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Initial Kill-a-Watt Fridge Data

Post in 'The Green Room' started by Mo Heat, Feb 24, 2007.

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  1. Mo Heat

    Mo Heat Mod Emeritus

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    Garage Fridge:

    11.24 KWHs / 94.4 hrs = 83.61 KWHs/mo * 0.055/kwh = $4.60/mo

    Basement Fridge:

    32.54 KWHs / 381.00 hrs = 61.49 KWHs/mo * 0.055/kwh = $3.38/mo

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  2. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    Interesting data. Kind of surprised to see the garage and basement are so close. Up until this past week, my garage has been like a refrigerator...no power required! :) Any plans to check them this summer? I suspect the garage usage may change when the weather warms up, but the basement may stay fairly constant?

    Have you checked any appliances in the 'off' position? I'm becoming more curious about how much power is 'evaporating' around here.

    Corey
  3. Mo Heat

    Mo Heat Mod Emeritus

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    The garage fridge is probably 10 yrs older than the basement fridge. My garage was about 50oF at the time. I'll likely check them again in the summer. In fact, I'll be checking something with the kill-a-watt meter until I figure out where all the watts are going.

    As far as the off position, I was kind of freaked out when I checked on the garage fridge last night. It wasn't running, but it looked like the kill-a-watt meter was registering wattage. I didn't know what to think of that. Still don't. Maybe it's evaporating electrical watts (EEW!)! :)
  4. jjbaer

    jjbaer New Member

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    OK Mo...that's about 140 KW-hrs for thos two items...where are the other 1160 KW-hrs going...LOL....?
  5. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    Maybe the defrost cycle or a crank case heater on the compressor? (or maybe that light really does stay on when you close the door!) Let us know what other watt gulping appliances you measure.
  6. Mo Heat

    Mo Heat Mod Emeritus

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    This effort isn't going to be as easy as decommissioning one old refrigerator. It's starting to feel like searching for the legendary pot of gold at the end of a rainbow. I've never had much luck with that, either.

    I'm going to leave the k-a-w meter on the garage fridge for a while longer to get a better feel for things. I'm really surprised it doesn't use more electric than thus far indicated. I'm headed to Florida for the next couple weeks, so I'll see what it says when I get back.

    On another issue: the radon fan is up and running and the radon level has already dropped upstairs in my bathroom from 9.2 to 8.2 pc/l in just over 48 hrs of up-time. Uhm... and I now know it's costing me $3 per month. ;)
  7. kevinmoelk

    kevinmoelk New Member

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    Fridges are very inefficient in general. The basic design of having the compressor and all the other "stuff" creating heat underneath the box that it's trying to cool seems counter-productive imo. Notice commercial fridges have all the heat generating components on top of the fridge. There is a manufacturer... Sunfrost?... that has developed homeowner fridges with the compressor on top, but they are the only manufacturer that comes to mind.

    I've often wondered about simply gluing ridgid foam on the exterior of the fridge to see if that would help to lower the outgoing kw. But... seeing as I eliminated my garage fridge I won't do it on the fridge inside my home for asthetic reasons. Anyone want to be the guinea?

    Phantom loads (parasitic draw) is a real pain. Seems the remote control age, and every electronic gizmo having a clock doesn't help when trying to save energy.

    -Kevin
  8. colsmith

    colsmith New Member

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    I just completed a similar study, 2 freezers in the basement and the kitchen frig

    the number is a 1 hour average of KwH

    upright freezer 0.0492
    chest freezer 0.0400
    refrigerator 0.0345


    These were not the biggest energy hogs, at the top of the list we have

    palm tree 0.1481
    computer 0.0973
    computer monitor 0.0706

    The palm tree is just 2 strings of light on a palm tree looking stand. They look like chrismas lights, but they are a big power suck.

    [Edited for spelling - Hubby (Jim) posted this, he is dyslexic. Also, the highest number/time was from the microwave, although of course we don't run it very long at one time. Doubt it could be energy efficient to dry firewood in it! - Marcia]
  9. jjbaer

    jjbaer New Member

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    Wench,

    Years ago all refrigerators had those ugly compressors on the top of the fridge and they sat up top like a hat-box on a shelf.....then for aesthetics and to lower the center of gravity, they put them down below.....so now you have to pay big bucks to get the ones where the compressor sits up top.....
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