1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

New to wood stoves - How to keep it going over night?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by ItsCold, Nov 20, 2013.

  1. ItsCold

    ItsCold New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2013
    Messages:
    14
    Loc:
    Northern New England
    Hi All,

    Just signed up for this forum today. I hope my question fits in here, if not please feel free to move it.

    Anyway, I just bought a new house this past summer in Northern New England. The upper floor (Living Room, Dining Room and kitchen) is heated (adequately) by an Osburn 1800 High Efficiency wood stove ( http://www.fireplacesnow.com/produc...57-sub-88252?gclid=COSH5KHX87oCFcVQ7AodU3oAvQ ).

    It works really well and during the day, my wife and daughter are nice and cozy. However, now that nights are getting cooler and cooler, I am having trouble of keeping the stove going over night. I load it up before we go to bed around 9.45pm. When I get up at 6.30am, all the glowing coal stuff is gone, just ash left and the stove is basically cold (let alone the room).

    I was wondering if you guys/experts have some tips for me as to how I can keep it going through the night? For some time, I used to get up at 2 - 3am in the morning and refill the stove but we have a baby and sleep is rare and precious.

    Why can't we just have an electric ignition system for wood stoves (similar to pellet stoves)? That'd be neat!

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. 2stoveshome

    2stoveshome New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2013
    Messages:
    30
    Loc:
    MA
    Lopi has the GreenStart Wood Stove Igniter on some of its model. It said the fire can be started with just a push of the button if you have well seasoned wood. Never saw it in person and don't know how well works. From the video, it seems to be really cool.
    http://aksportingjournal.com/lopi-introduces-the-greenstart-wood-stove-igniter/

  3. ItsCold

    ItsCold New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2013
    Messages:
    14
    Loc:
    Northern New England
    I was looking at the video but it seems that is only available for some models and certainly not for my 5 year old stove :(

    Nice idea, however! That is what I was thinking about.
  4. siddfynch

    siddfynch New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Loc:
    Southcentral AK
    So basically, you are re-loading the stove around 9:45, and the wood is completely burned by morning, with no coals?

    In my stove, burn time this winter is definitely a function of what wood I'm burning (higher BTU wood is better), seasoning (the same wood batch last winter did not throw as much heat), how full the stove is, and how I load it.

    For this latter, my longest burn times have been when I have a hot coal bed (no real wood left) and still-hot stove, load a bunch of fresh new wood directly on the coals, and turn the air inlets way down. The new wood smolders, but takes quite awhile to start burning, and when it does it goes slowly and evenly. I tried this while at home all day one day, and wasn't even sure at first it would catch, I had the air down so low. That gives me a hot coal bed about 8 hrs later. By contrast, I was not getting as long of times when I threw equivalent wood on a still burning fire, and/or left the air open more at the start of the new fire.

    Beyond that, harder wood, larger pieces, and fuller loads would all help. I'm still figuring out to stretch it myself.
  5. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,537
    Loc:
    Salisbury, MD
    It is about impossible to expect a 1.8 cu ft wood stove to hold a fire for 8 hours, however if you are using seasoned oak you should have some coals left buried in the ash.
  6. ItsCold

    ItsCold New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2013
    Messages:
    14
    Loc:
    Northern New England
    So you are saying that - reasonably - if I expect to have coals left in the morning, I would need a bigger stove, correct?
  7. dmmoss51

    dmmoss51 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
    Messages:
    355
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Your burn rate is going to be determined by adjusting the variables fuel and oxygen... more fuel and less oxygen will burn longer. In addition to the amount of fuel is type of fuel.

    Some folks will say larger splits burn longer and I think that is mostly because of volume rather than true size. Using smaller splits to really get a tight pack in the wood stove as opposed to larges splits with more airspace may get you more volume of fuel in the stove. The smaller splits having more surface area would burn faster than large spits with the same amount of air, so lower the air accordingly.
  8. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,537
    Loc:
    Salisbury, MD
    Correct.
  9. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,523
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    go real big and you get to wake up at 3 to close windows instead ...
  10. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Messages:
    1,221
    Loc:
    SE Mass

    I'm at 1.5 cu ft. At best I have had just as you said, some smaller hot coals under the ash. And that's going to bed at 12:30, not 9:45.
  11. ItsCold

    ItsCold New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2013
    Messages:
    14
    Loc:
    Northern New England
    Meh, too bad.

