1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Hunting Dog Thread

Post in 'The Inglenook' started by Huntindog1, Sep 9, 2013.

  1. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,437
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    All you trainers of hunting dogs I know you put alot of time and energy into training them. I am sure your proud of them. So post pics of your pride and joy hunting dogs.

    When I was younger I trained Beagles and competition hunted them. I was a certified AKC judge for UBGF Beagle Trials. Then got into English Setter Bird Dogs. Here in Southern Indiana we have Hoosier National Forest home to some good grouse hunting. I had a Ryman Setter and an Old Hemlock Setter the more old fashioned type Grouse hunting English Setters. My best setter I owned was my Ryman Setter. Here is a good picture of a Ryman Setter not my Ryman but this one was the Great Aunt of my Ryman setter and they looked exactly the same you wouldnt be able to tell them apart.

    RymanSetter.JPG
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2013
    Mrs. Krabappel likes this.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Gary_602z

    Gary_602z Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2009
    Messages:
    930
    Loc:
    Lake Odessa,MI
    Heck my Golden Retriever is so gun shy that he tries to come in the house when he sees a gun or hears a loud noise. But he is real good at going into the cornfield around our house to get a ear of corn to chew on!:)
    I have trained him to come to his food dish or come inside to see the GIRLS (Pit Bull and Golden Doodle)!:)

    Gary

    But he is hell on tennis balls!
  3. Hearth Mistress

    Hearth Mistress Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    852
    Loc:
    Pt Pleasant, PA (SE PA)
    My older Jack Russell Terrier isn't much of a hunter, he likes to steal potatoes and hid them in the sofa cushions for later. My younger JRT will pounce on anything that moves, and more like a cat than a dog when it cones to mice. They have caught and played tug of war with mice but other than that, not much else.

    I have a huge respect for true working breeds and hunting dogs. As kids we had a neighbor who trained dogs for game birds. I have barely trained mine to sit/stay let alone go get that bird and bring it hear without ripping it apart (what they do to toads- ewww)
  4. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,568
    Loc:
    Blue Ridge Mountains NC
    My father used to hunt pheasants. We grew up with English setters, so they will always hold a special place in my heart. Thanks for the trip along memory lane.

    My son's childhood dog is a 90lb furry sheepdog. I tell him he's forever spoiled for reasonably sized dogs with reasonable hair.
    Hearth Mistress likes this.
  5. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,437
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    Human population is getting such that there arent alot of places to hunt anymore. Especially with bird dogs. No habitat left. Its a dying old sport. Afraid to say.

    The Rymans and Old Hemlock English setters where the Gentleman's Shooting dog throw back to the old setters before field trials bred them to be wide hunters and very energetic. These setters where ones you could walk behind and hunt Grouse and Quail. Bred mostly in Northern Pennsylvania for rich clients out of New York City. George Ryman was the man famous for these dogs. Then George Bird Evans created his Old Hemlock breed from select Rymans over the years. As GBE grew up hunting over Ryman setters with his Father. Then GBE became famous with the Bird Dog community for his Books he wrote about his adventures training dogs and hunting Ruff Grouse in the Mountains.

    George Ryman would take wealthy clients up into Canada hunting Grouse over his best Setters, thats one way he made a living.

    I just found that there is a book out, that I need to add it to my collection as I have several of GBE's books signed by him. This new book is by someone else and its about the evolution of the Ryman Setter.

    I miss my setters they really were a special breed of English Setter.

    http://www.bonasapress.com/A_Gentlemans_Shooting_Dog.cfm


    [​IMG]


    Then here is pic pic of George Bird Evans and his wife and a couple of their dogs.

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2013
  6. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Messages:
    3,736
    Loc:
    NNJ
    I have a ridgeback lab mix that is dying to run and chase something when we go outside. Is there some sort of reasonable outlet for him to release this hunting energy that we can provide him. Maybe sheep herding, but he's not a herding dog...............
  7. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,437
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    Well I guess no one has Hunting Dog Pics to Share.

    This type of Hunting dying out quicker than I thought, LoL.

    I think everyone is into Deer hunting, as thats what I have seen around my area.

    I dont hunt as much anymore either, always cutting wood in the woods instead.

    Must be , as you would think Wood Stove , Wood Cutting people grew up with Hunting Dogs and they may have, but if you spend alot of time out cutting wood you dont have much time to mess with Training Hunting Dogs.

    As my grandfather would say to train a dog you got to wear out a pair boots or two.

