New wood supply

Mr.Hardwoods Posted By Mr.Hardwoods, Feb 8, 2013 at 11:18 AM

  1. Mr.Hardwoods

    Mr.Hardwoods
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    Dec 29, 2012
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    My dad and his neighbor opened their land up for me to harvest (130 acres).:) I am limited to standing dead trees or fallen trees though. I have always burned ash but it is limited in their woods. They have a lot of cherry, white oak, maple, and some ironwood. How do these species burn and approximately how long do they take to season? Also there were several white oak that fell in a wind storm in febuary 2011 and were easily accessible so I started into them hoping to use it next year. I tried to take a few small pieces (3 inch in diameter) and toss them in my fireplace to see how they burn. They burn like they were cut off a living tree.... I thought they would burn after laying down for two years, sad face. If I split and stack this stuff is it feasible to burn it next year?
     
  2. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover
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    Welcome Mr. Hardwoods. :) There are a lot of 'Mr Hardwoods' around this place though... ==c

    Gotta be split and stacked so the wind can blow through, preferably in single rows. My goal, based mostly on what I've read here about Oak, is two years on dead standing, three on live trees. Two years on everything else. That should yield primo wood. That said, Cherry and Ash will dry pretty well in a year. I've found soft Maple to dry even faster.
    Your Cherry would be a good bet for next year. If you're around the house and can feed the stove more often, the shorter burn time isn't a problem (same for soft Maple.)
     
  3. tfdchief

    tfdchief
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    Welcome to the Forum. The species you mentioned are ALL good stuff, some better than Ash, IMO. Ironwood and White Oak.....it doesn't get any better than that. As for seasoning, some can be ready in a year, 2 years is better. Some dead standing in less time. Burning in a fireplace is a lot different than a wood stove, so you might night see as much difference, but it is always best to season wood adequately, regardless what you are burning it in.
     
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  4. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover
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    I forgot to mention that. Sometimes the top branches, even of Oak, might be ready in the Fall if split on the small side and stacked now. A cheap moisture meter (Harbor Fright, Lowe's etc) might help you cull out the stuff that has a chance to burn later this year.
     
  5. Blue2ndaries

    Blue2ndaries
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    Welcome and what an ideal set-up! How far away is your dad's property? I concur w/what's already been said re: seasoning time. Longer the better.
     
  6. muncybob

    muncybob
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    130 acres...good for you! I have only about 20 or so that I can take from but it and CL keps me in wood year round. Nothing wrong with cherry & maple, that's mainly what I have access to and has kept us warm while the oak is drying. I'm letting all my oak dry 3 yrs before burning.
     
  7. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands
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    I would grab the Cherry,Maple then the Ironwood, after that the White Oak even though it takes longer to season.
     
  8. gzecc

    gzecc
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    I would have this strategy if I were in your shoes. Look for anything dead (standing or down) besides oak. Buck it split it and stack it asap, off the ground in a sunny spot. After you have sufficient cords seasoning you can then start with the oaks. The oaks take a minimum of 2 years. Most other hard woods are acceptable after one.
     
  9. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy
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    Welcome to the family! Nice catch, you should be set for a long time to come! Oak cut live 3 years, dead 2 and maybe some small stuff from the top next year. Cherry if split and stacked quickly, maybe next year.
     
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  10. loadstarken

    loadstarken
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    Dang that is awesome!

    I would love to manage that many acres!
     
  11. Mr.Hardwoods

    Mr.Hardwoods
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    Thanks everyone for the input.
    Blue my dad lives about 15 minutes from my house. Not too bad.
     
  12. Blue2ndaries

    Blue2ndaries
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    Not too bad indeed!
     
  13. Dune

    Dune
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    Standing dead barkless, no twigs, most branches gone could conceivably be burned right away, especially cherry. Maple blowdowns may be ready if they are not flat on the ground and have been down awhile.
    Oak pretty much doesn't start seasoning until it is cut, split and stacked, but is pretty much the best wood there is. Ironwood is a regional misnomer, but anything that is called ironwood in your area is likely excellent fuel.
    With the oak, if you choose to cut the small stuff, say 1-2.5" or so, it will season in half the time of the rounds and splits.
     
