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moving wood

Post in 'The Gear' started by cheapheat, Oct 5, 2007.

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  1. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    :lol: Tell her that if she wants pretty, she can move the wood in the pretty container... If she wants YOU to move the wood, let you pick the tools to do it with - maybe you should find some really efficient but ugly / expensive solution, and tell her how much you REALLY like it - then offer to compromise on the Vogelzang item....

    Gooserider

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  2. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Hey, it's a lose-lose for me.

    Thing is, I don't think the Vogelzang is bad looking, except for the larger wheels, which, while I feel practical, emphasizes its hand truck lineage, lol.

    Seriously, the Vogelzang comes in that antique finish, which matches our tools' finish, plus it has an additional strap with a cross brace.

    Here is the little wheel, weak model from Northlineexpress:

    http://www.northlineexpress.com/images/products/5UW-1151SM-xlg.jpg
  3. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    I agree the VZ unit does look a bit more substantial and arguably better than the Northline model - though I'd be a bit worried about the design on either - both look like they are based on bending flat steel strips, which means that unless the strips are really heavy, or are made from some sort of spring steel alloy, they aren't going to offer that much resistance to bending back under load. The VZ unit would potentially be better if only because it has more metal. The VZ would also handle short splits a bit better.

    I was just suggesting the really ugly solution - starting with the HF cart or getting worse in that direction, as a means of encouraging her to compromise on the VZ as something that would let you move wood more easily while still looking sort of OK in a living room.

    Another idea is that IMHO the only part of the VZ cart that doesn't really fit the decorative motif is the wheels - while I'd want more industrially rugged wheels and don't worry about the looks, it might be possible to find wheels that could be used as replacements that would be more decorative, while still being functional - perhaps a large spoked wagon wheel type design like used on old farm equipment?

    I guess I'm lucky in that regard - the GF is mostly willing to accept whatever I deem is needed in the way of heating technology as long as it isn't TOO ugly... I currently use an HF wood cart for my splits and an assortment of 5 gallon buckets and trash cans for my chunk wood.

    Gooserider
  4. tkirk22

    tkirk22 New Member

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    Hmmmmm

    That VZ cart is somewhat stylist. I have a harbor freight cart that has sat outside for years. It works great but it's quite ugly....especially now. The big wheels really do help it roll up steps.

    I may have to make something that's good looking but with bigger wheels. That way I can haul a load in and park it near the stove. Anyone have any ideas for 20" wheels that look antique?
  5. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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  6. tkirk22

    tkirk22 New Member

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    Yes....That's the first thing I thought about but I'm not a wood craftsman and there's little hope of an Amish family moving in next to me.

    I'm hoping to figure out a good way to use modern wheels that are disguised in some way shape or form. It's has to pass my test for being strong and pass the relatives test for being nice looking. The wife won't let me have a wood stacking monkey so she don't count. ;-)
  7. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    Our wood is stockpiled at least 35 to 40 paces from the back door. We've been using a wheelbarrow like forever to bring it indoors through the woodshed. It's gotten a lot easier since I don't overload it anymore.
  8. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

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    I was using the heavy duty recycling bucket on the trash can, as stated earlier in this thread.
    Last week, I found this on the curb. The wheels were locked up with rust. I really didn't want to
    put this in the new car, and if the wheels were'nt locked, i would have walked back and wheeled it home.
    it was less than a mile away, my friends grandmothers neighbor. So, laid out blankets, bit the bullet,
    and gently llifted it into the back of the brand new car. Couple shots of liquid wrench, let that dry,
    a couple squirts of tef-lube spray, and she rolls!

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  9. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Definitely a good score... thats the sort of cart I would like to have for a lot of my out door stuff moving, though most of the carts like that which I've seen are a bit large for actually bringing the wood inside. The HF cart is limited on the sorts of things you can put on it, but is great for getting splits all the way from the wood pile to stoveside.... I actually have built up a fair collection of that class objects at this point, mostly all trash-picked.

    1. The HF wood cart - purchased
    2. A small conventional wheelbarrow - trashpicked, in rough shape, may end up back on the curb soon.
    3. Green plastic garden cart - Replaced the wheels on it, now it works well if not overloaded, and ground is fairly flat. Wood doesn't fit in it all that well due to the odd shape of the inside, but it's fine for dirt and other such things. Trashpick
    4. 2'x4' garden wagon - purchased from TSC, good for larger objects and slightly rougher terrain, can be pulled behind lawn tractor. Good for moving large amounts of wood per load, and other such objects.

    Gooserider
  10. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

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    It says on thecart side that it the original Garden Way.
  11. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

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    Hi guys,

    I upgraded recently to a similar cart that Eric has. I had the yellow Lowes cart, but the wheels are too small and it gets stuck to easily in the woods on roots, ruts, etc. The 20" wheels are great. Pulling is easy. and the splits stack nicely in between the wheels.