    Dogs dont get trained sitting around the wood stove.:)
  8. ironpony

    ironpony Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,777
    Loc:
    mid-ohio
    P1010048.JPG not trained hunters but I find it amazing as to what they do naturally. Otis the Rott. rescue has a very high prey drive, actually chases the ducks and geese as they fly over. Hailey the St bernard mix can track anything down that has passed through the yard/woods, has treed animals and on occasion caught some.. Thier sense of smell is amazing, when we had our basset wow that dog could track anything.
  9. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Loc:
    Indiana
    Here's my "bird dog". He doesn't hunt birds so much as he doesn't allow them in the yard.

    I got him from a breeder that turns out a lot of service dogs (for the blind, military, bomb sniffers, contraband, etc) and a lot of good waterfowl dogs. He is from their service dog lines. Pretty big for a lab (85-90 lbs when he's leaned out). He has an amazing nose for a lab too...not a blood-hound but you can take a walnut...put a little mark on it....and throw it into the holler full of a thousand other walnuts. He'll bring back the same walnut every time (or stay down there trying until you call him back).

    We got him to be a family pet, but he would have made one heck of a hunting/working dog. I've heard of guys who train dogs to run looking for antler sheds and always thought he would be good at that too. Could never be a hog dog...wouldn't know what to do with a wild animal except for play with it.

    2011-12-31_10-47-31_285.jpg
  10. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,437
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    Before I got into Bird Dogs I followed around alot of Beagles. I competition hunted them in United Beagle Gun Dog Federation Trials.

    Here is a nice pictorial slide show that was done at the local beagle club I used to frequent back in my Beagle days.

  11. JOHN BOY

    JOHN BOY Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2012
    Messages:
    532
    Loc:
    Western Mountains ,NC
    I will post a pick of Jack.. My Jack Russell If he gets to it its as good as dead.. He isnt afraid of anything . He hasnt been trained to hunt , but can tell he's a natural.
  12. flhpi

    flhpi Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Loc:
    Southern Ohio
    I had a mountain cur named Cy. He was hell on squirrels, opossum, mice, rabbits and coon. He would unstack my wood piles from the top down to get to the critter. Great drive.

    It was enjoyable to help him pull a brush pile apart to get to his prey, good bonding for the two of us. When he saw a gun he would start jumping around knowing it was time to hunt. In his later years he kept his distance from the louder guns during target practice but head into the woods and he didn't care. He was a hell of a dog and greatly missed.
    JOHN BOY likes this.
  13. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,437
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    Dogs get pretty smart. They know the tone of your tires humming on the road. If I ever lost my Treeing Walkers I would just get in the truck and drive around they would come to the sound of the tires. Or you can leave your hunting coat laying on the ground and next morning they would be sleeping on it. You would get so before you went to the Kennels you drop the tail gate and open the dog box you then go to the kennels and just open the door and they sprint and jump 3 feet high up onto the tail gate and right into the dog box, like lets go!
  14. DaveGunter

    DaveGunter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2011
    Messages:
    93
    Loc:
    coastal maine
    Here are my three, none of them trained hunting dogs. Left is, half Walker hound, center is beagle/lab, and right is Jack Russell/beagle. My question is how do you get them to not track the game? When we are out hiking it can get kind of annoying. If it's a varmint then the chase is to the nearest hole or tree and pretty much over. If it's a deer they can be long gone before you know it. I've got them all on GPS collars so I can track them, and field bells on the collars to hopefully give the critters a heads up, seems to work ok, they generally won't give chase unless they see the animal. They are great at keeping the wood stacks clear of critters, esp the Jack-a-bea, that dog is a relentless nose with an attitude.
    hearth avatar 3.jpg
    titude.
    Huntindog1 likes this.
  15. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,437
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    Dave, those 3 have looks on them that are so serious, Lol.

    Plus I see your in Maine, I always wanted to visit Maine. I might some day.

    I know a person that moved there as its supposed to be a very pollution free area of the country. Maybe they were wrong but thats what they said.

    I watch that Maine Conversation Law show on Animal Planet. Lots of Moose up there I see from that show.
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2013
  16. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,437
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    Here is a pic of an Old Hemlock Blue Belton English Setter Bird Dog.

    The black runs thru their hair such that in person it looks blue-ish.

    This pic reminds me of the one I had who I called Jackson.

    Old Hemlock Setter.JPG
  17. NortheastAl

    NortheastAl Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2012
    Messages:
    676
    Loc:
    Putnam, NY
    image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg Here's some pics or our Pointer mix, Boomer. He loves sitting in a lawnchair. Does this for hours on end. He was a rescue from South Carolina.

Share This Page