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pallets treated or untreated ?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by kwikrp, Dec 17, 2008.

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  1. kwikrp

    kwikrp Feeling the Heat

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    How do you tell if a pallet has been treated in any way ? I am able to get some to burn but they all look the same to me and was told some may have been sprayed with insecticide, how can you tell I dont want to burn that.

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  2. Vic99

    Vic99 Minister of Fire

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    Fresh, clean looking pallets are generally safe.

    Fairly obvious things to check for, but worth mentioning are large stains and strong chemical odor, especially when the pallet is cut.

    Last year late winter into spring I burned a huge number of pallets just to make it through.

    I have a small creosote stain that will NOT come out of the ceramic glass. I extensively searched the post here, brought the glass to the dealer, and tried nearly everything to get rid of it. I suspect that it is from a bad pallet since I cannot find another explanation. I typically clean the glass 1-2 a week as needed.

    Now I only take pallets that seem to obviously be new construction AND dry (moisture meter).

    Good luck.
  3. madrone

    madrone Minister of Fire

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    One good sign is an "HT" on it somewhere. This stands for "heat treated", which implies that it probably isn't chemically treated as well, as that would be redundant.
  4. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    My guess is that pallets used for international shipments are more likely to treated with pesticide. Look for evidence as to the origin of the pallets.
  5. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    Pallets (wooden)for shipping between countries either get heat treated or fumigated (methyl bromide). Methyl bromide evaporates pretty quick, any absorbed and retained into the wood is probably broken down within two months. They used to use it on golf course lawns and for termites and fire ants and farming until it got banned except for specific uses. (like fumigating). supposedly bad for the ozone layer.

    I would be concerned with pallets that come from certain places in Asia (won't mention any country names) that don't have (better) controls on pesticide use.

    Couldn't say which would be worse, burning the pallets or just handling them, especially lots of them.
    As they age they probably are safer to burn. It's not like they are coated with pcb's and chemicals that are horribly inert.

    But pallets that have been stored in/near or soaked with oil and/or other chemicals would be good to avoid.
  6. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    As for pressure treated wood- the PT wood that I used recently was also stamped HT or KD (heat treated or kiln dried). I assume it wouldn't be, but there it was.
  7. madrone

    madrone Minister of Fire

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    Good to know. I guess I should be careful how I spell assume...
  8. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    Maybe it was KD, and HT is something else? I would assume that they'd KD the wood to stabilize it and prevent warping and splitting, and maybe so it could absorb yummy chemicals. I dunno.
  9. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    I wonder if you could turn a propane torch right on the spot and heat it up. The ceramic "glass" should stand the heat no problem, but once you get it red hot, any organic carbon soot would be burned to a white ash which should easily wipe away.
  10. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

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    Hey Vic99

    <>I have a small creosote stain that will NOT come out of the ceramic glass. I extensively searched the post here, brought the glass to the dealer, and tried nearly everything to get rid of it. <>

    Didja try rubbing compound - the type for autobody work? I've had good results on PyroCeram with it...
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