Log splitter pics ?..?..?

Roospike Posted By Roospike, Aug 23, 2006 at 5:11 AM

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  1. Harley

    Harley
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    Apr 11, 2006
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    must have done something wrong... this was the first pic.
     

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  2. suematteva

    suematteva
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    May 25, 2006
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    Harley,

    Who makes that thing? can you post a link..rough $$ for it? thank you.
     
  3. ourhouse

    ourhouse
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    Feb 16, 2006
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    Thoes Super Split splitters work pretty good. No room for error with that. Very very fast cycle time. A fried of mine uses one for his fire wood business.
     
  4. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg
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    I believe they are called switzers works on a fly wheel and gear principle amazing power
     
  5. Roospike

    Roospike
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    Nov 19, 2005
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    what is the ton-age of that little splitter? I've not seen one before.
     
  6. ourhouse

    ourhouse
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    Feb 16, 2006
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    I think they're made in Bridgewater MA.
     
  7. ourhouse

    ourhouse
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  8. Roospike

    Roospike
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    Nov 19, 2005
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    Hey , that splitter is kinda cool , and quick. Odd there not more popular being faster with the same force as they claim.
     
  9. Harley

    Harley
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    Apr 11, 2006
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    I've had it a few years now, and Elk, I think they may be built right in your area... I bought this one used and rebuilt from the guy who was just buillding them part time to keep the business going... from what he told me. it was his father's business, and just kind of took it over with the patents.

    Looking at the manual.... depending on the model, the splitting force is between 10 to 25 tons.

    and yes... you really do have to pay attention while you are using it, because it does go fast. I don't know if they still have a website, but in a few, I'll check... If I find the link, I'll PM anyone with the link..... I don't want to give anyone free advertising
     
  10. Harley

    Harley
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    Apr 11, 2006
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    ooops... guess I was a little slow there
     
  11. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg
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    Some of the best technology used amazing splitters but like many have found big box stores are hare to compete against
     
  12. carpniels

    carpniels
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    Dec 6, 2005
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    Hi Guys,

    The technology looks quite fascinating. Would love to see one in action.

    The problem I have is the price. They are about twice as expensive as regualr splitters that you can get everywhere at Hd or Lowes. That seems too much.

    Would love to buy one, but not for the limited use it gets in my area.

    CarpNiels
     
  13. Harley

    Harley
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    Apr 11, 2006
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    I agree, Carp - the price is up there - I was just lucky enough to find a used one. Between the time savings, and the overall simplicity of the unit (they seem to be pretty bullet proof, and not a heck of a lot can really go wrong with them), I think it works out for me in the long run.

    Whenever I bring it somewhere to help someone split, when they first see it, they usually snicker and say, "yeah right - that little thing is going to split all this???" Doesn't take long - it is an impressive little machine.
     
  14. kwburn

    kwburn
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    Nov 19, 2005
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    that thing is crazy fast! never seen anything like it.
     
  15. ourhouse

    ourhouse
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    Feb 16, 2006
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    If you make one wrong move you could lose a digit or two. Thay do work great though.
     
  16. Corey

    Corey
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    Nov 19, 2005
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    Those supersplitters seem awesome...too bad they are so expensive. They have a short video on the web site under the 'principal' link:

    http://www2.primushost.com/~logsplit/

    I had a link to a guy that made one from scratch. Big trouble for him was finding a spur gear and rack of the correct size and adequate strength. I'll try and dig up the link tomorrow.

    While we are throwing up pics...here is my homemade splitter. 4x24 ram, 6.5HP, 11GPM pump, 19 ton capacity @ redline, 17 ton operating. It hauls around like a two-wheeled cart.

    Corey
     

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  17. kd460

    kd460
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    Feb 5, 2006
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    Hey Cozy, that is slick. Nice set up, very compact and clean. Any problems with it being a little top heavy? I really like that. How about a brief parts list??? What size pipe is that?

    How about a few more pics? I really want to copy your setup. Thanks, KD
     
  18. Corey

    Corey
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    kd460

    So far it has performed pretty well. As far as top heavy...it is nothing you would want to put in a pickup and drive around with it unsupported...it would probably flop over in a few seconds. But for wheeling around to a tight spot in the woods and splitting on level ground, no troubles. You could always make the axle wider for more stability, but it works for me.

    The pipe is 6" dia schedule 40 steel - doubles as a ~3 gallon oil reservoir...just some stuff I had laying around. With good welds and gussets at the ends, it is more than enough to handle the load.

    If I had to do it over again, some things I would change:

    - Use 6" square tube. You'd have a little more oil capacity, it would be easier to work with and you could also install a wedge guide rail for splitting gnarly pieces of wood. With no support, it tends to walk a little if you don't keep an eye on it.

    - Use a horizontal shaft motor and mount it lower to help lower the COG. I used a vertical shaft because I found one cheap.

    Other than that...big power in a small space!

