Refinishing a stove with lard.

woodmiser Posted By woodmiser, Nov 26, 2011 at 7:37 PM

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  1. woodmiser

    woodmiser
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  2. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR
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    That worked out better than I thought it was going to.

    No idea what the poster meant by "This is not a "show" stove, this one works for a living."
     
  3. Scott2373

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    That's fantastic!
     
  4. BrotherBart

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    "Having french fries tonight dear?"
     
  5. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR
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    I bet people would complain less about the break-in fire smells if the stove smelled like a french fry frier.

    Great, now I want french fries...
     
  6. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
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    Lard was what my mother used on the cookstove. She would rub it onto the hot stove with newspaper. Not sure if the newspaper made the difference or not but it sure did put a shine on it.
     
  7. pen

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    That's how I refinish cast iron cookware.

    However, when it's really smoking/baking-in, it ain't smelling like french fries.

    pen
     
  8. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR
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    Don't ruin my dream.
     
  9. Hass

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    Do you think this makes it tacky like cast iron cookware?
    At least some of my seasoned cast iron goodies leave some goo on your fingers when you handle them.
     
  10. pen

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    Not finished or cleaned properly if it's gooey. When baked right in well, it is rock hard.

    pen
     
  11. BrotherBart

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    If you use cooking oil instead of lard you end up with goo.
     
  12. pen

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    I keep lard around at all times (as it should be!), but have used crisco for testing while seasoning and I've found it works just fine also (no stick).

    pen
     
  13. BrotherBart

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    Yeah. I quit using cooking oil and went to Crisco and that was the end of the sticky film of glue in my frying pans. My sister clued me in to that when I was complaining about the gunk and how hard it was to get off of even non-stick pans.
     
  14. cmonSTART

    cmonSTART
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    Wow. That's actually pretty darn cool. I guess that makes perfect sense in terms of cast iron pans, cook stoves, etc.

    My mind is officially blown.
     
  15. stoveguy2esw

    stoveguy2esw
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    i was cringing im not ashamed to say, i helped build that stove , its an 18-TR an exempt unit and quite a successful one we built up into the early 00's (dad still has one in his woodshop) after looking at the whole series of pictures im simply amazed at how great this turned out.


    aint every day i learn somthing in the woodburning business. i did today. great post! rest assured i'll pass this one around the office come monday. thanks for sharing this with us , and thanks again for choosing my product to do it with, that was pretty damned cool!

    BTW, that stove was designed and built to "work for a living" she'll hold up for many years to come
     
  16. cmonSTART

    cmonSTART
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    So will this be a finish option at ESW now?

    Think of it. You could cook bacon and eggs right on your stove.
     
  17. Hass

    Hass
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    Lol my dad always had taught me to fry up some bacon and spread around the fat/grease to season them :)
    I suppose that's not much better.
     
  18. pen

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    Just remember, it will only look this way if it gets hot enough to bake the fat in (read turn it into a layer of carbon). Unless he was able to get that pedestal up to temp, it isn't going to work w/out building a fire in the yard and sticking the whole stove in.

    pen
     
  19. nate379

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    My dog would probably keep burning his tongue on teh stove it a smeared lard on it!
     
  20. btuser

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    Proof that everything is better with bacon.
     
  21. mcollect

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    That is the way blacksmiths finished their ornamental works. BTW don't use bacon as it contains salt and will lead to rusting. Lard works best. For cast iron cooking utensils I use unsalted butter and rub it on with a paper towel but only use a tiny amount and wipe it clean, if you don't it turns to goo.
     
  22. webbie

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    That whole process of "rendering" sorta grosses me out.......I remember when giant dump trucks loaded with the meat cuttings used to be tooling around in Philly! It pained me to think someone was gonna eat that stuff.......

    But if you use the deer or bear fat after you harvest the fella, that's probably OK....
    :coolsmirk:
     
  23. BrotherBart

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    I used to lease trucks to a company that hauled away the by-products from packing plants. In West Texas heat.

    Their main customers were cosmetics manufacturers.
     
  24. webbie

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    In philly they make scrapple out of them (do you know what that is?)
     
  25. woodchip

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    Must admit, if mine had any lard put on it, I'd probably be tempted to follow it up with a couple of steaks ;-)
     
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