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Shingle roof repair

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by guest5234, Nov 5, 2008.

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  1. guest5234

    guest5234 New Member

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    Hi Guys, I have an unusual house in the UK as it is completly wooden even with shingle cedar roof tiles...problem is that at the bottom of the roof tiles where it overlaps the guttering the lath board has gone rotton, it is about one inch by one inch..I am going to replace it but should I coat the recess with creosote before I put the lath back or leave it as it is and just coat the exteriour of the new lath when I put it back.
    Thanks.

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  2. d.n.f.

    d.n.f. New Member

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    Creosote is becoming restricted/illegal in a lot of places in North America especially in places where water contacts. Which is a place where creosote excels. Not a big deal for you but something to think about.
    What about a rain/ice shield underlay (goes on the bottom 3' of your roof and can wrap around)? It is kind of like heavy duty tar paper.
    Have also seen people take the last 1-3' of the shingles out and replace with steel. More of a snow country thing so probably not good for your application. Plus it looks weird.

    What kind of wood? Cedar shakes/shingles are very popular in the rainy N. West of Canada/US and they last a long time (20-30+ years). Pine shakes were in Alberta for awhile and that was a disaster. Roofs lasted less than 10 years. Pine and water, what were they thinking?

    Wooden roof is a dumb idea for anywhere near a forest fire area (again probably doesn't apply to you), and requires a screened chimney cap so your roof doesn't catch on fire from embers.

    I doubt that answered the question.
  3. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    First off, I'd suggest that you might want to look for a UK based construction advice site as well as whatever we say - most of us are Americans, and I suspect we may do things differently in the States...

    That said, my first concern is where is the moisture that rotted out the board coming from? Wood generally doesn't rot unless it's kept pretty steadily damp, and a properly built / maintained house should either keep the wood dry or allow it to dry rapidly when it gets wet...

    That said, I would look at what sort of underlaying tarpaper, felt, or other sealing material might be around that lath, and what sort of shape it's in - does it need replacing? After that's taken care of, I would apply a good coat of whatever sort of water-proofing / wood preserving agent is appropriate for the are (which might be creosote) and make the replacement parts out of pressure treated material.

    Gooserider
  4. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Cedar is meant to breathe. If you seal it or coat it, you trap moisture inside, it doesn't breathe worth a crap and will prematurely rot.
    The old ways are sometimes the best ways.
  5. kjklosek

    kjklosek New Member

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    Neil,

    What are you calling the lath?

    Do you mean the sheathing? The part the shingles are nailed to.

    Or, are you refering to the fascia. The trim board that is nailed to the ends of the rafters?

    If it is the sheathing then slip a new piece in there. Maybe use some spanish cedar or white oak to help with the weather resistence.

    Or you could pull up the last five or six courses and install a metal drip cap and flashing then re-install those shingles.

    Lead and lead coated copper flashing is pretty common where you are. Not cheap, but effective.

    J.P.
  6. guest5234

    guest5234 New Member

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    Thanks for the answer, it was very helpfull and yes I think bitumen roofing felt overlapping and protecting the lathe is a great idea.
  7. guest5234

    guest5234 New Member

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    I have more in common with you guys than those in the UK belive it or not..I am one of very few who have a completly wooden house with a cedar shingled roof and the advise I have always got about the house was on American and Candaian web sites.
  8. guest5234

    guest5234 New Member

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    Thanks Joe, I am going to use some roofing felt to cover the lathe as I replace the rootton lathe, this was obviously not done some years back for whatever reason as the resat of the roof I have noticed has felt protecting the roof.
  9. guest5234

    guest5234 New Member

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    I was advised to pressure wash and treat my cedar roof that has been on for 40 years and in what looks in fair good condition, glad I left them as they are as they have done 40 years with no problem.
    Scaffold was to install my flexable liner and repoint chimney

    [​IMG]
  10. kjklosek

    kjklosek New Member

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  11. guest5234

    guest5234 New Member

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    Stratford Upon Avon, England.
  12. Beanscoot

    Beanscoot Member

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    That's nice scaffolding. I notice that the shingles are mossy except for under the chimney, presumably from the runoff of the chimney flashing (galvanized steel or lead I assume). Zinc strip is commonly placed partly under the highest course of shingles so that it slowly leaches with rain to kill moss below it. It works well.

    Here we have the wood preservative Copper Napthenate, it comes dissolved in kerosene and is painted on wood to protect it. I've used it and it seems good. I've also seen Zinc Napthenate preservative for sale here. I like the former since it has a nice green colour.
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