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moving wood

Post in 'The Gear' started by cheapheat, Oct 5, 2007.

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  1. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Math was never my strong suit. Probably that's why I cut wood.

    How about less friction? I would think that two wheels contacting the ground would produce less than four.

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  2. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    Mebbe- each wheel sees twice the force, however, so they may dig into softer ground and cause even more issues. Good arguementy for pneumatic fat tires. (oohhh- Fat Tire... good stuff)
  3. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    I see more issues with getting the wheels to go over small bumps... once you get a wheelbarrow moving- don't stop!
  4. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    In the logging business, we look at ground pressure. More tires and fatter tires produce less ground pressure than fewer, skinnier tires. And yes, I'll go with the Fat Tire every time, especially on a Friday afternoon when it's pushing 90 outside.
  5. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    That's why I like our wheelbarrow...it's low tech, wheel goes easily through snow, mud great in the woods runs over small limbs too. Lay a plank down and it easily goes though our woodshed doorway.

    I take the trash out with it...use it all the time.

    30 years ago before we had logging trails and a Kubota. We'd cut in the field and wheelbarrow rounds out 20- 30 yards to a trailer. That one big tire was a true labor saver.
  6. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    I agree that MOST of the weight when using a two wheeled cart of the HF log carrier style is carried by the wheels, however the user still has to exert a certain amount of effort into keeping the load balanced on those two wheels - arguably this is effort and attention that is no longer available for strictly pulling. Depending on terrain, load, etc. I will either push or pull a two wheeler depending on the situation, but mostly have to be facing it, which means walking backwards if pulling it. This also somewhat reduces the amount of work I can put into pulling.

    With a 4-wheeler, all the weight is on the wheels, and it stays there, so ALL my effort can be spent on pulling (note that with my cart at least, backing is not a good option, it can be done but doesn't work well) - Unless I need to watch clearances on the load or some such, I can face forward and go, which is best for sustained pulling - however I can pick whatever approach I want, including hooking it up to the lawn tractor :coolgrin: It's stronger than I am...

    Thus my choice is the two wheeler for rough terrain, stairs, etc. but for pure load capacity I go for the four wheeler. I can also get loads with the four wheeler that I'd have trouble getting with the two wheeler, and vice versa...

    Gooserider
  7. TruePatriot

    TruePatriot New Member

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    Something to consider?

    I like Carl's Rubbermaid Cart (see link, p.3) though I have never used one, because it will contain all the bark, dirt, melting snow, etc... that inevitably falls off of wood and, in an open cart, would fall on the floor of your home. So, too, obviously, would a wheel barrow, which I use in my cottage--I wheel it up a snowy board, one step up, and right inside, next to the stove--the dog approves of the style, apparently, and my g.f. avoids the place, so no complaints.

    For our main house, however, (complete with three-step porch) I need something a little more stable and wooden-floor-friendly than my metal-legged wheelbarrow.

    I like Eric's open-style cart (or Goose's HF cart) because you can pull the wood off of the cart, as you work your way down, as opposed to bending and "picking" the wood from inside the Rubber Maid Cart's tub.

    So I would ask Carl: do you find that it's a pain to pick the wood out of the bottom of the cart, or am I just incredibly lazy? The bottom of that tub looks lower than my wheel barrow's bottom, and the open carts seem easier to unpack than a 'barrow or a tub. Since I don't like to clean, either, your Rubbermaid Cart appeals to me, as I say, because at least it's containing all of the wood's associated "effluvia," to be dumped outside, upon the reload.

    Just thought it was worth mentioning the "lifting vs. cleaning" trade off.

    Maybe a hybrid, two-wheeled cart like the Rubbermaid, but with open sides and just a "bellypan," (to catch the detritus) is the ideal solution?

    On a More Serious Note:
    Re: the mention of the use of a "bungee cord," to secure wood on the cart: I use bungee cords frequently, on the rack on my bicycle, back of my pickup, etc... but I try to be very careful with them (knock on wood three times). A couple of years back, there was a news story about a surgeon who had to give up his career because, while bungee-ing a Christmas tree onto the roof of his car, one end came free, or something, and the bungee permanently damaged one of his eyes--if I'm not mistaken, he was actually blinded in one eye--ugh.... A sad, even tragic story.

