1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

I'm looking for a stove that is ok to burn eco/bio bricks and has reversable or rear flue outlet

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by jankdc, Jan 24, 2013.

  1. jankdc

    jankdc New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    Messages:
    19
    Hi, I'm in the market for our first wood stove. We are going to put it in front of a fireplace with the stove pipe going up the chimney so we need a reversible (which seem to be mostly cast iron) or rear flue outlet. I like the idea of the ecobricks and biobricks and want to be able to use them. So what are the companies that allow bricks that also have a reversible or rear flue outlet?

    Thanks!

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,178
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    I don't think I have found a stove manual yet that endorses burning compressed fuel. A lot of this is common sense and following the brick mfg recommendation for burning. If this is the fuel of choice look for a stove with a flat, rectangular or square fire bed so that you can pack the bricks tightly. As for the stove, how large an area are you hoping to heat, how open is the floor plan and where are you located?
  3. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    5,711
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    Welcome, jankdc! :)
    Do you have a budget for stove and chimney. A stainless liner to the top of the masonry chimney can cost as much as a stove...
  4. JonOfSunderland

    JonOfSunderland Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    Messages:
    118
    Loc:
    Western Mass
    I know Hearthstone specifically does NOT recommend compressed bricks, but my stove doesn't owe anyone anything. So I tried them, and with good results. I can load my Mansfield with 19 Eco-bricks (varies by brand since brands vary by size), within 15min shut the air completely down, and the stove will park right at 600°F with sustained secondaries for hours and hours and hours. I specifically remember loading it one Saturday at about 11am, and then reloading on coals at 8am the next morning!

    Eco Energy Fuel Blocks on the other hand are awful. They ash over and kind of form a protective layer over themselves preventing them from burning readily. Can only burn three of them max. They must be spaced apart to let air flow between them, and the primary air MUST be left almost completely open so as to "wash" the burned layers off of them exposing unburned wood. They're more suited for ambiance than providing heat.

    Haven't tried Bio-Bricks yet, but my station wagon is currently loaded up with 10 packs waiting to try this weekend.

    Of course, this is all moot since the Mansfield doesn't have a rear outlet option, nor do I recommend going against a stove manufacturers recommendations if you're buying a new stove and value the warranty. But, despite my stoves manufacturers recommendations, compressed bricks work for me, and I used them cautiously starting off to make sure I wouldn't over fire my stove.

    This summer I'll have more time to work on a real wood supply...
  5. ddahlgren

    ddahlgren Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2011
    Messages:
    463
    Loc:
    SE CT
    Are these the ones that burn well?
    http://www.tractorsupply.com/redstone-trade-ecobrick-pack-of-6-1001261
  6. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2008
    Messages:
    1,854
    Loc:
    Amanda, OH
    They are fine in the Elm and the clean air version has a cast iron outlet that can swivel for straight back or straight up. I have absolutely no problem stacking them in the bottom as there is plenty of room.
  7. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2008
    Messages:
    1,854
    Loc:
    Amanda, OH
    Also I have tried 3 different brands and they all burn fine.
  8. Bub381

    Bub381 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2011
    Messages:
    865
    Loc:
    Mid-coast Maine
    Remember they swell when burning so do not pack them tight,i guess can split a stove.
  9. JonOfSunderland

    JonOfSunderland Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    Messages:
    118
    Loc:
    Western Mass
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,178
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    The cheaper blocks swell and burn up quicker. The highly compressed blocks and logs don't swell and burn longer.
    Bub381 likes this.
  11. jankdc

    jankdc New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    Messages:
    19
    Thanks for all of your reply's.I get that, as with very dry or soft wood, the bricks have more of a tendency to over-fire, and I need to be smart when using them. My background: I almost bought a Hearthstone this week, and found that using the bricks voids the warranty. Since I haven't bought a stove yet, and I know that I'll be using the bricks some. What manufacturers allow the burning of the bricks? If I'm going to spend thousands on a new stove, I might as well get one that I won't immediately void the warranty. wkpoor: you mention the Elm and I found this on their site: An Elm is also not designed to burn wood pellets, corn, compressed grass or any other manufactured solid fuels." I assume that the bricks are a no no. I put an email in to them to see if it voids the warranty. I live in Northeast Ohio, and have a 1450 sq ft two story home. Ideally I want to be able to heat with wood, but we don't need to. I want a stove rather than insert, so that we can cook on it. Thanks again.
  12. mfglickman

    mfglickman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2012
    Messages:
    676
    Loc:
    NW CT
  13. mfglickman

    mfglickman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2012
    Messages:
    676
    Loc:
    NW CT
    Did you state your budget yet?