  14. bogydave

    bogydave
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    That'd be a lot of fun having an almost endless supply of wood to process.
    Get a bunch CSS (Cut Split & Stacked) & post a few pictures along the way. :)

    Welcome aboard
     
  15. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy
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    Hey, I forgot the only rule on this forum: PICTURES OR IT DIDN'T HAPPEN!==c
     
  16. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    Welcome to the forum Mr.Hardwoods. Looks like we aren't too far apart.

    It appears you have an ideal situation with the wood. Pick and choose.

    As for the limited ash, that will be extremely limited very soon. All ours is dead.

    Cutting standing dead trees can be both a blessing and a curse. For sure the worst thing is not knowing how rotten the middle of the tree is. Second is the widow makers. Dead limbs can fall off even from the vibration of the cutting so watch out below! Don't take chances.

    We recommend getting 3 years ahead on your wood supply. This will solve 99% of all wood burning related problems. In addition, if you can't cut some winter, then you still have wood to burn. It can be tough getting 3 years ahead but is well worth the time and effort.

    You mention cherry, white oak, maple and ironwood. Not sure on the maple if it is hard or soft maple. Soft maple can be ready to burn in 6 months after being split. Hard maple needs a year. Cherry can dry quite fast too but a year is good on that. White oak; always plan on 3 years after being split. Ironwood, a year.

    fwiw, we got some white oak this year that has been laying on the ground for 10 years. It might be ready to burn in 2 years but is doubtful. The wood is all good but not dry.

    When you cut and split the wood, try to stack it off the ground. We just cut saplings in the woods and stack on those. We stack about 4 1/2' high and leave the stack uncovered that first summer and fall. Then we cover the top of the stack and wait for Mother Nature to do her thing and dry the wood. Most of our wood does not get burned until it has been in the stack 3 years or longer.
     
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  17. Mr.Hardwoods

    Mr.Hardwoods
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    This is a buddy that was helping me out. Using an old a@! Chainsaw but it worked great.
     
  18. BobUrban

    BobUrban
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    Welcome neighbor - Another Michigander here and I am very happy for you and the woods you have to pick and choose from. With 130 acres you will never run out of dead and downed trees. Great, great people here on the forum so take advantage - the help and advice are free and sometimes we even have fun :)

    My advice is to work with a plan that allows you to cut places you have the easiest access to and if you have a quad or tractor work so that you have a trail to get in/out. Trailers are great but you can skid bigger stuff out if that is not available. Much easier than hauling rounds one and two at a time any distance.

    Take the downed stuff first - felling is probably the most dangerous part of cutting and with 130 acres you should have a lifetime of mother nature felled trees from storms and such.

    Invest in safety gear for cutting if you do not have it already. Saws are very unforgiving and one lazy or accidental oops can be life changing. Chaps, eyes, ears, etc..

    have fun and keep posting pics - we all love pics!!

    Bob
     
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  19. bogydave

    bogydave
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    Great pictures :)
    Lots of wood to be cut up.
    Gonna make a nice stack big stack ;)
     
  20. Locust Post

    Locust Post
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    Welcome Mr H.

    Sounds like a great gig you landed on 130 acres. Can't say enough what Bob mentioned. There have been a few threads on here showing just the littlest slip without chaps and not a pretty sight. Took me a long time to listen and glad I did. BUT just about a month ago in my haste I forgot to put my chaps on and low and behold while limbing the saw grazed my pant leg. Fourtunatly just the pants leg but it sure was a good wake up call.
    We look forward to more photos of your adventures.
     
  21. TimJ

    TimJ
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    That's some good cutting there.....hope its as easy to get out as it is to get
     
  22. red oak

    red oak
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    Welcome! Looks like a great supply of wood!
     
  23. Redlegs

    Redlegs
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    130 acres like that picture will keep you busy. Welcome to the forum.
     

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