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Is anyone piling it really high?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Rory, May 18, 2012.

  1. bluedogz

    bluedogz Minister of Fire

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    I feel so small...

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  2. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    We stack 6ft tall 8ft long with pallets and it is stable so far. We do usually have to restack after the first 6 months or so due to settling of the wood from drying out. Then we can forget it for a till we burn.

    Pete
  3. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    So Pete. I see you can post here. How about the hearth room. Any luck yet?

    I thought about riding the bike to your place today but its not in the cards yet. Danged pain can ruin a good day.
  4. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    Not so far but everything else works. Hopefully the back pain gets better for ya ! I was out almost all day removing a flower bed and fixing dead grass spots in the yard. It was really hot out I think I drank 4 gallons of tea lol.
  5. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    I'm gonna redo my stacks this year, one of them is about ready to fall over anyhow. Gonna spend some time making a decent base with crushed rock and then I'll be able to stack 6-7ft high. (whatever I can reach without getting a ladder)
  6. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    Wow...all Ash?

    LLigetfa, are you just storing the woven-wire fencing there or has it got a wood use? It occurred to me a couple of days ago that I could make a handy little chunk storage bin from a couple of pallets, some woven wire (might use the bigger square instead of 1X3") and a few T-posts. I thought I would have the "door" split in the middle of one side (two T-posts in the center, one for each side of the door) and put slower-drying Oak chunks on one side, quicker-drying woods on the other, and be able to pull back a section of fence for access to one side or the other depending on which was drier...
  7. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy Minister of Fire

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  8. firebroad

    firebroad Minister of Fire

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    That bit about the stack leaning sunward--interesting. My 6 ft. stack was also leaning, but I thought it was because of the west wind or something. I just spent a few hours tapping them in from top down with the back of the splitting maul. Hard to do when you get further down. I also atributed to my inexperience, as the my later stacks seem to be much sturdier. Also, I kept the later one at 5 feet. Not sure I will stack higher from now on without some serious bracing.
  9. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Outside . . . I go up 4 feet or so . . . seems to be more stable and I have plenty of room . . . plus I don't need a step ladder to build and take the stack apart.

    Inside the woodshed . . . to the rafters . . . but I do have to use a small step stool.
  10. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    My stacks stay very stable even up to 9 ft or more. 100_1052sm.jpg
    chuckie5fingers and Realstone like this.
  11. infinitymike

    infinitymike Minister of Fire

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    I'm new at this but I built racks like Ralph.Each one holds almost a cord.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    I also stacked 4'x18' x7' with no rack,they seem to be leaning a little and worry me.
    [​IMG]
  12. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    LOL, some of us are known to pile it higher than others. Go to the ash can for some good examples. ;)
    Pallet Pete and chuckie5fingers like this.
  13. chuckie5fingers

    chuckie5fingers Member

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    Nice:p
  14. Rory

    Rory Member

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    Sorry for the delay, I kind of forgot I had started this thread until this evening. My "stove" is a Tarm Solo 30, a very efficient gasifier. The 6 cords heats my 2500 sq ft house in Sidney (close to 4,000 if you include the basement, which stays comfortable), and all of our domestic hot water. Really, I think the only "higher stack" solution involves another tier and some equipment I don't own to hoist pallets or whatever. More likely I'll just build another woodshed sometime.
  15. ohlongarm

    ohlongarm Minister of Fire

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    My split stacks go 6 feet,6'6 at most. My rounds unsplit 7 feet,I've had single rows of split fall over once,but never rounds unsplit. No kids here to worry about so I go high.
  16. chuckie5fingers

    chuckie5fingers Member

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    nice heaphausen Jags
  17. clr8ter

    clr8ter Member

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    infinitymike, those racks in the 1st photo are cool! Looks like a very efficient use of materials. What is the blue stuff on top? I'll have to admit, if I built those racks, and they were covered well enough, I'd try to get away with KD lumber for anything not touching the ground....
  18. flyingcow

    flyingcow Minister of Fire

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    pallets of wood..jpg
    Realstone likes this.
  19. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Just for my trademark's purpose, let keep it accurate. Heapenhausen.:p
    chuckie5fingers likes this.
  20. chuckie5fingers

    chuckie5fingers Member

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    Thanks for the correction;)
  21. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    I go about 5' high, three rows deep on pallets. I try to keep the stacks in shape by knocking the splits back into the stack from time to time. I started this stack in the spring of '10 and it is still standing fine.
    DSC07076.jpg
  22. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    16' stacks, end to end for 112', 5' high, single rows. Any higher and they want to fall before they're completely dry.:mad:
    I'll be restacking about 32' due to less wood use the last couple years.
  23. KaptJaq

    KaptJaq Minister of Fire

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    Most of the stacks in this picture are 8 ft long. The center ones are 6.5 to 7 ft high, the outer ones are about 5 ft high. With the kids in the yard I did not want the first stack they can touch to be too high. There is a 6 inch gap between the stacks but every so often I offset a couple of splits to inter-lock the stacks together. This helps the stacks support each other and leaves space for airflow. The stacks seem very stable, the other day I found my twin 9 year old boys on top trying to retrieve a ball. When they saw me they jumped down and immediately received a stern lecture to remind them to "stay off the stacks". As the wood dries the stacks get shorter. The wood to the left has been c/s/s about a year and has lost 6 to 8 inches in height. The wood to the right was c/s/s this month.

    IMG_5735_b.JPG

    KaptJaq
  24. Ironwood

    Ironwood New Member

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    5 ft seems to be tops for me in single rows With the new wood shed I may go to 6 ft with dry wood as it will have more support.
  25. woodsmaster

    woodsmaster Minister of Fire

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    I've found frost in the ground to be the main reason for my tall stacks to fall over. My avatar pic stayed up great untill the ground froze and shifted. If you have a good footer to stack on you should be able to go pretty high with only shrinkage to worry about.

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