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Log load delivery

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by PapaDave, May 28, 2009.

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  1. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Finally got my delivery on the 6th of May. 20 cords.
    Jim showed up in the driveway, setting up the sleepers, then the first load being dropped! WOOHOO. Wait a minute,........... now I have to start cutting and splitting all this.
    Dave

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  2. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    How much does a load like that run?
  3. northwinds

    northwinds Minister of Fire

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    I guess this is the other side of the spectrum from my VW Golf diesel and small trailer. :)
  4. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Last load off the pup. Oh yeah, ignore the orange fence.
    Working on the front half, and last load from the front.
    All done, waiting for me to do something.

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  5. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    This guy is reasonable. This load was $1500 for 20 cord. All oak. :coolsmile: I'm a happy camper. It won't last when I start cutting into it. But I'll be happy again when it's being burned, and nice and dry! My brother insists on doing things the neanderthal way. Cut and split in the fall, then burn that winter. :bug: His wife and son complain how hard it is to get a fire going, but he's hardheaded. Guess I'm the boyscout, 'cause I would rather be prepared. I had to deal with that the first winter I burned. NEVER AGAIN, if I can help it. I think I'm on my way to fulfilling that goal.
    Last load in Sept. of 2007 was 1300. I got 10 from that one, and my brother took the other half. That one had some maple and ash mixed in.
  6. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    that is the biggest grapple I have seen, Time for work!
  7. btj1031

    btj1031 New Member

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    Wow, impressive. Wish I had me a load like that!
  8. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    Nice. How long you figure that will last you?
  9. Slow1

    Slow1 Minister of Fire

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    Sweet! and I thought I had some work waiting on me... I'll think of you now anytime I look at my piddly pile and think I have far to go.

    I think that would last me 4 or 5 years (burning time - I have no idea how long to cut and split). I too am curious how many years that is expected to last you.
  10. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Geeze PapaDave. Maybe I'd better come on up there and give you a hand. Why, I can stand around all day just clapping! lol

    Just give a holler if you need some help.
  11. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    Awesome pile of sticks! That is sure to be hours of fun!
  12. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    We use about 4.5 cords/yr., so I'm hoping for a little over 4 years. This winters wood has been done since last fall, so we have over 5 yrs. worth on hand not including my scrounging and leftovers from last winter. That's just stuff off the property, like pine, poplar, and maple.
    Got a couple decent sized pension checks this spring, and this delivery was part of the plan.
    I can now go at least a couple years w/o needing to buy. Maybe i'll have time to do more scrounging too.

    Dave
  13. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Was awesome watching this guy work! Picked a load off the truck, laid it down, then picked up and dropped individual logs as sleepers.
    My granddaughters got a little too close, and he picked up on it right away. BEHIND him. Very nicely asked to have them move back.
    Before delivery, he reminded me that this would be a "green money" deal. HAHA. Took me a sec to figure that one out. Not sure if it's all green anymore, but I got the point.

    Dave
  14. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Hey Dennis,
    HOLLA!
    J/K, but I will not get all this done this year. Hope to have at least 1/2 done though. Still modifying the stacking rotation plan. Slow and steady. Have about a cord done so far, so only, um...............19 more to go. Notice how I did that math right quick there?

    I do appreciate the offer, but I like the solitude while cutting and splitting. Granddaughters have helped SOME with the splitting and stacking. They REALLY love the tractor rides more than the work though. :
    Dave
  15. JustWood

    JustWood Minister of Fire

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    MAN I love the looks of those B-Trains!
  16. joshlaugh

    joshlaugh New Member

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    That is an awesome pile of logs!
  17. flyingcow

    flyingcow Minister of Fire

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    I like the set up. Nice truck. But it's not what we refer as a B-train up here(here we go, regional stuff). It's what I call a pup trailer. A big azzed pup, being pulled by a really big azzed self loader. A B-train(up here close to canada) is a 3 axle tractor pulling a 3 axle trailer hooked into another 2 axle trailer. But really....why be so picky :)

    But I took delivery of 12 cord of wood on, what we refer to as a self loader. Which is(up here) a straight truck, 24ft body, with a total of 4 axles.
  18. Wallyworld

    Wallyworld Member

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    [quote author="flyingcow" date="1243578233]
    But I took delivery of 12 cord of wood on, what we refer to as a self loader. Which is(up here) a straight truck, 24ft body, with a total of 4 axles.[/quote]

    tri axle pulp truck
  19. d.n.f.

    d.n.f. New Member

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    Funny to see the way the wood is loaded on that truck. Out here they would laugh at that. The logs should run the whole length of the load not crossways the locals would say.
    We pay 1400 to 1800 but for softwood (fir, larch, pine). $1500 for oak, now that is sweet.

    Debating about getting a load this year. The run up and down the logging road is getting tiresome, and tiresome on my truck.
  20. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Crossway loading is less safe for other drivers as the load can easily leave the trailer striking other vehicles. Crossway loading is safer for the truck driver as the load will easily leave the trailer resulting in less payload pushing, should the truck get in an accident.
  21. flyingcow

    flyingcow Minister of Fire

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    The way it works up here, and i assume in other parts of the logging community, is it's loaded as to what the mill wants.

    ----Cross ways is fine long as it is loaded and bound down properly. I've seen very little problems this way. The old days there was hardly any straps put on a load. Now there is Fed and state guidelines on strapping/chaining/binding a load. Pretty decent fines if not done right. Use to have a lot of 4ft pulp loads. Do have to pay a little more attention if the logs have some snow/ice build up on them.

    ----Long length/tree length is ok. Either way the truck has to have a headboard. Not a typical aluminum one like you see behind fladbed trucks. Should be approved for heavy duty. There are aluminum ones used, but if it were me, put on a good heavy steel one. Double gripe it to the frame. Seen these work very well.
  22. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Dave, I know exactly what you are talking about as I also love the solitude. Sadly, my granddaughters live a long ways from us so we do not see them very often.

    Have fun!
  23. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    I well remember the first time I saw logs loaded that way and I also thought it strange. However, that still is the best way to load. These logs usually go for pulp and not saw logs so they are all cut to 8' and it really does work nicely to stack them on the trucks that way. And I've never seen an accident doing it this way.

    It is also great watching a good trucker load and unload the logs. It is done amazingly fast and he makes it look like child's play.
  24. d.n.f.

    d.n.f. New Member

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    Well if you want a load out here you need 70' of space plus fudge factor cause that is how long the logs are.
  25. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Most of the loads I see around here (and there are A LOT) are done this way. He had chains front to back at least, but I didn't pay attention to any other means of securing the load.

    Dave
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