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Regency F2400 ashdrawer

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Dungeon Lord, Feb 6, 2011.

  1. Dungeon Lord

    Dungeon Lord New Member

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    Hi guys,

    First post here. I am looking at buying the Regency F2400 and there isn't a dealer very close around me (I live in Japan).

    Is the ash drawer for the legs type (not pedestal) any good? I am hoping not to get too much ash everywhere.

    Any user comments would be great.

    Thanks in advance

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  2. shawneyboy

    shawneyboy New Member

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    I am unfamilaiar with this specific stove but..... many users of other stoves that have ash drawers, like I don't ever use them. Just wanted to throw that out there, don't make a decesion because of an ash drawer, you may not even use it.

    Shawn
  3. Dungeon Lord

    Dungeon Lord New Member

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    True. Buying a stove based on the ash drawer would be silly.

    It is really just the last small point to feel confident on the purchase. I have never owned a wood stove and it isn't something a lot of people have around here. So I like to know what I am getting myself in for as I will be relying on it for warmth in winter.

    BTW, thanks for the reply. I appreciate it.
  4. shawneyboy

    shawneyboy New Member

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    I have heard some people use and really like the ash dragon. You may want to look into that, although perhaps shipping to Japan may be rather expensive. See if they have something local or if you can find someone to fabricate one for ya.

    Shawn
  5. Dungeon Lord

    Dungeon Lord New Member

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    That is an interesting idea. I wonder how bad the ash gets. Sounds pretty bad...

    The Ash Dragon isn't cheap either. I guess you get what you pay for. I will have a think about it.

    THanks again.
  6. Shari

    Shari Minister of Fire

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    You will probably get a lot of discourse regarding the 'need' for an ash pan built into a stove. For me, it was a 'mandatory' item. In my mind having an ash pan means a lot less messing around with the stove - rake the ashes down through the interior grate between loads - in the morning, when the stove is coolest I pull out the ash pan, dump it, put it back in and THEN rake down the ashes from the night before. In other words, I don't rake down ashes just before an ash dump. I dump first which gives me a little more assurance I 'probably' won't have a hot coal mixed in with the ashes.
  7. Dungeon Lord

    Dungeon Lord New Member

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    Sounds smart to me.

    Man, you guys are fast at replying. Thanks!
  8. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    I have no experience with the model, but it has a claimed burn time of 8 hours while having a 2.3 cu ft firebox. Expect real heat production to be under that by about 2 hours. For an overnight burn you can expect enough coals for an easy relight with a stove around 150-200°F. This is not a negative by any means. Just realistic expectations.
  9. Dungeon Lord

    Dungeon Lord New Member

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    You can also cook stuff on top and inside of it right?
  10. jimbom

    jimbom Combustion Analyzer

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    I have seen posts on this. Most empty the ash pan when it fills.

    I like and use my ash drawer. It helps keep the very fine dust out of the house.

    Where I lived in Monzen cho, Iwakuni shi, Yamaguchi ken, the fire watch guy would go by every night in winter just after I drifted off to sleep. He walked the neighborhood with two blocks of wood that he clapped together. The lane was about three feet from my bedroom. Then he would yell out in Japanese, "Make sure fires are out." People always came to the door for money for various things like TV and decorations for festivals etc. I would pay and get my little receipt. When I finally started figuring things out, I realized I was also paying for this guy to wake me up all winter. Must have worked, the neighborhood didn't burn down. And it would have gone quickly had it started.
  11. Dungeon Lord

    Dungeon Lord New Member

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    日本語を読ã‚ã‚‹ã®ï¼Ÿã‚„ã£ã±ã‚Šé•·ã日本ã«ä½ã‚“ã§ã„ãŸã ã‚ã†ã­ã€‚é¢ç™½ã„経験ãŒã„ã£ã±§ã—ょã†ã€‚ã©ã‚“ã ã‘勉強ã—ã¦ãŸã®ï¼Ÿ
  12. Clarks ACE Hardware

    Clarks ACE Hardware Member

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    The ash pan for the "legs" model is quite a bit smaller than the pedestal version. The ash pan will help cut down on ash clouds in the house which is what you're after, but it won't save any steps or time in the cleaning process.

