1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

not cut to length garbage!

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by ColdNH, Oct 5, 2010.

  1. ColdNH

    ColdNH Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2009
    Messages:
    540
    Loc:
    Bow, NH
    Got one of those scores that is hard to complain about.

    Long story short, Some rich guy bought a hosue 3 years ago, and in his "carriage house" was a solid 2/3+ of a cord of split red oak, white oak and birch that sat there for 3+ years (it was there when he moved in) Well he finally got around to having his "help" post it on craigslist as a truckload of hard wood for 20$. me thinks great, even if its just a truck load its worth checking out. I drive down there and low and behold its at least 2 FULL/Overloaded truck loads of very well seasoned hard woods all for a whopping 20$

    Got one load tonight, going back for another load tommarow on my lunch break. Im tempted to throw the "help" another 20$

    So as the title says, the only downside is 80% of the splits are cut in 20-24" lengths. So now I ponder "Do i cut these in half or do i cut them to 16-18" lengths and end up with pancakes?"

    Attached Files:

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    Messages:
    6,770
    Loc:
    Syracuse NY
    That is all I get. The little I cut gets cut to my ideal length and the shorties get tossed in a pile to be burned before the snow starts to pile up.

    BTW, nice load for 20 bucks.
  3. Occo370

    Occo370 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Messages:
    170
    Loc:
    Jersey Shore
    I'm not too much of a stickler. I'd cut in half
  4. burntime

    burntime New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    2,395
    Loc:
    C'mon hunting season!
    Both, then you can have those pieces to really stuff the stove...
  5. Pine Knot

    Pine Knot Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2007
    Messages:
    149
    Loc:
    Southwest Virginia
    In half, at about 45 degree angle. They will stack a little better.
  6. wood spliter

    wood spliter New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2010
    Messages:
    854
    Loc:
    Long Island, ny
    I get allot like that. I just cut them in half.. Most of the ones I get are 20". I think I'll give what Pine Knot said a shot with the angle.
  7. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    Messages:
    4,082
    Loc:
    Central PA
    I think I'd cut them in half. It would be easier, and I wouldn't mind the pieces being a little small.
  8. Chargerman

    Chargerman Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2009
    Messages:
    369
    Loc:
    SW Wisconsin
    I would burn them just like that in my stove. :)
  9. Monkey Wrench

    Monkey Wrench Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2009
    Messages:
    304
    Loc:
    On The Farm
    Congrats on the Score!! :coolsmile:

    Before my new insert I cut 4+ cords at 22"-24". So I just set up my my table saw at 16" and cut. The drops are what I burn during shoulder season.
  10. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Great find. Cut them however you will be comfortable handling and burning.
  11. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,825
    ColdNH I would cut it 16-18 and save the short pieces for burning after starting a fire, this will also make it easier for stacking.


    zap
  12. 'bert

    'bert Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    842
    Loc:
    East of the Rockies West of the Rest, North of 49
    If you cut them in half would they work well to burn North / South in your stove?
  13. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    15,237
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    Nice score . . . for the record I would cut to the 16 inch length and use the chunks for the shoulder season.
  14. ColdNH

    ColdNH Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2009
    Messages:
    540
    Loc:
    Bow, NH
    all good points, i may just cut them to length and use the scraps for starter wood/filler wood as i tend not to burn completely 24/7 so I tend to restart every once in a while and I dont have much kindling set aside currently

    Whats the best method for cutting this to length with a chainsaw?
  15. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    Messages:
    6,770
    Loc:
    Syracuse NY
    Not sure its the best, but I screwed a 2x8 down the middle of a pallet so the splits hang off the edges. Then line them up and cut in batches while standing on them. The other method often mentioned is building a frame, strapping them and then batch cutting.
  16. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    5,740
    Loc:
    Northern MI - in the mitten
    That's not garbage. That right there is a nice score! Do what you like with it, and tell us of the outcome.
    You could use the small cutoffs on a nice bed of coals to warm the house in the morning.
    So many choices.
  17. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,477
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    trim just one end
  18. homebrewz

    homebrewz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Messages:
    933
    Loc:
    East Central, NY
    First, I think it would a good thing to give his assistant a tip for the great score.

    A table saw would make quick work of it. Or you could make a jig to hold the lengths in place for your chainsaw.
    Nothing wrong with having a pile of oak chunks to fill up the corners of the stove.
  19. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    Would need a table saw with a 12-14" blade to be able to cut it without having to turn the log several times. Easier to just use a chainsaw IMO.
  20. nocdpc

    nocdpc New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    45
    Loc:
    Northeast CT
    Cut them to your regular desired lengths and use the rest for off season burning as others have said. This will help with the stacking. The ends will not go to waste as wood is wood. Nice price btw!
  21. formula_pilot

    formula_pilot Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    76
    Loc:
    New England -CT New Haven County
    That oak would also overheat and dull out the table saw blades, unless cut real slooow....... and that would get old real fast. Until a practical light saber is invented, the chainsaw is the tool for firewood. I do not know how people heated with wood before the invention of the chainsaw.
  22. westkywood

    westkywood Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2009
    Messages:
    366
    Loc:
    Kentucky
    If you dont want to use a table saw. Take 4 posts and make a frame that makes "a slot" to stack the wood in where the ends you wanna cut off stick out from the posts. You then just take the saw and cut off all the ends. It holds the wood in place. Make sense?? I make it about 5 feet high. I put a piece of scrap wood on the bottom so the saw doesnt hit the ground.
    Looking down from the top, the posts would look something like this..

    @ @
    End of wood sticks out here
    @ @
  23. ColdNH

    ColdNH Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2009
    Messages:
    540
    Loc:
    Bow, NH
    not a bad idea, sounds safer then standing on the logs and pretty quick and easy to put together, may just try this out!

  24. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,825
    ColdNH I made this last year, seems that it worked for my needs.


    zap

    Attached Files:

  25. Skier76

    Skier76 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2009
    Messages:
    1,276
    Loc:
    CT and VT
    I've got a short firebox, so I love the chunks for starting fires. I lay regular splits east west, put in a super cedar, chunks north/south, then a split on top. Light the cedar and I'm good to go.

Share This Page