    So I get nervous thinking about bungee cords being used with gloved hands/at night/in icy conditions/after-a-few-beers/while-cold-and-in-a-hurry, etc.... I mention this just to remind everyone to be careful, and safe, with bungee cords (knock on wood three times). Personally, I don't think I would use them in the wood cart application, but that's just me. I certainly do not hold myself up as a profile in courage, or as an example to others--just trying to sound a note of caution.

    No negative criticism intended to any parties.

    Happy burning, happy thoughts.

    Peter
  8. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    I understand that- I'm saying that it's a bigger consideration than the friction if your axels have seen grease in the past few years- 2 wheels or 4. Wheels digging into the ground, bumps, going over sticks- far more frustration and effort IMO- especially when it makes you lose balance and dump a load.

    heh heh- I said "dump a load"...
  9. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    I have a smaller version of the rubbermaid style cart (not sure what brand mine is)- I don't find it works particularly well for wood (or much else - but it was a freebie, so...) The biggest problem is the inside of the cart is very irregularly shaped. with cutout moldings for the wheels, a multi-angled sloped bottom, etc. This makes it a challenge to load efficiently. It isn't a big deal with liquids or solids with a small "particle size" like dirt or sand, but wood or other big things like concrete blocks give problems with the shape. In addition I've found that the centrally positioned wheels, while they make it easier to carry heavy loads also make the cart tend to want to tip over forwards if you aren't careful when loading, or if you pick the handles up to high while moving it. Because of this tipping tendency, and the fairly small wheels, I find that the cart is VERY sensitive to ground irregularities - the legs tend to catch on things, potholes will tend to make you dump the load, etc. Stairs are basically out of the question with it, and I wouldn't even want to try a steep ramp. OTOH, I don't find it's that much more of a pain to get wood out of the bottom of it than it is to get wood off the bottom of my HF cart - both put the bottom of the load almost on the ground so you have to bend over much further than you do with a regular wheel barrow - but neither is a big deal. (unless you're incredibly lazy... :lol: )

    I don't worry about it that much, but it looks to me like if you had some appropriately stiff cloth (canvas or cordura nylon), and maybe some stiffenning rods, it would be possible to make a "diaper" for the HF cart that would be able to catch most, if not all, the wood droppings.

    I agree bungies are dangerous if not used properly - I've been popped by one a couple of times, and have had friends injured by them... biggest things I would suggest are
    1. Wear good glasses,
    2. Don't stand in the direct line of the cord when hooking or unhooking.
    3. Use two hands - pull and hold the tension with one hand on the cord itself while hooking with the other.

    Gooserider
  10. TruePatriot

    TruePatriot New Member

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    Gooserider,

    I hear ya on the "diaper" for the H.F. cart--and your four wheel wagon (from Lowes--was that you?) has appealed to me, for the reasons you site, (stability, pulling with garden tractor, etc...). And I would think a "diaper" or a sheetmetal pan of some sort, over/in place of the mesh bottom panel, would be a welcome addition to the four wheel cart, in terms of catching most of the detrius, melted snow, etc.... So far, I'm moving wood with a wheel barrow, but am considering some of the options under discussion in this thread.

    Re: the following, these are words to live by--well said:

    Peter
  11. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Here's an 'in-situ' picture.
    Yes, it does have a hand truck look, but those big wheels are functional.
    That's my argument, anyway, and I'm going to (try to) stick to it.

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  12. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    I would say that it doesn't look bad at all... It's not exactly decorative, but it fits in pretty well and looks like it's busy doing what it's intended for. With the wheels on the wall side, they don't really show if one isn't looking for them. It's sort of like a small scratch or ding in a peice of furniture - nobody else notices it, but it screams at you because you know it's there...

    If I were playing interior decorator, I'd actually be more interested in trying to clean up / hide those electrical cords than I would be about the wheels on the cart...

    Gooserider
    (Who has plenty of electric spaghetti of his own...)
  13. Carl

    Carl New Member

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  14. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Yeah Goose, you're right abot the cords.
    I have to look into hiding them.
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