    This is a great stove by the way, expect to see a solid 8 hour burn out of it.
  13. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    Really? For once the stats on a stove are accurate?
  14. Hardrockmaple

    Hardrockmaple Feeling the Heat

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    I know nothing of the stove mentioned, just wanted to say, I would *not* buy a wood stove unless it had a workable ash pan/drawer.
  15. jimbom

    jimbom Combustion Analyzer

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    I took 15 semester hours of Japanese from the University of Maryland. I worked there from 1979 - 1982. I don't remember much Japanese, but at one time I could get by. Worked with construction companies and mostly local people. Many spoke excellent English. I spent from 1970 to 1982 mostly in East Asia and developed the habit of learning all the local language I could cram. Worked out for the best more than once. In Japan, I had a "Russian" type stove and a wood fired ofuro. It was great. Jim
  16. Dungeon Lord

    Dungeon Lord New Member

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    I would probably prefer the pedestal for the ash drawer size and lid that comes with it, but sadly, it looks... well, terrible (to my eye anyway). Thanks for your input.
  17. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack Minister of Fire

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    I've got a Regency 2400 on a pedestal base with the ash drawer, but I find it quicker and easier to remove the ash into a metal pail and a shovel. I just place the pail right up, and slightly into, the stove door and use a short shovel to scoop up the ashes and dump them into the pail. If done while the stove is still a bit warm the residual draft sucks all the ash dust up the chimney and none escapes the stove into the house. Using the ash drawer you have to remove a brick from the bottom of the stove, then remove the metal plug, then rake all the ash down the small hole into the drawer, then pull out the drawer and empty it and replace it, then replace the plug and the brick. You have to be careful to clean around the plug when you put it back in or it might not seal properly.
    Doing it my way with the pail and shovel is a little quicker because you don't have to play with the plug.
    I'm very happy with the stove by the way, it's all I use to heat my 1,500 sq ft house.
  18. Dungeon Lord

    Dungeon Lord New Member

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    Thanks for the tip. Do you cook in the stove too? Do you use only hard wood or pine? I have been told pine and its kind are not good.
  19. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack Minister of Fire

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    I have discouraged any sort of cooking "on" top of our woodstove, only because I know what the surface will look like after a while. Other than the inevitable stains and scratches that will occur there is no reason why you couldn't cook on the top. I have on occasion cooked trout wrapped in foil inside the stove on coals. Best if you place some bricks on the coals to cook stuff on, rather than trying to cook directly on the coals.
    About pine, it's a myth that you shouldn't burn pine, perpetuated by people who want all the pine wood for themselves. ;-)
    My staple firewood is Lodgepole pine, which is a lot denser wood than most other varieties of pine, but any wood can be used as firewood as long as it's properly seasoned and clean. By clean I mean it isn't contaminated with stuff like paint or preservatives, or glue, etc... Milled kiln dried wood, and some cord wood such as dry white pine, have a propensity to burn hot and fast, so you have to be careful to control the burn so you don't over-fire your stove.
    Hope that helps
    By the way, I'm kind of curious, are there many people with wood stoves in Japan? I'm surprised that pine myth made it all the way over there, I thought it was only an Eastern North American thing.
  20. Fsappo

    Fsappo New Member

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    Hey Dungeon Lord, are you a gamer?
  21. Install fire 1

    Install fire 1 Member

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    The F2400 on good wood will do a solid over night burn for sure.

    This stove is a work horse if you run it hard.

    Add the airmate, it lowers clearances and drives the heat forward quite nicely.
  22. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    I have to agree with Shari . . . having my first two stoves with useful ash pans this was one feature I wanted . . . and I really like with my stove. It makes cleaning out the ashes very easy . . . unlike Shari . . . I typically rake the ashes in the morning (done twice a week) and then take out the ash . . . but regardless of when you rake the coals . . . having the ash pan is nice . . . at least with this model.
  23. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Pine is fine . . . no fear. Just make sure it is seasoned.
  24. Dungeon Lord

    Dungeon Lord New Member

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    I am sure it was started by people wanting to sell hard firewood and people who over-fired their stove and then blamed the maker. There aren't many people over here with wood stoves, but I have always loved them so I am trying to get one for my place... fingers crossed.
  25. Dungeon Lord

    Dungeon Lord New Member

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    Yep. Wasn't really keen to use my gaming tag here, but I get really confused by changing names all the time.

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