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New guy with some Jotul 602 questions

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by pfettig77, Feb 16, 2014.

  1. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    Hi all. I've been reading a lot of the tips and tricks on this website for a couple months so I decided to join the conversation. I tried to search all the forums before I asked my questions, but if my questions have already been answered, feel free to redirect me. I've been heating my house in NW Wisconsin for 9 winters (7 of them have been with only the woodstove) with a Quadrafire Cumberland Gap and I really like it. I recently bought a 602 to heat our entryway/mudroom which is open to the house and seems to always be sending cold air in. I may have been a little hasty in buying it because it has some (hopefully solvable) issues.

    One is that the door doesn't seem to want to shut enough to latch it. Everything is straight and true as far as the casting goes and the gasket looks perfectly normal. Any ideas?

    I have a pdf file of for the old stoves. Is it correct that I can divide the clearances in half with a properly built non-flammable wall and a 1" space behind?

    Does anyone know how far back or forward the top baffle plate should sit? What is it supposed to sit on? Right now it's resting in there at an angle with one side sitting on the side burn plate hangers. Thanks!

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  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Baffle should rest against the rear of the stove. I think there is a dip in (curve) which sits into a small cast shelf in the rear casting.

    In terms of the door latch, you can either remove the heavy spring steel U and pack it out with a couple washers or else bend it outward so that the latch catches it. The gasket should compress after a while - maybe it was put in with too much glue, etc....or, the older gaskets can turn rock hard. Either way, you should be able to adjust the catch.

    As far as clearances, a sheet of metal spaced 1" off the wall will reduce clearances by 2/3. Most cement boards are rated to reduce it to the original wall by 50%. Here are some NFPA charts
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/wiki/nfpa-wall-clearance-reductions/
  3. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    Wow! That was quick and informative. Thanks. I read that clearance page on here before but the link for clearance reductions was broken. I was thinking about bending the steel U but I thought maybe it was cast and I didn't want to break it. I'll try that.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Does the door close flush with the stove body? Before adjusting the latch be sure that the door is not bumping into something like the baffle. If so the baffle is not set properly.
  5. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    I just went and looked at it. It doesn't close quite flush, but there's nothing in the way. The hook is permanently attached and I'm afraid to bend it on the stove. The gasket is pretty hard and I will replace it, but it has a deep groove so I'd be surprised if the depth of the gasket is preventing it from closing. The gasket looks small - do I need to buy a certain size/diameter?
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    It could be that someone put in too large a gasket or if it is very stiff, maybe they used too much adhesive. I think this stove takes a 3/8" gasket.
  7. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    OK. I'll just redo it. Replacing it isn't a bad idea anyway.
  8. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    It may be that you need to lift the door a bit - etc.
    Remove the door pins and press the door against the front....and see it is seems to fit and where the hinges are. Some small washers can lift it up a bit.

    And, yes, that U is made out of steel and made to be bent.
  9. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    Thanks - I'll try those things.
  10. defiant3

    defiant3 Feeling the Heat

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    Hold up! Not to be disagreeable at all, but I seem to recall that 3/8" gasketing on an old 602 would be problematic? Not a big deal, but if 3/8" does the same thing that is happening now, don't be afraid to go to 5/16" or even 1/4" if that's what works.
    webbie likes this.
  11. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    OK - I'll look at the smaller ones. The groove is pretty small. Hopefully I can find a place near here with different size gaskets like that. The local big box (Menards) only seemed to have big honkin' gaskets.
  12. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, it would be 5/16" if a loose fitting type - the original was harder asbestos which was 1/4" or so.....

    Sometimes glue is spread too heavily or the gasket gets too old or hot and gets rock-hard.
  13. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    OK. Thanks.
    I don't know if I should have started a new thread for this (feel free to let me know), but at the joints there is some material flaking out from narrow gaps where the pieces meet (on the outside). Could that be the cement and if so, what should I do?
  14. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    In a dark room put a bright light inside the stove and look for light leaks at the seams. If they show up seal with furnace cement or consider a rebuild this summer. It's about a 2 hr. job for this little stove.
  15. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    Right after I bought it I tried that in my pitch black basement using my super bright tactical flashlight and didn't see any light. Maybe I'll try it again and have my wife inspect the back and other parts I can't see.
  16. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    I know this has been brought up before, but I REALLY only want to punch one hole in my ceiling. If I'm reading everything correctly, these should be the clearances from the wall to the stove using the old 602 manual (for my older 602). The black is the spacing if there's no wall protection. The blue is the spacing if there's some type of cement board wall protection and the red is the spacing if there's 24 gauge steel. Does this all look correct? It's a pretty small space in a pretty small room so I want to put it as tight into the corner as possible.

    Attached Files:

  17. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    I posted this picture as a new thread but didn't get any bites. Here's what I wrote:

    I know this has been brought up before, but I REALLY only want to punch one hole in my ceiling. If I'm reading everything correctly, these should be the clearances from the wall to the stove using the old 602 manual (for my older 602). The black is the spacing if there's no wall protection. The blue is the spacing if there's some type of cement board wall protection and the red is the spacing if there's 24 gauge steel. Does this all look correct? It's a pretty small space in a pretty small room so I want to put it as tight into the corner as possible.

    jotul clearances.jpg
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 19, 2014
  18. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I'm not sure where these numbers are coming from. The closest you can reduce the clearances down to are 12" rear and sides with NFPA wall shielding. A proper shield needs to have 1" spacing behind it and to be off the floor by 1" and open at the top for good ventilation behind the shield. It doesn't matter if the shield is made out of steel or cement board. The rules are the same.

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/stove_wall_clear
  19. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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  20. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    Yep, that's the manual I used. I just took the 32" and the 24" and reduced them by 50% and 66% (depending on the shield material) because I thought that's how it worked. I was planning on the 1" gap behind and at the bottom. I just wasn't sure if there was a minimum that you couldn't go beyond (like the 8" behind and the 10.6" to the side).
  21. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    I just took the 32" and the 24" and reduced them by 50% and 66% (depending on the shield material) because I thought that's how it worked (see the second post above). I do know about the 1" gap behind and at the bottom. I just wasn't sure if there was a minimum that you couldn't go beyond (like the 8" behind and the 10.6" to the side). I'm using the older 602 manual to get the original numbers. I'm glad I asked because it looks like I'm not quite getting this.
  22. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

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    I have a old 602 that was never used and the gasket is very small, like the thickness of a pencil.
  23. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

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    Is it normal for the latch to need a slight bump down to seat firmly. I have no smoke or draft issues and am very happy with the stove's performance so I thought it was normal or would loosen up over time.
  24. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    I have to push on mine so hard that the stove moves (or grab the firebox for leverage). Yours is downright loose compared to mine.
  25. pfettig77

    pfettig77 New Member

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    I actually found the info in the new manual. It says 1/4". Assuming that the old ones are the same size, that's what I'll go with.

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