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Insulation

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by EWILT, Jan 3, 2008.

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  1. EWILT

    EWILT New Member

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    Need some help...I have a 1500ft walkout basement in Wyoming (cold). I have a pellet stove down there. It keeps it around 70. The basement has insulation/vapor barrier everywhere but where the concrete is...and the floor. I need to finish it but don't have the money to insulate/stud/sheetrock. What is the cheapest way to hold some heat down there until this summer when I have the $ to finish it. Whatever I do I don't want to have to take it down once I begin to stud it. Thanks

    Eric

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  2. EWILT

    EWILT New Member

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    UPDATE...I put 4x8 sheets of 1 inch foam on all the concrete walls! What a difference that made, before I could only get it to 70/71 with running the stove on the highest setting. After installing the foam it's HOT. I can get it as hot as 80-85 if wanted, with less pellet usage. I can't wait to do the floor and finish the rest. QUESTION...does it hurt to stud over the foam sheets then R13 rolls then sheetrock. I guess I'm thinking even less heat loss. Entire project cost less than 450 with a new chaulking gun and batteries/charger.
  3. EWILT

    EWILT New Member

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    Thanks...I'm worried about the exposed foam also. I will start this week on studding the wall. Thanks for the help.
    PS. you'd think they'd make foam fire retardant in some way

    Eric
  4. EWILT

    EWILT New Member

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    Start studding and sheetrock ASAP....thanks

    Eric
  5. jmlarson

    jmlarson New Member

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    5/8" inch sheetrock would not absorb any fire for upto 1 hour. Sheetrock does have a fire rating.
  6. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Don't know if it would "hurt" anything to do studs and rock, though you do need to cover the foam with something (I beleive code calls for at least 1/4" wood panelling or 1/2" sheet rock) for fire safety. However you might want to consider the notion of "diminishing returns" - a little insulation can make a big difference, but since that lowered your heat loss, adding more insulation will have less of an effect, such that after a certain point you won't get enough heat savings to justify the cost / effort.... Not sure just where the "critical point" is, but it is something to keep in mind, especially if you have a limited budget.

    Gooserider
  7. EWILT

    EWILT New Member

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    Thanks for the input. My thinking was that there's already R13 where there is no concrete. The foam I installed is R5, add the 13 and I've got 18 on cold concrete walls. I'm not a builder just a ordinary home owner. I think just as important as the walls is the floor which seems to be on the cold side currently. Any ideas on flooring would be much appreciated. Thanks

    Eric
  8. jmlarson

    jmlarson New Member

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    they carry those at Lowe's. only problem is there are 2'x2' squares and they cost 5 dollars and some odd cents a piece. a bit pricing for a subfloor.
  9. kenora

    kenora Member

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    Hi Ewilt; sounds like you get the same kind of bone numbing cold we get up here on the prairies in Canada (usually -30 to -40 for 6 weeks or so in Jan - Feb). It would be typical here to bond foam to the wall and then frame a 2x4 wall in front of it with R14 Roxul or R12 Fiberglass in the voids, there is no thermal bridge created by the wood (it has far less R value than the insulation) because of the foam behind it, it'll make a warm wall. I would recommend the Roxul for sure, it has better R characteristics and is way easier to work with and is even fire retardant. As far as vapor barrier is concerned just use tuck tape (that red stuff that you use with Tyvek) to seal the edges of the foam together and you should be good, warm and safe.

    We had a bon-fire at the lake in December it was -34...

    the cottage is in Kenora I live on the frosty(er) prairies in Winnipeg

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  10. EWILT

    EWILT New Member

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    Looks quite pleasant there...thanks for the input. I think I will do as you stated with the additional insulation. It stays cold here also, not quite your cold though.

    Eric
  11. crazy_dan

    crazy_dan New Member

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    the cold and lack of good wood is the only 2 things I miss about Montana. The only wood to be had was pine and cottonwood sure doesn't even come close to the oak I burn in Missouri
    I would tape the foam joints frame and add insulatin then I would go with sheetrock call it done and enjoy
  12. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    I know this is way late, but I've been insulating my basement walls and was doing a search.
    I've read of putting 1" foam on the basement floor and putting some tongue and groove plywood or osb on top and using tap cons to fasten it to the concrete floor.
    The floor insulation is intriguing, but would be suited to floor coverings such as laminate or carpet, while I'm thinking something more sturdy like tile. I don't think you could put tile over a 5/8 plywood layer over the foam. Maybe with Ditra? Anyway, the bottom of the metal door to the outside would have to be trimmed somehow, maybe the bottom step of the stairway would become a trip hazard, and the areas in a potential utility room might not be insulated. Still thinking on this...
  13. steam man

    steam man Minister of Fire

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    I have a walk out basement . The walls are insulated on the outside with 2" foam 8' down and all exposed areas on the open side. I suggest you consider applying the 2" foam on the outside to exposed areas. Get below the soil line the best you can. Getting to below the frost line would be ideal. There are caulking glues that will adhere to the concrete and foam. I believe there are also premade lip seals you can put over the top edge available. There is a product that can be put on like stucco to cover the foam though I can't recall the trade name at the moment. You can wait a season or two before coating. I heat my basement currently with a woodstove and the walls/floor stays remarkably warm. One thing about theoutside foam is that it won't interfere with your future remodeling plans.

    I would suggest you also look around the sill area for air leakage and to make sure it is insulated.

    Mike
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