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MTD splitter review w/ pics and suggestions for prospective buyers.

Post in 'The Gear' started by FuzzyOne, Nov 30, 2006.

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  1. FuzzyOne

    FuzzyOne Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
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    Loc:
    Central NJ
    I'm new here and would like to contribute to this great site. I have a MTD log splitter that was purchased from HD back in 2000 when they still made them with full I beams. It's rated at 25 tons with a 6hp B/S IC engine. I usually split about 4 cords a year.

    I've read several posts from those members seeking information on cycle times, pump ratings, engine HP recommendations, and splitting capacity. IMHO, more is better but not always necessary for the average homeowner who isn't in the business of selling wood. I'd suggest looking at what type of wood you will be working with, specifically type and size. Do you really need a splitter that is capable of splitting a 36" oak round if you ony have a 16" chain saw and will not be working with wood that size?

    I recently changed all the fluids in my splitter since I just obtained a load of wood and decided to take the camera with me today to take a couple shots. I want to illustrate a few points.

    First is wedge design. MTD use to use a welded wedge that had a wide taper. They have since gone to a solid cast iron material with a similar design. I[ve used a friends Iron and Oak that had a two step taper and found that I had to push the wedge further into the round before it would split. This is where cycle time may come into play. The less the wedge needs to be driven into the round before it splits will save time. A thinner wedge will require deeper penetration. Very rarely will you need to push the wedge through it's full stroke of travel. Don't get caught up on the difference between 13 seconds and 17 seconds.

    Here is an example of large round being split. The round is about 34". Notice how shallow the wedge needed to go in before it cracked. I think this is ash, but I never was good at wood classification.

    Attached Files:

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  2. FuzzyOne

    FuzzyOne Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
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    Central NJ
    Now here is a pic of the wedge level with the top of the round. This was enough to seperate the two pieces.

    Attached Files:

  3. FuzzyOne

    FuzzyOne Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
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    The size of this round brings up another suggestion. Horizontal vs. vertical splitting. I would estimate this round weighed in at about 180 lbs. I don't know how some guys could possibly lift this onto a horizontal splitter without a hydraulic lift. I'd suggest getting a splitter that easily converts to a vertical position. All you will need is to get an edge of the round on. I have honestly not split more than a few rounds in the horizontal position. Maybe because I'm lazy or just weak. LOL

    Now about HP. This splitter has a B/S Quantum engine rated at 6hp. When I split this round, I did not notice the engine bog at all. The wedge stopped for 1-2 seconds and then just powered in. A friend has the 12 hp B/S on his and it plugs right along. He also uses more gas in the process. I've never seen a need for a larger engine. Most homeowner splitters come equipped with a 5 -8hp engine. I would pay pay extra for brand over hp rating.

    Splitting force. As I stated earlier, this splitter is rated at 25 tons. Is more better? I guess, but there hasn't been a round I couldn't split. I've seen that stated in several threads and I agree. I laugh when I see a splitter in this category rated at 37 tons for example. It's overkill. 20 tons plus is satisfactory.

    Well, thats all I can add to the subject. I've been very happy with my MTD. I keep it under a tarp and apply a thick coat of oil to the entire splitter every year to guard against rust. The engine fires right up and I just recently switched to synthetic oil. Guessing I had at least 100 hrs on the unit, I also changed the hydraulic fluid. The only part I ever needed to purchase was a hydro filter and they are easily obtained through any lawn and garden supplier.

    Good luck to those looking to purchase a splitter.
  4. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Eastern Nebraska
    Awesome write up and WELCOME to the pack, great pic's too.
  5. Turner-n-Burner

    Turner-n-Burner New Member

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    North of Boston
    how do you find the upright position is on your back? You must be bending over all the time right? to move the round, spin it for resplits, then to collect the splits?
  6. CK-1

    CK-1 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
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    Welcome.. very good pics and info..
  7. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    That makes sense. A hand maul is shaped like that.
  8. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
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    29,069
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    Northern Virginia
    I have never split a log horizontally with my 1988 Duerr/MTD splitter. All are split vertically. No back problem at all sitting on the little stump in front of the splitter. In fact the happiest part of the day is when you split the "seat". You know you are done.

    When I bring the rounds out of the woods I push them off the trailer side by side in a line up an uphill rise in the yard. The splitter is down at the end of the line. As I reach over and roll a round to the splitter the next one comes down to replace it. Splits tossed to the left, rounds coming down on the right. I have split a cord and a half without ever getting up off the "seat". I am old with a bad back. Gotta work harder with my head than my back.

    When one does not want to roll on its own, that is what the rake next to me is for.
  9. FuzzyOne

    FuzzyOne Member

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    Central NJ
    Thanks for the "warm" welcome everyone. As for bending over....never. I use one of those padded seats with a pneumatic lever and wheels on the bottom to adjust my height. I guess they are for mechanics. Some times I'll bring a piece of plywood so I can just roll over to a stack of rounds and roll back to the splitter. Thinking about this, I must really be pretty lazy. LOL. I try not to bend or lift even though I'm only 39.
  10. FuzzyOne

    FuzzyOne Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
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    Loc:
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    That's a great system you have. Similar to my philosophy, the least I have to get up, the better off I am.

    On a side note, I just picked up an hour meter for the splitter. I like to do maintenance when it needs to be done. Bottom right is what i purchased.

    Attached Files:

  11. MrGriz

    MrGriz New Member

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    Waterford, WI
    I agree completely...I never worry about that difference...My wife on the other hand...Oh Wait...Different stroke...Never mind :red:
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