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Snow covered wood stacks

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Diabel, Feb 9, 2013.

  1. Diabel

    Diabel Minister of Fire

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    Would you say that wood stacks are still drying/seasoning while completely snow covered. I am hoping to burn that wood next season. I am starting to wonder and get nervous. The wood has been split and stacked summer 2010, but I get soooo much snow at the lake that I just don't know anymore! Granted it is not wet snow....nice and fluffy dry but about 4' of it!!!!

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  2. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy Minister of Fire

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    You will, in all probably, be okay. Maybe they'll be freeze dried.==c Thing is you can't do much about now anyway. Just make sure, come no snow time, the stacks are where the wind a can blow through them and they get lots of sun.;)
    PapaDave likes this.
  3. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    What type of wood?

    Much of my 14/15 stack of birch is plugged with about 4' of drifted snow .
    Sometimes I see some mold forming in the spring but it dries out & is fine if I get it in the shed for the next year.
    (1 year out side then 2 in the shed)
    Birch is notorious for rotting pretty quick if wet or moist.
    Spruce holds up fine.
    Some wood types need to be covered if to be kept for a few years (in wetter climates like here anyway).

    It'll melt in about 2 months ;)
    DSCF0505.JPG
  4. Diabel

    Diabel Minister of Fire

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    Beech, hemlock, sugar maple and lots of white/yellow birch. The plan is to bring leave it there until Sept 2013, then bring it all back to town to a nice dry shed.
  5. Flamestead

    Flamestead Feeling the Heat

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    I'm sure wood completely covered with snow will dry more slowly, if much at all, as compared to covered wood. I've got some of both, and really like the old tin roofing.


    DSC02636wp1.JPG

    DSC02637wp2.JPG
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  6. Diabel

    Diabel Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the pics!
    With my stacks, you can't even see they are there! Good theft protection I suppose.
  7. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Diabel, we used to live where the deep snow was common annually. We, along with many others simply never worried a bit. Your plan sounds good. The dry snow helps but no, there is no drying of the wood during these times. However, what percentage of the year are those stacks covered? My bet is that it is a small percentage. Sleep easy tonight.
  8. Diabel

    Diabel Minister of Fire

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    Thank you Dennis,
    You are the voice of wisdom when it comes to wood supply preparedness!
  9. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    You are welcome. Not so much on the wisdom part. Just try to help people.
    loon likes this.
  10. Diabel

    Diabel Minister of Fire

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    I wonder how many wood burners on here have taken Dennis for real and follow his (the only) protocol when it comes to seasoning?
  11. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Diabel, I know not how many but I can tell you when I came onto this forum, I rarely saw much about how long to dry wood and very few had much to say. I saw the need so just took it on myself to start preaching. One of my greatest compliments was when a couple moderators posted some answers that looked like I had typed them. I also see over and over comments from folks that they did not know anything about this before coming onto this forum. Now they do. This is what keeps me on the forum. If it comes to the point where I can no longer help anyone, some might start asking why I am no longer posting.
    TimJ and Seanm like this.
  12. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    I have - get ahead - way ahead if you can. that way you don't need to worry about snow or anything else because by the time you get to it it will be dry!
    Backwoods Savage and STIHLY DAN like this.
  13. red oak

    red oak Minister of Fire

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    No it's not drying when covered with snow, but like others have said, the snow will be gone soon enough. It'll start drying out again come spring.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  14. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Good plan. Especially the birch & sugar maple. seems the sweet woods rot fast if wet for very long.
    Sugar helps the bacteria grow & eat faster. My theory anyway.
    I've seen birch rounds in a wood shed get punky in a few years, gotta split birch ( water tight bark)
  15. Diabel

    Diabel Minister of Fire

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    I hear you on the birch thing, anything over 2" get split
  16. Vande

    Vande Member

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    I wouldn't worry about the snow on the stack. If it is below freezing then the snow(frozen water) will not be absorbed into the wood. When it is above freezing, it is going to melt and drip away. Maybe some will be effected by the thawing, but not all. I have found that my wood dries quite well in the winter, the relative humidity is quite low, water migrates to dry. Years ago, I spent time hiking and camping in the winter. We would hang out our clothes to dry from the day before, and when we returned to camp while it was significantly below 32 all day, our clothes would be dry.
  17. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    When it thaws out it will melt & drip into the pile, and it will take a long time for it to get out again. I've found ice in piles in May long after winter & the snow has gone.
  18. Diabel

    Diabel Minister of Fire

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    We'll see. I have been spoiled with great wood for the past few seasons...mainly BL/sugar maple and ash. Next year will be a bit lean.... I will start with hemlock then birch then yellow birch/beech/maple. Just worried it will not be ready due to the mounts of snow!
  19. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    +1
    Same here, the N side is the last to thaw .
  20. Vande

    Vande Member

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    I suppose NS is different than NH in terms of weather, but it seems like a large concentration of snow must melt, collect and stay captured in one location to remain in frozen state in May. While it obviously happens, my stacks see enough wind and sun by May to not have this problem.
  21. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    A few thaw & freeze cycles will build up ice inside a pile - at least it does here. That ice can stay there a long time. Stacking off the ground helps, but preventing this is likely the biggest reason I see for top covering.
    HDRock likes this.
  22. Diabel

    Diabel Minister of Fire

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    I might be I trouble next season! By some of the comments.
    Hope not! I will have about 1 full cord of BL left from this year (three yr old)
    I can always mix.
  23. STIHLY DAN

    STIHLY DAN Feeling the Heat

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    If the wood freezes, the cells burst allowing the moisture to escape faster in the summer.
  24. swagler85

    swagler85 Minister of Fire

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    Now you can't be in a place to not help people here. Just not to long ago I didn't know to get years ahead. Thought I was doing just fine. Really is amazing how much you can after you know everything. Wouldn't have learned it if not for Dennis.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  25. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    +1 and keeps the leafs and sticks out

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