus, how wide is that HH? I made mine 7' diameter/7' tall and it worked out well. It seemed to me that if it was much wider it would be hard to reach in to stack in the center, unless you use the "just throw it in the middle" method.
  3. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    fyrwoodguy real nice grapple but I could lift those twigs with my johnson tool.
  4. fyrwoodguy

    fyrwoodguy Feeling the Heat

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    thanks for the compliment on my grapple ! but can your johnson lift a grapple load to a time as pictured? at once??????

    the twigs are loaded by hand.....off load with grapple
  5. Chief Ryan

    Chief Ryan New Member

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    Somewhere i read that you go through about 3 cord per year. 20 to 30 Cord!!!!!! Your a.......SAVAGE :)

    This is my first year burning a stove. I've used it 24/7 since November and at night through October. I think i'll only go through 3 cord myself most likely less. I have about 6 to 7 cord split and stacked ready for the next 2 years.
  6. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos Minister of Fire

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    I'm so happy for all you guys. :coolcheese:
  7. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    is that with a 5100 i hope
  8. Roxburyeric

    Roxburyeric Member

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    Western Connecticut
    I have 4 cords of oak and maple split and stacked, but based on this year I'll need another 2 cords. I'll probably run out this year at the end of February, then I'll have to decide if I start burning next years wood. We'll see what happens - First year and learning alot. Thanks all.
  9. waynek

    waynek Member

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    I am not one to get to far ahead with putting up wood as there is too many distractions. 3 cords are ranked up in the woodshed and there is another 3 to 4 cords split up in the woods. Heavy snow came early in November and was not worth the risk of breaking equipment or bones bringing it off the hills. Come green up it will be brought to the homestead. This has happened to me before and it just creates another problem... that is dealing with rattlesnakes that sometimes take residence in the woodpiles. Typically, I burn 7 to 8 cords per year. Since the 1960s I have only come up short 3 or 4 times thats when I go to plan B, which is to buy slabwood bundles from the local sawmills. Winter of 1976-1977 was really a bad year and was only able to purchase one slabwood bundle so I had to resort to Plan C. Cut and burn standing White Ash.
  10. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    Just joking with ya fyrwoodguy I'll bet the helpers just love helping out...when their that age anything to so that has a motor is fun.
  11. Ken45

    Ken45 Minister of Fire

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    I have about two cord bucked but not split. I expect we will have at least one cord left over this year, so we should be close to having enough for next year.

    I'm hoping to get in enough to get at least a couple of years ahead. That would be nice :)

    Ken
  12. fyrwoodguy

    fyrwoodguy Feeling the Heat

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    i kinda knew that,but i just could'nt resist......betcha you could'nt either :)
  13. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Thanks Chief. I knocked down another big ash this morning. So the pile just keeps growing. Actually this is the first I've cut since that cold spell and today the temperature is up around 30 so I grabbed the saw and cut away.

    Just looking right now it does look like we will go through a little over 3 cords this winter. But this is the type of winter when we burned 7 cords or more with a different stove. Man I love that Fireview.

    Chief, that sounds great that you have 6-7 cords ready. Now you are a real wood burner!
  14. Valhalla

    Valhalla Minister of Fire

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    I am working on the wood for winter 2010-11 and beyond.
  15. Chief Ryan

    Chief Ryan New Member

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    All of the wood was scrounged. Tomorrow i will be cutting some from a ladies house around the corner who probably has about 10 cords all in logs. Hope to get a few of them :)
  16. rayburn

    rayburn New Member

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    East Vincent Pa
    Probably about 4 cords of red oak, maple, black walnut ,red elm and poplar so far for next year.I would like to have about 6 to seven cords by the end of February for next season.
  17. djslim

    djslim New Member

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    Man you guys all make me feel like a real slacker, I have only about a cord bucked and thrown in a big pile right now. Hopefully have a cord left over from this season to carry over to next. Maybe find the "big score" this year and get a full year or two ahead. Should have some more time on my hands in the next couple months and try to hit it hard so iam not cutting in the middle of july like last year. Way too hot to be cutting.
  18. mbokie5

    mbokie5 New Member

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    I've gone through everything I had. I'm scrounging for more. Got two dead trees yesterday and it will keep me going for now.

    Got tired of not being prepared and bought a splitter before Xmas. Only got to use it once. I am probably going to need a bigger chainsaw as well.