    I have a used Fireview, from Craigslist. The liner in the chimney cost more than the stove. I've never heard NOT to burn bricks in it...so I do, sometimes.
  14. jankdc

    jankdc New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    Messages:
    19
    I got this from Vermont Iron Stove, who make the Elm:

    "Hi,​
    I have a good friend, and customer, who mixes them in with dry hardwood. As a result he gets very hot fires. I would just advise you to make sure the stove is in tip top condition, and that you are very careful not to let the stove burn hot without proper supervision.​
    Steve"​

    So this is a stove that might work.
  15. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2008
    Messages:
    1,854
    Loc:
    Amanda, OH
    I am that friend. I have regular conversation with Steve. I am in my second season using the bricks. Its really all about common sense. If you stack them tightly or use them say 2-4 at a time they work fantastic. I think any mfg will error on the side of caution because there couild always be that person that may not understand what the bricks are capable of. As long as you use good habits and know your stove the bricks will not be a problem at all.
  16. ridemgis

    ridemgis Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2012
    Messages:
    222
    Loc:
    South Kingstown, Rhode Island
    As others have already said, these will burn without incident in any stove as long as the operator is careful about loading and air control. I find that a half dozen bio bricks on a bed of hot coals get me to nearly instantaneous secondary burn and primary air fully closed in just a few minutes. These blocks require a little experimentation but I've found that they burn predictably and controllably with great heat output.

    On the other hand, if I wanted to loosely fill the stove with this 6% moisture content product and let 'er rip, I expect I'd have a warranty voiding massive over fire on my hands.
  17. jankdc

    jankdc New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    Messages:
    19
    Got this from Lopi:

    There is the potential for a lot of variation in materials with eco-bricks. We have neither tested nor approved the use of these in our appliances. As a manufacturer we recommend you speak with your local dealer about the quality and successes/failures in your local market regarding pressed biobricks.

    Should any type of unit failure be attributed to the use of bricks we haven’t lab tested, then yes, the warranty would be voided.

    Please don’t hesitate to email with any other questions you have.

    this is from the local dealer for Lopi:

    Lopi says you can burn a 50/50 mix of the bio-blocks and cord-wood. Bio-blocks tend to burn hotter (because of a low moisture content), so you have to be careful to not over-fire the stove.

  18. ridemgis

    ridemgis Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2012
    Messages:
    222
    Loc:
    South Kingstown, Rhode Island
    Sure Lopi,and of course there's little variation in cordwood.
    UMainah and ddddddden like this.
  19. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,178
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    I have found that the variation is no so much with the type of wood used in the blocks, it's more a question of the compression used to form them. There's a world of difference in the way a low compression product burns vs a high compression product. And of course, the biggest variable is the person feeding the fuel and running the stove. Properly used, a fire with highly compressed bricks or logs will burn quite predictably with little risk of stove damage. The key word is properly used, which often they are not. Also, there is some confusion because the most available product is often DuraFlame logs which have paraffin in them and are not appropriated for woodstoves.
  20. Treacherous

    Treacherous Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 13, 2010
    Messages:
    960
    Loc:
    WA state
  21. jankdc

    jankdc New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    Messages:
    19
    Treacherous, thanks for that link. That's a good read. I saw that Fyrebug said that Century / Drolet / Enerzone / Osburn / PSG / Valcourt puts this in their manuals:

    "Do not burn manufactured logs made of wax impregnated sawdust or logs with any chemical
    additives. Manufactured logs made of 100% compressed sawdust can be burned, but use caution
    in the number of these logs burned at one time. Start with one manufactured log and see how the
    insert reacts. Never use more than two manufactured logs."​

    Unfortunately, I don't think that any of their stoves have a rear flue outlet.

    I like what Blaze King is doing also, but it seems that their stoves are all top venting.
  22. jankdc

    jankdc New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    Messages:
    19
    I got this from Hearthstone:

    We feel that they burn too hot and fast to be a good source of fuel to
    burn all by themselves. Mixing them in with regular fuel is okay if you
    already have some. Natural cord wood is best if you have not bought any
    bricks yet.

    Jim Casavant
    HearthStone


    I put this as a reply and let you know what happens:

    Thank you for your reply. So just using them will not void the warranty?
    However over-firing the stove with them (or with really dry firewood or
    pine or any other fuel) would void the warranty?
  23. hockeypuck

    hockeypuck Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Messages:
    256
    Loc:
    south central NH
    Look at the Regency products including the Hampton line. I have burned bio bricks (of many types.. now wax... just wood) for three years now. Good for shoulder season and mixing with green wood if needed.
  24. jankdc

    jankdc New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    Messages:
    19
    Thanks!. That is perfect hockeypuck. I had looked at the Regency website, but didn't see the Hampton line. I'll try some of the local dealers this week.
  25. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,927
    Loc:
    southern ontario
    You could call and talk with Woodstock. Their FIreview is rear venting (you don't mention size of your home), while the Progress Hybrid, (which is a larger stove) is rear or top venting. I called Woodstock in November to ask about burning compressed bricks, because I was going to have someone stay at my home while I was away, who had a back issue, and I though the bricks would be easier. They were not very encouraging or supportive of using the bricks, as they felt one got better results with natural hardwood. However, they did not tell me NOT to burn them, nor did they say that doing so would void the warranty on the stove. Of course, I have no idea what the warranty is, beyond the six month full refund policy (no questions asked, for any reason including the appplication didn't work for you, etc). I don't really worry about it, because the stove is well built, and Woodstock stands behind it. If I have a problem, they are going to help me fix the stove.

    That said, they do recommend in their manuals burning only natural hardwoods.

Share This Page