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Let the theory begin..... wood seasoning

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by iceman, Feb 28, 2009.

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  1. iceman

    iceman Minister of Fire

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    the pic is wood split today but cut in nov 08
    the other is wood cut in nov 08 but split in nov 08 already showing some cracks
    point is wood does still "season" in the winter this wood was buried under snow until a week ago
    i know its not ready to burn but there is a huge diff in color from what was split today and a couple of months ago

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  2. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Neither colour nor cracks are any conclusive means to measure how dry wood is or is not. They do however provide some indication of same. If wood is dried slowly and then bucked, there will be no visible cracks and the colour will not be the same as wood that was bucked and split green and left out to dry.

    Wood tends to crack at the ends when it dries faster than the centre. Wood exposed to sun/rain/air will develop a grey colour.
  3. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    What he said ^
  4. basswidow

    basswidow Minister of Fire

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    split it one more time and see if its wet inside.
  5. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm not sure what the question or mystery is, ice. Makes perfect sense to me that splits from 3 months ago would appear differently from splits from their sister rounds today. Of course they've been seasoning...even under the snow. It's very dry under there so long as the temps stay low. As LL and basswidow said, regardless of the appearance, you don't really know the moisture content until you do a fresh split and measure it. I'd stick my neck way out there and wager the 3-month splits measure lower MC than the today splits. Rounds will show graying and cracks in the end grain way before the wood deep inside is seasoned. It's all the exposed barkless surface area of a split that encourages moisture loss. Good lookin' wood, in any case! It'll serve you well when its time comes, I'm sure. Rick
  6. iceman

    iceman Minister of Fire

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    ahh guys i probably didn't make anything clear .. i am not saying its seasoned but saying that wood does "season" still in the winter.. may threads ago there was a debate about wood not seasoning in the winter or when does it season faster winter or summer ..
    this is just proof it will dry out in the winter ... even buried in snow ... many people think opposite.. because it is buried in snow it will still be soaking wet as when i first cut it .. however , i think if it was just exposed to air it would season just as fast as wood in the summer or say wood in warmer climate... the bone dry air here def sucks the moisture outta wood
  7. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Got it. Agreed. Rick
  8. jadm

    jadm New Member

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    My wood probably seasoned more this winter than it did last summer. We have had terrific winds and very dry weather all winter. The kind of winter that blows all the moisture right out of anything and we have had very little snow to keep things wet. Never even had to drop the tarps on my stacks.

    Very different weather than many of you have had this winter. I have a lot of wood left over and it will be super dry by next fall. I still have 1/4 cord oak left that I didn't use because our temps. just never got cold enough to burn it....

    I agree that wood seasons in the winter.
  9. chad3

    chad3 Feeling the Heat

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    Covered wood in the winter does better than uncovered. Just started to grab a few of the pieces off of my uncovered pile and some are hissing like a mad snake. Made a mistake not covering some, but taking bits to use at the same time just to burn some of it this year. Still burning fine, but some water. I'm going to add wood that has the bark removed is drying much faster and better than the wood that still has the bark, even with both split.
    My 02 oh and Rick, nice maul got mine for Xmas, haven't used it yet.
    Chad
  10. iceman

    iceman Minister of Fire

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    i completely agree wood dries faster without bark prolly cause there is more surface area to evaporate
    on another note thosr pieces of wood with color has made a significant change over night the temp dropped into the 20s or low 30s and you can see a big diff between yesterday and today...
    but i was thinking summer and winter need each other to season.. winter sucks moisture out and summer with wind and heat bakes out the remaining moisture:) however, we have only been cold since ahhh say dec. jan was real cold.. feb wasn't bad at all
    so as far as say summer when from about may to oct temp are + 60 (june -august 75+) i think summer has the advantage BUT winter does almost as much or just as much but in a shorter period of time...
  11. lexybird

    lexybird Minister of Fire

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    bark holds alot of moisture . I have discovered wet ,but well seasoned wood can burn just as crappy as dry unseasoned green wood
    a soaking wet glove left on the deck rail outside will dry a h#@@ of a lot faster in july warmth than frigid january ,wind will only do so much
    heat is what really makes the difference
  12. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    The wettest wood will ever be is healthy standing. As soon as it's knocked over it begins to dry, even if it's frozen.
  13. gyrfalcon

    gyrfalcon Minister of Fire

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    Makes no sense. Even rain doesn't penetrate far enough to make a difference if the wood can sit inside for a couple of days before burning, never mind snow. My experience is exactly the opposite of yours. The stack I left out and didn't cover over the winter is noticeably lighter and drier than the stack I covered the top of. But I don't bring wood in directly from the outside and throw it in the stove. I let it sit in nice-looking stacks in the stove room for a couple of days before burning it.
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