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I fired up my new stove, and the wall gets very hot. Is it safe?

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by RedNeck Wrangler, Aug 8, 2008.

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  1. RedNeck Wrangler

    RedNeck Wrangler New Member

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    I installed me new Timber Ridge 55-TRP10 pellet stove today. And I fired it up for the first time. The minimum side clearance is 6". I have it at 7". The wall is wood paneling and it got very hot to the touch. Is this safe?

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  2. BignBeefy

    BignBeefy Member

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    6 inches? The p68 needs at least 22 or something. Is that with side shields?
  3. cncpro

    cncpro New Member

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    From the Timber Ridge 55-TRP10 manual...

    Should be OK... My Quad CB1200 stove is 6" from the wall and the stove's side panel got pretty hot but the wallpaper was just warm.

    Is it possible you're running it too hot ?

    Hey, if your forum name is CB1200 why do you have the Timber Ridge stove ?
  4. RedNeck Wrangler

    RedNeck Wrangler New Member

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    I had a Quadra Fire on order but canceled it because I got a good deal on the Timber Ridge. I'm only running it on the number 5 setting it goes all the way to 9.
  5. Souzafone

    Souzafone Feeling the Heat

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    I wouldn't trust that set up. The wall, or anything else for that matter, shouldn't get hot. How hot will that paneling get when the stove is running on high for a whole day? Besides safety, efficiency must be bad if you've got a wall absorbing all that heat. I would move the stove or the wall, don't neglect safety.
  6. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Obvious point here, but walls, stoves and everything else get much hotter when the weather is not cold outside.......MUCH hotter. Very hot to the touch? If you can put your hand on it for more than 2 or 3 seconds, it is probably under 130F. The wall can safely get to about 160 or higher.
  7. lessoil

    lessoil Minister of Fire

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    We are doing a corner install which has 13" clearance without shields and 9" with.
    We opted to go without the shields so we might get some "ambient" heat from the sides.
    Our walls are on the cool/cold side in the Winter.

    I will add to this thread later.
  8. twiddler

    twiddler New Member

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    When I tested my pellet stove, my flue was hot, too hot to hold my hand on it. I hope it won't be a problem, I have it 3" from my sheet rock wall.
  9. MCPO

    MCPO Minister of Fire

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    Might be beneficial to aim a small quiet 50-60 cfm muffin fan on that exhaust pipe and wall. Lots of heat being wasted there.
  10. packerfan

    packerfan Feeling the Heat

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    Running that stove on a 5 setting is pretty hot. I don't think I ran my stove over a 3 setting all last year on my englander which has the same control panel, and is made by the same company.
  11. coreystaf

    coreystaf New Member

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    Manufacturers test each new model before they begin selling them, and when they give you required clearances, it is because they KNOW its safe. One thing that we learn during certification courses is that when stoves are being tested, safe wall temperature is somewhere around 70 degrees above ambient temperature. As mentioned above, the average persons hand can touch 130 degrees for a few seconds before being too hot, that is a pretty good way to tell how hot the wall is. If your room temp is 70 degrees, 140 would probably be pretty safe still.
  12. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Again, an obvious point, but stove clearances are not specified to keep the wall "cool" or combustible cool - they are engineered to keep the wall from igniting. Actual combustion temps are up around 500 degrees, although there are some guesses that continuous temps of 300 or so degrees (over years) can dry out wood and make it very easy to ignite. The specs are therefore set at close to 1/2 of that - which is a VERY WIDE margin of safety.
  13. Malak

    Malak New Member

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    North Central CT
    Wood WILL dry out and burn at a lower temp over the years.

    My company used a wood box for a 400 degree oven and it
    lasted decades but suddenly decided to start charring.

    Just put a 24GA metal shield on 1" spacers on the wall. And
    1" off the floor to allow "up" flow.
  14. coreystaf

    coreystaf New Member

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    IF your stove is installed according to Manufacturers Specifications, and you are burning properly, any additional steps taken would only be extra work. We can trust the manufacturer and UL to know exactly what the stoves will do, even with people who misfire and treat the stove in the worst possible way. TRUST
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