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Should I Leave The Pilot On?

Post in 'It's a Gas!' started by Todd, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    Dealer says yes, it will keep the bugs out and also keep the corrosion down. Well if that's true why are there new gas stoves that have an auto ignition system with no pilot?

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  2. A1Stoves.com

    A1Stoves.com Minister of Fire

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    it'll also help keep your house warm- leaving pilots on all year is a waste imo
    Bster13 likes this.
  3. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    I killed the pilot on my gas furnace late spring. Did it last year as well with no adverse effects.
  4. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    Well, I can't stand walking by my stove and seeing that little blue flame burning In there when its 90 degrees outside! Maybe I'll just let it go and if I don't like my next gas bill I'll know better next month.
  5. The Maine Stove Guy

    The Maine Stove Guy New Member

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    For what it's worth I think it depends some on your location. We have a lot of customers that are right on the ocean and corrosion from the damp air is a real problem. Leaving the pilot on seems to help. I replace a LOT of pilot assembly's every year and it's almost always on units that the pilot is turned off. I expect in an area that does not have a lot of humidity it wouldn't be a problem.
    Joful likes this.
  6. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    What if you put some desiccant packs in there?
  7. The Maine Stove Guy

    The Maine Stove Guy New Member

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    That would certainly help a lot I expect. That would be a better option than just turning the pilot off and leaving it for sure. Keeping the moisture from building up in the off season will really extend the life of the stove for you.
  8. trafick

    trafick Member

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    I shut my pilot off in the spring - summer. I also shut it off in the fall when the days still get warm but from December to March I usually leave it on. It does put off a little heat and I guess every bit helps.
  9. Bioburner

    Bioburner Minister of Fire

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    I shut ours down and give the pilot assembly a shot of spray oil. Corrosion is a problem with our pilot assembly with high humidity in MN.
  10. blades

    blades Minister of Fire

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    Another thought on pilot on/off debate- if your flue is all masonry keeping pilots on helps prevent acidic leaching of the mortar joints due to condensation. The number one cause of chimney demise now days with the new appliances that use on demand ignition, venting into older flue systems. Demise of a masonry flue system with new appliances is a slow process taking some 10-15 years to show up which is just slightly shorter than the length of time since on demand ignition systems for heating and hot water have been popular ( note this also dependent on your areas humidity factors) It is a bit of a plague in the more northern climates where we see wild temp swings in a 24 hour period. Of the five dwellings I have owned since the 60's 3 have required masonary repair/ and or relining of the flue system due to a lack of that itty bitty heat rise put off by the standing pilots of old. One was a steel system and the other never had a on demand system installed during my tenure. My current dwelling which I built in 1960 developed the leaching problem after apx 10 years of on demand ignition units for heating and hot water.
  11. firecracker_77

    firecracker_77 Minister of Fire

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    I have double wall flue pipe. I turn off the pilot in May....Pilot goes back on in October and stays on for 6-7 months. I am looking forward to re-lighting soon.
  12. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    So are there products that can hold up to the instant on pilot lights?

    I just lit mine, a traditional pilot light that runs 24/7 (grrr). It is off when I don't need the heating system but I guess fortunately the water heater has it's own pilot light to keep the flue in shape.

  13. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    After a couple months of leaving it on I saw little or no difference in my gas bill.
  14. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    Anything I can do to minimize that pilot/Natural gas charge... I'm doing it. :p Bought the house May 1st 2013.

    [​IMG]
  15. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    We always shut ours off on the DV stoves...then again, in a small house (about 850 sq ft) two pilot lights can seem to add to the heat when it's hot out. We did notice the gas bill seemed a little less. Never thought about condensation though. HM.
  16. John Gabel

    John Gabel New Member

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    We turn ours on as soon as it started cooling to the 50's at night. It keeps the moisture down in the unit.

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