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New 6" thru-wall chimney on a budget

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by stevej8910, Oct 12, 2012.

  1. stevej8910

    stevej8910 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2008
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    Loc:
    Southern VT
    Hello,

    Due to an issue I had to remove my existing chimney with liner and repair my house. In the process I decided to install the new thru-wall chimney for my wood burning stove. I have researched the installation and have a few questions and need some advice. Any help would be appreciated.

    I have a jotul oslo 500 with 6" flue. I am installing 4' of stove pipe then turning 90 deg and going through the wall. After exiting the house the chimney needs to be 22' long. I am on the gable end and the eave extends 10" off of the house. I do not want to cut the overhang.

    1. does anyone have a preference for interior stove pipe (double or single)?
    2. Since I am on a budget I have considered using galavume or galvanized. What are the disadvantages to this? I think if I have to use stainless I was considering selkirk ultra-temp Are there any issues with this product? (I think the simpson duravent stainless is out of my budget)
    3. Can I mix interior stove pipe manufacturer with exterior chimney pipe manufacturer?
    4. Can I block out the chimney so I do not have to offset it at the overhang or should I offset the chimney at the overhang?
    5. Is there an alternate reliable manufacturer that is less expensive that selkirk or simpson?
    There was another question that I can not remember so I might edit this.

    Again. Thanks for any help.

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  2. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    1. Double or single wall stove pipe will depend on your clearance to combustibles.
    2. So long as the galvanized pipe you are looking at is SS on the inside, and gal on the outside, and rated for use with wood, then you are fine.
    3. If you are using single wall on the interior, then mixing brands doesn't matter.
    4. If you were to block out the chimney, I think it wouldn't look right against your house, but this would depend on your siding. With board and bat, you might be able to make that work and should be a bit cheaper than buying the double wall bends necessary to go around that overhang.
    5. Keep shopping online / check out local retailers and don't forget to consider shipping costs when deciding which place to purchase the product from.

    pen
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Also note that it is often several hundred dollars cheaper (less expensive fittings) to go straight up through the house. The flue stays warmer and is easier to clean. Consider this alternative.
    PapaDave likes this.
  4. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    It is also more aesthetically pleasing. If you go this route, consider Selkirk's SuperVent, available thru box stores like Lowes and Menards.
  5. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    I agree. With what has been described, through the roof sounds much better.
  6. stevej8910

    stevej8910 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2008
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    Loc:
    Southern VT
    Thanks for the replies. I have decided to go with the DuraTech Galvalume and go through the wall. I would love to run the chimney through on the inside of the house but because of the stoves location I can not easily do this. It would go through the middle of my bed or furniture in my room. For the interior I will be using a single wall pipe with a pipe shield for the 40" that it runs inside. For the exterior I am going straight up the wall and when I reach the eave overhang I will cut the overhang so I do not have to offset the chimney.

    Since I am using galvalume should I consider painting it to protect it from the possibility of rusting?
  7. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack Minister of Fire

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    I think you would need a special insulated thimble for passing a chimney flue through your bed.
  8. stevej8910

    stevej8910 Member

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    But it would keep the bed warm. Probably too warm for me.
  9. BrianK

    BrianK Guest

    I used Selkirk's SuperVent. Menards had the best price but they don't have any stores in my state. I printed out the list of what I needed from Menards and took it to my local Lowes. Lowes matched the price. It saved me about 20% compared to Lowes' standard prices. I don't know if they'll do this everywhere but my local store didn't question it.
  10. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Again Steve, I'll throw out information you probably know but is good for others too. If you are going through the wall, be sure to have a minimum of 1/4" rise (per code) per foot of horizontal pipe. We went more like 1/2" rise and it works nice.
  11. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    The offset isnt truly necessary. The eave was 10", so an extra 12" Horizontal section would have given you the 10" + 2" for clearances. I went out about the same amount and only went up 18' (Simpson Triple wall). So your 22' would have drafted fine.

    Here is a pic. I had to make custom brackets (well, a Maintenance man at work did) for the Supports every 4 ft. But it doesn't look to bad. IMO anyways.

    Good luck on the install. Looking forward to pics.
    2012-10-01_16-52-02_787.jpg
  12. blel

    blel Feeling the Heat

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    I have a new 6" thru the wall kit that you are welcome to if you want it. I am in southeast CT
  13. stevej8910

    stevej8910 Member

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    To follow up on my project. I have attached a few pics of the deterioration, deconstruction, and reconstruction. I moved the hearth from the back to the front of the house and installed the thruwall chimney. I went with Lowes and bought the supervent. I had them price match some of Menards prices. This was the most economical solution. I did have an issue with Lowes but that was their online customer service and a young inexperienced store customer service rep. All in all the management at Lowes resolved the issue.

    One issue that I have with the new chimney is that for the past few weeks I have had a low draft. I started thinking that it was the wet heavy air that we have had. I noticed smoke coming out of the cap so I thought that there was some flow. I cleaned the stove inside and out. Removed all the interior stove pipe and cleaned that out. Checked the exterior clean out (about 1/2 full) and still had a low draft. Smoke was seeping through the stove pipe when the chimney was getting back up to temperature in the mornings. If the stove was below 225 degrees I had issues. I was going to pull the cap this weekend to see if there was a creosote build up at the cap or if the cap wasn't allowing enough air to draft. Last night I was sitting near the stove and I hear a noise in the chimney pipe. I thought it sounded like an animal moving but thought an animal couldn't survive the smoke.

    This morning the stove was running like new. I wondered what the noise was from the night before and checked the clean out. It was full of creosote. I dumped the clean out and found a solid 4" high cylindrical piece of creosote. My assumption is that it built-up at the 15 degree elbow. I know my wood wasn't as dry as it should be. That is because I spent a lot of my wood time fixing my chimney.

    So now I wonder if cutting the eave and removing the elbows would work better. But then I think if the elbows weren't there would the creosote built up at the cap? When I talked to my local installer about the low draft last week he mentioned that the outside chimney has a greater temperature difference and doesn't stay as warm as if it were an interior run. Could the difference in temperature also cause more of a creosote issue?

    Thanks for reading through this message. Any advice would be appreciated. It looks like for about $60 I can buy a chimney sweep kit and could then clean the chimney in the middle of the burning season if needed.

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  14. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Thats a shame the old chase had to come down. That would have been perfect to run the new stack up and out.

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