    But next winter, my goal is to have two years set aside and that means about 20 - 24 cords.
  19. iceman

    iceman Minister of Fire

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    are you kidding????? what are you heating with that you need 10-12 coed a year?
  20. argus66

    argus66 Feeling the Heat

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    central coastal nj
    i just got a huge load from a golf course down the road. mostly oak and maple.
  21. mbokie5

    mbokie5 New Member

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    Whatever I can get with the exceptions I mentioned earlier. My stove is inefficient and I burn it hot so I can turn on the fan in the furnace. I could have had a lot more wood, but didn't pick it up because there was already way too much in the yard unprocessed. I live in town. Our stove will take 28" wood.
  22. Ken45

    Ken45 Minister of Fire

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    I have read that trying to move stove heat around with the furnace fan is quite inefficient due to duct leaks, heat loss, etc. My own experience agrees with that.

    What I do find effective is to put a fan on the floor near the doorway (we use just the small 10-12" fans), blowing floor air OUT of the rooms that need heat. That pulls in the warmer air in without having to hang fans in the doorway itself. Even the small fans on low do a good job of moving cold air out and warm air into a room.

    Ken
  23. mbokie5

    mbokie5 New Member

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    Yeah, it's inefficient, but it's better than nothing and it does help to evacuate heat from the room with the stove and it does move some heat.

    I have an oscillating fan as well, like you suggested.

    I need a better stove and better circulation and that's going to get my attention next.
  24. waynek

    waynek Member

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    I realize everyone can not move the heat without mechanical assistance, but when I purchased my 1915 two-story brick "4 square" house several years ago I established a thermosiphon of air. First I lined the two flue chimney that served the first floor fireplace and forced air furnace in the basement. Poked a hole in the flue just above the fireplace, masoned in an attractive chimney thimble and installed a wood heater. Power vented the forced air furnace in the basement, rebuilt the thimble and installed a wood heater. Over a period of several weeks I scrounged several iron floor registers from razed victorian homes. The largest register was about 3 x 4 feet. I cut out the flooring above the wood heater in the basement and placed this register in the opening.

    Then I installed the other registers in the upstairs rooms, placing them under each window. I wanted to install registers on the first floor, but my wife stopped me. "Let's see if this thermosiphon idea of yours works for the first and second floor before we cut openings into the basement." My better half was doubting my vast knowledge of physics. My theory was that the open stairwell to the second floor would act as a thermal chimney, warming the 2nd floor rooms. Cool or cold air from the windows would sink through the floor registers and be drawn to the stove on the first floor. This cool or cold air drawn and sinking through the registers would in turn draw warmer air from the upstairs central hallway into each room to complete my thermosiphon cycle. Suffice to say it does work and when the house guests ask about the cute antique registers in the room ceilings (or floors), the wife "expertly" explains the purpose and function.

    Not satisfied to let this approval rating from my wife to go to waste, I expanded my work. As mentioned, heretofore, I have a wood heater in the basement with this large antique register directly above it. Without register openings into the basement, I wasn't sure if I could complete a thermosiphon cycle. By firing the basement stove with the register overhead opened fully, I could get heat into the first floor, up the stairwell to the second floor, but the question remained how to get the cold air back to the basement stove. Well I cut a hole in the basement door, installed a "modern" register, cut holes in the first and second floor boxed in laundry chute and installed "modern" registers in each opening.

    If temperature does not drop below 25 degrees and the wind is not blowing, the basement stove will heat the entire house comfortably. Below 25 degrees the basement stove is not fired...the first floor stove is fired up and it will take care of the heating needs.
  25. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Hmmm... Getting a bit off the thread topic, if this goes to far afield I may split the thread, but... What you describe sounds effective, and is very much the way that folks did it back in the "bad olde days" However it is arguably (if you search back a ways you'll find some serious arguements about it!) a violation of modern code standards and safety hazard. Do a search on "Expressway to disaster" for more details, but in essence the idea is that IF chit happens and you have a fire or smoke problem then those registers will act to spread the fire and or fumes much more rapidly - possibly causing a deadly threat at a time when seconds count... A part of what goes into modern code requirements is "containment", or making floors / walls designed to act as temporary barriers to flame so as to increase the time available to evacuate - poking holes in them for registers breaches that integrity. At the same time the code is not 100% clear as to whether registers of this sort are prohibited or not, and what the exact requirements for them are if they are OK... One thing that has been suggested is the use of thermal closures, I forget the exact term, but they are a set of spring loaded louvers held open with a catch that melts if it gets to hot, blocking flame spread. Doesn't do anything for a smoke / CO problem but may help for fire safety....

    Gooserider
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