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New member seeking advice on really old wood stove...

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Deltaguy, Aug 14, 2011.

  1. Deltaguy

    Deltaguy New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Maryland
    Hello,

    I recently came across this stove and had a few things I wanted to find out about it. Thought maybe I could get some answers from the members here. I would like to restore it and use it as a heat source in my 2,200 square foot house.

    Here is a picture of the stove...
    [​IMG]

    It is about 30" wide X 47" high (on it's stand) X 20" deep.

    What I'd like to know...

    1. Who is it made by and how old is it? The only thing I could find on it, as far as markings, was the letters "REH" and "24RDUP".

    2. Any idea if I could burn wood and coal in it?

    3. If I were to restore it, I'd strip all the rust and paint from it and then re-paint it. What kind of paint would hold up to the heat? Lowes has a Rustoleum brand spray paint that resist up to 2000 degrees. Is that enough?

    Thanks for any help!
    Rob

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  2. Fsappo

    Fsappo New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    3,551
    Loc:
    Central NY
    I have no idea what brand of stove that is.

    I see you mentioned "A" heat source, not "The" heat source. This is probably a good thing. To me "The" heat source would require 24/7 burning which I would not say that stove is suited for...unless you did burn coal.

    I do see the under fire air, but I don’t see a way to shake the grates for coal burning, aside from that little stub coming out from the right side. But it's hard to see what the function of that piece is.

    Primary heating dictates allowing a stove to run unattended. Not something I suggest with a stove that old.

    For paint, just google "Rutland Stove Paint" and you'll find it easy enough.

    This appears to be something suited more for occasional use and nostalgia. Don’t get me wrong, nostalgia is nothing to be underestimated.
  3. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,247
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    At first glance this looks authentic - that is, not one of the many copies of older stoves sold from about 1965 to 1980.

    Does it have legs? Or a base?

    This seems to be a Parlor Stove type of design. As you can see, there are many different types:
    http://www.goodtimestove.com/heating_stoves/antique_stoves_parlor.html

    My opinion of it's authenticity comes from the double front doors. The cheap taiwan parlor stoves looked more like this:
    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/4538/#188453

    It would be best to buy either stove bright brand (forest paint) or thermalox - both are well regarded stove paint.

    As to using the stove to heat your house, this would depend on the stove being in very good condition as far as the seams, the castings (not any large cracks, etc.) AND a good and safe installation. This will require an up to date chimney as well as proper wall and floor protection. Many would suggest contacting both your insurance company and the local building official prior to installation.

    As to an exact model, your best bet is to get some better pictures and email them to some of the antique stove experts on the web - folks like:
    Goodtime Stoves
    and
    http://stovehospital.com/

    They might just be able to ID it for you.
  4. Deltaguy

    Deltaguy New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Maryland
    Thanks for all your help with this!

    As far as legs / base goes, I thought it just sat on the base it is on. Do you think it's missing legs?

    Here are a few more pictures....

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  5. Fsappo

    Fsappo New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    3,551
    Loc:
    Central NY
    That notch towards the front makes it looks like a leg would go there. Really should be obvious if you tipped the stove back and looked at the bottom.

    Craig brings up an excellent point, which I missed. In some areas, a non UL listed solid fuel burning appliance can NOT be sold. I'd takes Craigs advice and check with the AHJ.

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