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rehydrating lumber scraps?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Marty, Sep 12, 2006.

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  1. Marty

    Marty Feeling the Heat

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    Large tub/tank, wood, and a some weight...

    Anybody ever hear of or try to up the moisture content of lumber scraps to safe burning levels?

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  2. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    seems like alot of work.....
  3. Harley

    Harley Minister of Fire

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    I agree... does sound like a lot of work..... if you have to do it, maybe putting it in a damper, cooler area, maybe with some buckets of water next to them, the wood should absorb some of the moisture. I don't think soaking them would be a good idea. Where is the wood stored now? I'm just kind of taking stabs at this, but if outside, maybe a quick soaking with the hose every couple of days, and maybe keep it covered.... you don't want it to get too wet, though.
  4. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    just leave it exposed to rain
  5. Marty

    Marty Feeling the Heat

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    I don't really have any... not more than I couldn't just use it as kindling anyway... just curious.

    I wonder if it would reverse cure over a season, kept wet and uncovered in the shade while your other wood dried under a tarp in the sun... seems a shame not to burn good wood just cause it's too dry... in theory anyway.

    Any way to measure the water content of wood?
  6. BikeMedic2709

    BikeMedic2709 New Member

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    Leave it sit outside on the ground. It will eventually get moist. But the it wont be all that great to heat with. LOL.
  7. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=2757

    I am going to start hitting Harbor and Englander up for commissions.
  8. martel

    martel Member

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    BB you use that one for splits?
  9. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Yep. Cordless drill, small drill bit. Poke a couple of holes and it gives you the good or the bad news.

    The tines can't sink far enough into hardwood without the help. Of course the two hundred dollar ones can't either. They make some megabucks ones that you can hammer into the wood but I already have the drill.
  10. DonCT

    DonCT Minister of Fire

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    I think has got to be the first time someone's wanted wetter wood....
  11. Marty

    Marty Feeling the Heat

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    Nice.
    I Googled it right after I posted the question and saw some in the 100-$300 range and one sold on ebay for $28 but that price seems more realistic for my purposes.
    If only MSG's 'customer of the year' award nominee had known about this process through some sort of pamphlet. :D
    Do you find that samples of a pile of like wood measure out to have about the same water content?
  12. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Yep. Stuff cut at the same time and on the same row of the stack track right at about the same content. Denser crotches higher content and slower drying than the straight grain.
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