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Pacific energy Summit Classic

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by 2000SI-G, Dec 21, 2011.

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  1. 2000SI-G

    2000SI-G Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    Messages:
    22
    Loc:
    Eastern Quebec
    Hi everyone,I have been reading post about the pacific energy woodstove for the last 3-4 days.The summit looks pretty interesting.
    I have stop at the local distributor tonight to get some pricing and a bit of info on this stove.According to PE the stove i would need the spectrum ...up to 2000sq. ft.My house is 24x32 plus basement same size.
    The sles rep. is telling me I should go with the summit.Like alot of members here Im thinking the same ...I radther do a small fire in this lager box then push the smaller box of the spectrum to much in Jan-Feb.Right now I have a Drolet contempro 2000 (Drolet is a popular brand here in Quebec).for heating up to 2000sq.ft.The way that my house is built I find that I have some cold spot so I will have to try to get that cold air moving.
    I would be installing the PE in my basement that I have almost completely renovated.The stove would be in the den ,so I also want to be able to sit down and relax watching tv and that new stove without beeing to hot.
    Heres a few pics of the set up in the basement.
    [​IMG]
    I will be covering the walls with some cultured stone in a week or two.
    [​IMG]
    This is a grill to let the warm/hot air upstairs.
    [​IMG]
    You can see the grill on the kitchen floor.Since I have install this one ,the heat is alot better on the main floor.
    [​IMG]
    This is my stair case .The heat has a hard time coming up this way.I was thinking about installing a fan to push the air down the stairs.That way the air would be forced down and bac up thru the grill in the kitchen.
    [​IMG]
    this is the little hall that brings you to the stairs,right after the gallons of paint.

    As Gunner had mentionned in a post (I know what you guys are going to tell me) dated 2006:
    Tell me if I'm wrong but this is how I see it, the summit is only "hotter" because of the ability to load more wood, if I loaded it to the capacity of the spectrum it would heat like a spectrum right?I realize there is a slightly larger surface area on the summit to radiate heat but lets say you got 3 splits in the spectrum and 3 splits in the summit (imagine the wood is identical) you'd get the same amount of heat right?

    My question is what would you fellow members recommend acording to your experiences?
    I'm thinking summit but maybe I'm wrong.I want to decide within 2 weeks because PE have a 300$ rebate(free blower)

    thanks and happy holidays to all
    Marc

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  2. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2006
    Messages:
    7,117
    Loc:
    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    How big is the room the stove is going in? Yes you can do smaller fires in the Summit. You can also do larger splits, and get the long burn times and slower release of heat also.

    The vent is actually a nono, but you gotta do what you gotta do. I would myself, look for a fusible link damper to put in the vent system. Ran some vent & ducts here myself, but used fire rated fusible dampers.
    If you unfortunate;y have a fire down there, now there is nothing to slow the spread up through that vent to the next story of the house. Faster fire spread time, means lost evacuation time. Just saying, you do what you must. Try to do it as safe as possible is my only suggestion there.
  3. tim1

    tim1 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2011
    Messages:
    135
    Loc:
    columbia river gorge,portland or
    I had the same thought, went with the summit for the larger firebox and the extended burn. Some say the extended burn is hype, don't know yet. Bigger stove has the ability to heat more space when needed, simple. Looks like you just need to move the air around to fit your needs, will be a good set up. Tim
  4. 2000SI-G

    2000SI-G Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    Messages:
    22
    Loc:
    Eastern Quebec
    Thanks Inferno and tim1.That idea of the grill on the floor never came to my mind.I will get this issue look after.Inferno for your question about the size of the room the stove will be in ,I will get that tonight and get back to you.So according to you 2 the summit is not "overkill"?
    thanks
  5. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    7,117
    Loc:
    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    The heat should naturally want to work upwards. And you can always burn smaller loads. And in the coldest nights, you will have the extra to get more heat out.
    If the stove room is small, and the heat doe not travel well. You may get warm in there.
  6. 2000SI-G

    2000SI-G Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    Eastern Quebec
    Just got some mesure .The room size is 22'x13'
  7. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Loc:
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    High ceilings or standard height? 286sf is a fairly small area.
    not sure the heat is going to move around like you need.
  8. 2000SI-G

    2000SI-G Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    Eastern Quebec
    standard heigh 8'
  9. 2000SI-G

    2000SI-G Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    Messages:
    22
    Loc:
    Eastern Quebec
    standard heigh 8'
  10. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    9,226
    Loc:
    Lake Wissota
    Id take that wall down next to your stairwell and put up an open railing to let more warm air up from the basement. That grill may turn into more of a cold air return to the basement than warm air supply. The stairwell will be the main source of heat from the basement.
  11. madison

    madison Minister of Fire

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    Hopefully you do not have to lug the wood down the stairs, i'ld get hot just carrying the wood to the stove.
  12. 2000SI-G

    2000SI-G Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    Messages:
    22
    Loc:
    Eastern Quebec
    No ,on the first pic you can see the door frame on the right.lots of wood on the other side.
  13. Fort Wisers

    Fort Wisers New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2012
    Messages:
    49
    Loc:
    Oxford Mills, Ontario, Canada
    Hey 2000SI-G,
    I know your thread is from last year so I'm not sure if you picked up a stove or not.
    We are located in Eastern Ontario so we have similar winters to you (depending on where you are in Quebec).
    We are running a PE Summit Classic in the basement. Our home is about 2500 sqft total......
    We have used the stove for 100% of our winter heating needs for the past 3 years (this being the forth) and find it does a great job heating the house.
    Great stove, we enjoy heating with it and has given us virtually no issues.
    Overnight burn is no problem.
    On -30 deg C (-22 deg F) days we find the stove is basically at it's limit for our home so you may find it to be a bit big, but, personally I'd rather have to open a window than push a stove past it's capacity.
    If you're a little further north than us than the summit might just be perfect for you.
    You could always bump down to a super 27 if you wanted as I'm sure it would heat your home just fine as well.
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