    What wood stove would be adequate for my situation then? Space is about 700 sqft. I am also open to pellet stoves. My father in law has a harman P43 (I believe) and that thing is awesome.

    If I could defy the laws of physics I'd also heat downstairs (another 700sqft). Unfortunately, heat won't travel downwards. Downstairs consists of three bedrooms and one bathroom. I can't put a wood/pellet stove there.
  12. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,537
    Loc:
    Salisbury, MD
    You should start another thread with a layout and what your current setup is, pictures help.

    700 sq feet is a small amount to heat and a larger stove will run you out quick so I understand why you choose that stove.

    Pellet stoves with their ability to regulate heat is something I would look at for sure, fill the hopper and go.
  13. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,768
    Loc:
    Chittenden, VT
    Tough layout. Maybe better suited for a wood furnace? Otherwise, I would suggest a catalytic stove like the Blazeking Sirocco/Chinook 20 or the Woodstock Keystone. Their heat output is more adjustable so they will not roast you in the early stages of the burn. Is the problem just the burn time or do you have problems getting the upper floor heated with the Osburn during the day, too? How does the stove do when it is really cold outside?
  14. ItsCold

    ItsCold New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2013
    Messages:
    14
    Loc:
    Northern New England
    I don't have any problems heating with the stove during the day. Once the fire started, it's nice and warm. It is really just bothering that I can't have a warm upper floor in the morning and have to start anew each morning. If there would be just a bit coal left so that new wood would take right off, that'd be great. Unfortunately, that's not the case.
  15. Rickb

    Rickb Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2012
    Messages:
    539
    Loc:
    St.Louis
    running the sirroco in my basement its around 750sqft finished and it was still 78F this morning after 9 hours with lots of coals left.
  16. siddfynch

    siddfynch New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Loc:
    Southcentral AK
    Still though...have you tried wringing the longest burn time possible using "best practices" just to make sure you really CANT have hot coals in the morning? Seasoned oak, added to bed of hot coals, air way down, stove packed full, etc.?
  17. ItsCold

    ItsCold New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2013
    Messages:
    14
    Loc:
    Northern New England
    I'd love to run a stove (pellet/wood) in my basement. Unfortunately, all of the rooms are bedrooms :/ I'm looking at the sirroco for upstairs.
  18. ItsCold

    ItsCold New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2013
    Messages:
    14
    Loc:
    Northern New England
    No, the previous owner had quite a fair amount of beech stacked which I am still using. I ordered wood for the 1st week of December. A mix of maple and oak according to the company that delivers.
  19. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,537
    Loc:
    Salisbury, MD
    Don't count on that to be ready to burn unless it is kiln dried.
  20. BCC_Burner

    BCC_Burner Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2013
    Messages:
    318
    Loc:
    Wasatch Front: 7800'

    I would go as far as to say, count on that not being ready to burn unless it is kiln dried.
  21. ItsCold

    ItsCold New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2013
    Messages:
    14
    Loc:
    Northern New England
    What do you mean? Our realtor told us that the wood had been dried for several seasons. I thought I could use it?
  22. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,716
    Loc:
    WNY
    We heat about 700 sq ft with a 2.2 CU FT stove and unless we screw up with loading/air control, we aren't being cooked out. If they had been out when we bought our stove (and I had heard of BK) I would have looked at a Sirocco though, mostly for the longer shoulder season burn times.
  23. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,716
    Loc:
    WNY

    I'll venture to guess they're talking about the wood you've got ordered for delviery next month.
  24. ItsCold

    ItsCold New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2013
    Messages:
    14
    Loc:
    Northern New England
    Oh, I see. Yes, the wood I am about to get is kiln dried. My neighbors get their wood from this guy for the past 20 years and they are very happy with the quality.
  25. Sons924

    Sons924 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    235
    does the stove pass the dollar bill test?

Share This Page