    It has worked great, but it needs some modifications. First, the axle would slide in the clamps. Tightening the bolts did not help, as the bolt would be pulled through the 2x4s. I had to add some large carriage washers to have more grip on the 2x4. That helped a lot.

    The only other modification I want to make is to have some kind of catch, so that the splits that are slightly small, don't fall forward on my calfs when I pull the cart. I don't know what to do there yet. Probably some canvas strung between the handles.

    Also, the splits are drying in the woods. During heating season, I bring 4 loads a week to the house and dump them in the screened in porch. From there, I bring them inside in a canvas log carrier (closed, so it does not spill any wood pieces). Works well and the missus is happy.

    Thanks

    Carpniels
  12. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I'm glad to hear that it's working out, Niels. Maybe because my wood tends to be longer, I've never had a problem with chunks falling through the space and onto my legs, but I can see what you're saying. Maybe a long bungee cord going front-to-back to wrap the load to keep everything snug?
  13. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    I have a cart for my mower/GT that's rated for 900#. I buck into rounds or split in place (for easy stuff like red oak) then haul to the spliter or pile
  14. Stevebass4

    Stevebass4 Minister of Fire

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    [​IMG]

    bring in about two days worth at a time
  15. Scrounger

    Scrounger Member

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    I use one of the kids sleds when going the ten feet from the wood shed into the basement. No steps to negotiate. Load up the sled and just pull it into the basement through the slider door. No effort at all with snow on the ground.
  16. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Why not just use one of the kids - I've been told that is even less effort! :lol:

    Gooserider
  17. Carl

    Carl New Member

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    I have always used a wheelbarrow to move wood to the house with. Worked well for many years. This spring I purchased a large garden cart at Home Depot for 149 bucks. It is very nice and I think this was last years price as they only had one left. The same cart was priced at 189 everyelse. Been using it around the yard and very happy with it.

    Here is the link to the one I purchased and like. Couldn't get the picture to copy so if you want to see it then:

    Rubbermaid lawn cart
  18. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Watch it, Eric, we don't want any wood length debates going on here. :) Rick
  19. chad3

    chad3 Feeling the Heat

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    My wood is about 700 feet from the house (parents house is across the street and a 575 driveway). Use a wheelbarrow to get it to the door and then use the HF log carrier to get it up the one stair and into the sunroom. That was one of the best deals going!!!
  20. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    700ft...Wow! that's a long par 3.
  21. chad3

    chad3 Feeling the Heat

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    Yeah, tell me about it, but I only own a 100x 75 foot postage stamp. Its a good deal though as we have now put about 15 cords up for the next three years without destroying my entire yard. He has almost 10 acres so it is alright.
    I end up keeping about a 1/2 cord at the house for the worst weather.
    Chad
  22. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    I wonder what the most efficient, easy to use, large volume hand firewood hauler would be for that long run?
    I've been moving all my wood so far (except for into the house) with a wheelbarrow.
    It's pretty maneuverable but gets a little tedious for moving a bunch.
  23. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    My guess would be one of the 4 wheel heavy duty wagons, as long as the ground is reasonably smooth and level. With a two wheeler or wheel barrow, you have to at best balance, and probably at least partially support the weight of the load. This limits how much weight you can get at a time, plus the size of the carrier will also be a limit.

    With a 4 wheeler, all the weight of the load is carried by the cart, so the person moving the wood can put all his effort into moving the load instead of just holding it up. This puts the limiting factors more towards a question of how much wood can you fit onto the wagon.... Choosing a big wagon, and / or putting substantial sides on it would allow one to put a pretty big load on. Even with minimal sides, I can move more wood with my wagon than I can with my 2 wheeled HF wood cart, just because I can fit more on... Obviously the limit goes down if you have to drag the load up a hill or deal wih other obstacles, but it still allows more effort to go to moving the load instead of holding it up.

    If having to deal with stairs or other obstacles, or if limited to two wheels, I'd go with an HF log cart style - seems able to fit more wood in a load than any wheelbarrow I've tried, and low effort to move it. The amount of wood it will carry is pretty much the most I can get up a flight of stairs, so it's a good fit to the limiting factor.

    However it's worth noting that the HF cart claims about a 200lb weight limit IIRC, while my four wheel wagon claims 1200lbs - lots more room on the wagon.

    Gooserider
  24. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Actually, a two-wheeled cart with large-diameter wheels like Niels is talking about bears the entire weight of the load on the cart's two wheels when it's moving. And two wheels is half as much friction, which means less energy expended. The best thing about a two-wheeler is that you can pull--rather than push--the load, unlike a wheelbarrow.

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  25. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    It's not half the friction. You may reduce the coefficient of friction (wheel to ground), but you have increased the weight so the total friction is not cut in half.

    You can pull a wheelbarrow. Not as conveneint, but I've done it- think "rickshaw" :)
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