    Corey
     
  19. kdiman

    kdiman
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    Jul 3, 2007
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    Hey i am a new member from Nebraska. I thought i would post a pic of the log splitter that i just bought. It was orignally built by my dad around 20 years ago. It has a Wisconsin VH4D engine and the cylinder came off of some sort of a ford loader i think he said. It will split a log up to 34" long. I am in the process of trying to get it to running again it has been sitting for about 10 years. I got it all freed up but i am not getting fire. I am debating about taking the Wisconsin engine and single stage pump off of it and putting a Honda 6.5 hp and a two stage pump on it. Any advice would be appreciated.

    Kelly
     

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  20. keyman512us

    keyman512us
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    Feb 27, 2007
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    KDIman...
    First off, welcome to the forum.
    Interesting homemade splitter. That Wisconsin VH4D motor does seem like a "little bit of overkill" to drive a hyraulic pump...but whatever works...go for it.

    No spark???

    Perhaps "the coil is shot". Have you tested to see if the coil is making a spark?

    The Wisconsin VH4D is a "fairly tempermental motor" IMHO... good but getting old (and harder to find parts for BTW). This past spring I had to buy a coil for one... a "bit pricey" Lists for like $45.00

    How is the carb on it?? (another potential source of frustration)lol.

    Again, welcome to the forum... keep us posted on your progress.

    Ohh...If you do end up "swapping the motor" and "want to sell that old Wisconsin"...by all means...please let me know (from 'one gentleman to another') ;)
     
  21. kdiman

    kdiman
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    Jul 3, 2007
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    I ordered parts for the magneto today. they should be here at the end of the week. Some water got into it. I think that is why o don't have any spark. I will let you know what5 i find out once them parts get here.
    Kelly
     
  22. Gooserider

    Gooserider
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    Nov 20, 2006
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    Seeing as how I have a whole collection of log splitters, I thought I should post a pic as well...

    Top row, from left...

    Hatchet - handy on elm and other wood that has tough fibers keeping the chunks together.

    12 lb Monster Maul - short handle is annoying, but this is my primary splitter works on most logs

    8 lb sledge / maul - works to split some logs by itself, but mostly used to drive in the wedges at the bottom.

    3 lb hand maul - useful if working a stubborn bit where I've driven a wedge below flush with the surface and can't get a clean hit on it any longer with the 8lb maul.

    Bottom row, from left...

    Estwing "Super split wedge" - My favorite wedge, but only by a slight margin. The "wings" near the top increase the splitting pressure on the log faster if you get the wedge in that far before the log splits. They also open the split wider, so it is easier to drive the wedge below flush with the log.

    Three additional "generic" wedges, in approximate order of how I use them if the first wedge doesn't work

    Gooserider
     

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  23. ccwhite

    ccwhite
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    Oct 14, 2008
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    Howdy Yall. I'm new here been looking for a while and finally decided to join and post some pics. I needed a log splitter and considered buying but couldn't talk myself into spending that much money on something so simple. After seeing a friends homemade splitter I thought hey I can do that!! So I did. I'm sure there are a lot of bigger badder splitters out there, but this one is mine and not from Tractor Supply. As far as what it is .... Sears 16hp Riding mower lopped in half, 16gpm 2 stage 3000psi pump from Tractor Supply, 4" cylinder w/24" stroke from local farm machinery auction(came with a prince splitter valve with return detent but no handle so the handle is the original tractor gear shift modified to work), 8" heavy I beam from Scrap pile at local steel mill (Used to be holding up a big water tank), House trailer axle shortened to 5' with a 5" C-channel backbone and extra gussets for strength (probably overkill), Propane tank for hydraulic reservoir (holds 5 gallon), Splitting wedge is the cutting edge of a dozer blade about 11" tall backed with a piece of C-channel and some flat plate to really open 'em up quick, used 1 1/2" angle to make the guides for the push block (also serves as a log cradle)originally were 1/8" stock but broke loose once with a really knotted chunk of locust so now beefed up to 1/4" (no more trouble). Anyway I love it and I'm proud of it. Besides ... its the only log splitter I've ever seen with headlights. :cheese:

    I have more photos and better quality had to scrunch em down to put em on here. Lemme know what yall think. Everyone I know thinks I'm a nut. LOL

    Happy Splitting,
    Charlie
     

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  24. knucklehead

    knucklehead
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    Jan 14, 2008
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    ccwhite - welcome and thanks for posting pics. That's a good idea - new and old fashioned, too. Many of the older tractor manufacturers supplied stationary engines wrapped in the sheet metal of their regular mobile tractors. Some of us have probably seen stationary water pumps and/or large generators thast look like someone sawed a bulldozer in half. The engine is covered, you also have all the controls in one place, and it's electric start, I'd imagine. Good job,man.
     
  25. Jags

    Jags
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    I like it! Nice and clean. Very functional. Great job!

    Does the jack stand ever get whacked by a split?? Its kinda hard to tell from the pics if it is tucked away or not.
     
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