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Secondary Burn on Heritage Cartier ???

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by ozzy73, Jan 12, 2010.

  1. ozzy73

    ozzy73 Member

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    I have an older smoke dragon ( non cat / no secondary burn tubes ) and was a little puzzled by what was going on in the stove the other night.

    To my understanding a secondary burn can only occur in stoves with secondary burn tubes.

    Is this a secondary burn ? If yes how can the secondary burn be occurring if there is not air getting into the stove ?

    http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=8673919

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  2. ozzy73

    ozzy73 Member

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    Just noticed the other post below " What is a secondary burn? ". Shoud be under that topic...
  3. fbelec

    fbelec Minister of Fire

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    looks like secondary to me. what stove are you runnin? what year was it made? if there is no secondary air tubes or vents in the top of the box i would say you got yourself a air leak from the door or a crack in the stove. what was the stove temp? if it were around 600 i think i would live with it and be happy. your chimney will love it.
  4. FN_9

    FN_9 New Member

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    I'm not an expert in this and others will chime in, but I'm pretty sure that 2ndary burn will occur when the internal temp of the stove is high enough to ignite the combusitible gases. If you're burning hot enough, this should occur in any stove (i.e. pre EPA stoves). With regard to the lack of supply air - i believe that all stoves allow for some amount of air even when completely closed up with the damper controls.

    in short, keep doing what you are doing and enjoy the show.

    i have an older stove (1980 something) and 2ndary burns occur when it's running at a nice cruising temp.
  5. ozzy73

    ozzy73 Member

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    The stove was manufactured in the 80's ( Heritage Cartier II ). It did last for approx 50 minutes and the stove temp was pegged around 600*F :ahhh:
  6. fbelec

    fbelec Minister of Fire

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    600 is good. that's not to hot for a stove. that's a good temp to run at. if it gets your house to hot then run a smaller amount of wood. make small hot fires like that and you won't have creosote problems.
  7. DocSavage

    DocSavage New Member

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    Hi everyone I am new to this forum, and stumbled over this thread on google.

    I have a heritage cartier 2 in the basement too, This is going to be my first year using it.

    We bought our house in the winter last year and we didn't have any wood to burn.

    I first tought that it was a regular stove but when the insurer came to see it I saw the plate in the back from heritage.

    My problem is the following in the user manuel it states that the second combustion chamber will ignite at 575 but on my thermometer anything over 400 is stated as too hot

    Is there a difference between a magnetic thermometer and probe read and if so of how much is it.

    I have been burning for about 3 week now between around 300 on my thermometer is it too low can i start burning it higher now without danger.

    Sorry I'm a first time stove owner so I'm bit clueless

    Thanks for your time
  8. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    The thermo that you are using was designed as a surface mount pipe (stack) thermo. Ignore the words and use it as a temp gauge. Be aware - it could be erroneous by a bit (like 50-100 deg.).

    Edit - you could always stick it in the oven for a comparison reading.

    And welcome to the forum.
  9. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Yes, that is secondary combustion. Are you sure of the age of the stove? Look on the back for the UL tag to see if there is a mfg. date.. These stoves were made at least through the early 2000s. Though I don't think they are EPA listed, they did have a basic secondary combustion system.

    DocSavage, the thermometer you are using sounds like one with scales on it designed for single-wall flue pipe usages. The temp scales do not refer to stove top temp. Running the stove at 500-600F is fine.
  10. DocSavage

    DocSavage New Member

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    Thanks Jags for the fast answer,

    So the best way to use it would be what fbelec recommended up in this thread?
  11. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    If you are referring to the 600F stove top? Then yes, that is a nice place to be.
  12. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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