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Log splitter off of loader hydraulics?

Post in 'The Gear' started by jklingel, Nov 10, 2007.

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  1. jklingel

    jklingel Feeling the Heat

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    I assume this is not a new concept. Anyone use a loader (tractor, whatever) to pump the oil in a log splitter? I'd sure like to use the ponies/hoses/etc that I have, as I have quick-connectors that I don't use. Any links to where I could find out about this? I'll start checking w/ the Bobcats; it seems they have a huge variety of implements for loaders. Thanks. j

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  2. jklingel

    jklingel Feeling the Heat

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    Don't need any links; google buried me, but I'd still like to hear from anyone who has used one. FI, has anyone used the 3-pt attachment one at Northern Tool? How about these auger splitters that I have now just seen; quite an interesting concept, if your wood is pretty tough.
  3. 'bert

    'bert Minister of Fire

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    If you are asking about just using the hydraulics off a tractor, it is done all the time. Built my splitter this way - works great. If you have more specific questions I can try to help you out.
  4. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    Pretty easy - just get the flow rate and max pressure off your tractor pump, then size a cylinder according to the ultimate force and speed you want to develop. A good tractor pump should have plenty of pressure and GPM for a splitter

    When you talk about auger splitters, are you talking about something like "The Stickler"

    http://www.thestickler.com/

    The subject has come up on here a couple of times. I think the general consensus was something like "May work OK for easy to split wood, but seems like pure suicide if you happen to get your shirt or pants caught in the log or it gets stuck and starts swinging around instead of splitting normally"
  5. jklingel

    jklingel Feeling the Heat

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    Cozy: That is the concept. Good pt about The Big Screw. It gives new meaning to "getting wrapped up in your work".
    North: Yes, I have/will have questions, thank you for the offer to help. For now "got pics?" I'll look up the hydraulics stats on my loader, but I suspect it has plenty to run a splitter ram; it already runs two descent rams. I'd sure like a 44" travel.
  6. Nofossil

    Nofossil Moderator Emeritus

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    I did the numbers for the hydraulics on my tractor and decided not to. I'll use a much higher volume PTO pump so I don't have to run at redline to get pitiful cycle times at best. Wood splitters run the cylinder in and out quicker than I realized compared to a loader bucket, for instance.

    You really have to do the math, but if you have less than 11gpm at an engine speed you'd be comfortable with, you're not going to be happy if you have a big pile of wood to split.
  7. jklingel

    jklingel Feeling the Heat

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    My loader pushes 14.6 gpm at 3100 psi and 26.4 hp. The loader itself has 53 hp. The splitter at Northern Tool requires 11 gpm and 2500 psi, but no cycle time is listed. I have never dealt w/ hydraulics before, so where do I get equations? What am I calculating?
  8. Nofossil

    Nofossil Moderator Emeritus

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    Good numbers. the calculation is this: calculate the area of the piston in your hydraulic cylinder (3.14 x 1/2d squared where d is the piston diameter) - about 19 square inches for a 5" cylinder, for instance. Multiply that by the stroke - a 24" stroke would give you about 470 cubic inches of fluid that you'd need to fully extend the piston. Convert to gallons (0.004329 gallons per cubic inch) - about 2 gallons of fluid in this example. A cycle is twice as long - out and back in, or 4 gallons. At 14 gpm, it will take about 17 seconds per cycle - not bad, but not super fast.

    You can multiply the piston area by the hydraulic pressure to get the splitting force - 29 tons at 3100psi.

    A 4" or 4 1/2" cylinder will be faster but with less force.

    Couple of comments - 3100 psi is high - make sure your components can handle it. Your GPM rating is at some specific engine speed, probably pretty fast. You have WAY more horsepower than you need, so you'd probably be happier running at a more comfortable speed. Of course, this will increase your cycle time.

    I'm looking at a 20 or 25 gpm PTO pump to allow me to get decent cycle times at lower speeds - I'll run it slower and get something like 15 gpm.
  9. Rick

    Rick Member

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    I use my tractor to run a 3pt splitter. I love it. It's a bit slow, but I don't mind. I bought it from Tractor Supply. My tractor has rear remotes, but you can definitely use your loader hydraulics with long enough hoses. Heres a pic from a couple of weeks ago, as you can see, I split a good amount of wood annually.

    Attached Files:

  10. jklingel

    jklingel Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks for the info. Now I know what I have to calc, and I can play w/ that. My neighbor has a bunch of hydraulic rams from dump trucks, etc, and I will try to get something long. The cycle speed is not a huge concern. IMO, if you need a fast cycle speed, you are one of those individuals who has a day job, kids at home, etc. I feel for ya, but I'll take a 20 second cycle time any day. While one log is splitting, I can be lifting another into place, or taking a nap. This info is very helpful indeed. If anyone has any close up pics that would be great, too. I envision the ram sliding along an I-beam with some strips of heavy plastic (P-tex or something) that is used on the bottoms of mushing sleds, and/or whatever they are gluing to the bottom of riverboats now. Slick stuff, and real tough. Thanks "loads". j
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