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looking for ideas

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by rich m jr, Feb 26, 2013.

  1. rich m jr

    rich m jr New Member

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    remodeling living room. house was built in early 80s. fireplace needs replaced fire box is small and cracked etc. should i just demo the fireplace and put in a stove in the corner? any other ideas?

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    That's what I did. It was dusty work, but no regrets.
  3. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

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    I had a builder's box fireplace in the corner of the great room. Pulled FP and enclosure wall out. Put tile and stove in. Sold builder's box for $150. Does yours look like this?

    prefabFP1.jpg
  4. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    If you want to go for serious wood heating, I would.
    Take your time to decide what you want to achieve, and what your priorities are, and cost constraints, then get the ebst deal you can during the off season for a good set up. There are many considerations: climate, home size, insulation, fenestration, (heat loss in general), wind exposure, internal/external chimney. fulltime primary heat, full time supplementary heat, wekkend or occasional burning , appearance of stove, , quality and ease of use, etc. If you do decide to put in a stove, post details of your situation and you'll get good recommendations/assistance here from stove to pie an dhearth requirements.

    Good luck, and enjoy the process.
    Jon1270 likes this.
  5. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    If it were me......I'd rebuild the fireplace, increase it's size if possible, then add a stove/insert......I'd keep the fireplace just for resale value.....some buyers are not into wood heat, but love to have a fire going in the fireplace from time to time for atmosphere
    gyrfalcon likes this.
  6. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    Definitely think about what you want out of this. Do you hope to heat with wood, or just have a functioning fireplace that looks nice? How big is the house? How much time and effort are you willing to give to this? Burning wood for heat makes the most sense if you enjoy all the work that goes with it. It's perfectly fine if that's not your thing, but its a question that will have a big effect on what you should do here.
    gyrfalcon likes this.
  7. rich m jr

    rich m jr New Member

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  8. rich m jr

    rich m jr New Member

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  9. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

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    You're moving along well. I'd pull FP and chimney and make an alcove stove install with Class A chimney. Materials won't be too expensive and if you can do the labor yourself - sweet. I bet in Kennewick, WA, you'd like lotsa wood heat.
  10. rich m jr

    rich m jr New Member

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    went looking at stoves looking at a pacific energy spectrum classic 2380 plus tax and about 1000.00 for the exhaust system.
    www.pacificenergy.net
  11. rich m jr

    rich m jr New Member

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    anyone know where to get codes for installing an alcove if i tile the walls how close can it be??/??
  12. Cynnergy

    Cynnergy Feeling the Heat

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  13. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

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    The codes will be in the manual for the stove you buy. Biggest one is CTC (Clearance To Combustibles). Combustibles include wood framing and sheetrock. You have: hearth R-value, stove CTC, black (connector) pipe CTC, Class A chimney CTC (normally always 2"). Download the manual for the stove (eg: Spectrum here: http://www.pacificenergy.net/pacificenergy/pdfs/SUPER-SD1-250112-20.pdf ). Read CTC requirements.
  14. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Tiling the walls alone won't make a difference. However you can reduce the side distance down from 16" to 12" if the tiled wall is floating 1" off the alcove wall on spacers and open top and bottom so as to make a proper wall shield. http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/stove_wall_clear
  15. rich m jr

    rich m jr New Member

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    thats what i needed to know thanks
  16. rich m jr

    rich m jr New Member

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    any ideas on a heat sheild height up th walls what to use where to get the spacers how many to use etc
  17. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Install the stove using double-wall connector pipe. Bring the shield 6" above the height of the stove flue collar.

    You can use any non-combustible material for shims. They sell ceramic shims for this purpose. But a simpler way is to cut 3" x 3' long strips of the 1/2' Durock and double them up to create your 1" shims. Attach the double shims to each stud, then attach the Durock cement board on top of the shims leaving a 1" air gap at the top and bottom so that there is good ventilation behind the wall shield. Tile with a latex modified thinset on the Durock base.
    milleo likes this.
  18. rich m jr

    rich m jr New Member

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    i was told at the store where i'm looking to purchase my stove that you can't use the cement board to gain closer spacing in wa state anymore. called the inspecter whating on a return call any idea where to get the info?
  19. rich m jr

    rich m jr New Member

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    well looks like going with a zero clearance fireplace due to wa. state laws and alcove size anyone know which are better etc?
  20. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    That's a good plan if you want maximum heat.
  21. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    You'll likely get quicker response if you start a new post with a heading along the line: Need a zero clearance fireplace, which are the best options?:)
  22. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    Have you checked clearance to combustibles on stoves? There are some with 12 inch side clearance.

    Recently checked Hearthstones for someone. I know that the Mansfield, 10 hour burns, 14 hours usable heat, will heat 2500 sq feet, requires ember protection only hearth has 18 inch side clearances, 8 inch rear clearances, 14 inch corner clearances, requires a 50 inch deep pad.

    Heritage, heats 1900 square feet, 8 hour burn, 12 hour usable heat, requires 16 inch clearance to combstibel on the L, 15 on right, 7 inch rear and 11 inch corner , ember protection only pad, and pad only needs to be 37 1/2 inch deep. Maybe one of these stoves would work for you?
  23. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Ask them to provide you with documentation of this. I thought it depends on the stove. If the stove mfg. lists tested, reduced clearances in their documentation based on NFPA wall shielding, then that is the defining document. Last I knew WA state honored NFPA 211 heat shields. That is not just cement board, but a ventilated, non-combustible wall shield instead.
  24. rich m jr

    rich m jr New Member

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    where can you get the NFPA 211
  25. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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