Snow Diverter/Dam for Woodstove Chimney Installation

LSaupe Posted By LSaupe, Nov 9, 2008 at 12:31 PM

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. LSaupe

    LSaupe
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 8, 2007
    72
    0
    Loc:
    Southern Adirondacks NY
    Greetings:

    I have recent heard that an external stove pipe chimney should have a snow deflector on the roof side of the installation (to prevent a snow slide from taking out the chimney).

    Are these available from a vendor? If so amyone have a good link?

    Also, are these required by code or is it just a common sense precaution (i.e. would it pass a building inspection in NY state without it)?

    Any thoughts here appreciated.

    Larry S.
     
  2. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 12, 2006
    5,500
    554
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    Is the pipe in a spot where falling snow will hit it? Will the velocity of the snow be great enough to harm it? If so, how about some flashing?

    Matt
     
  3. Burd

    Burd
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 29, 2008
    438
    13
    Loc:
    Bell bell Pa.
    You can find snow deflectors at any roofing supply house
     
  4. Brian VT

    Brian VT
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 30, 2008
    807
    1
    Loc:
    Southern VT
    The Duravent instructions suggest a "splitter" above the flashing in heavy snow areas. They don't supply one but show a sketch of one to be made from sheet metal.
    It's essentially a "dormer" on the uphill side of your chimney. You can see the sketch Fig. 14 in their installation instructions.
     
  5. LSaupe

    LSaupe
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 8, 2007
    72
    0
    Loc:
    Southern Adirondacks NY
    I am in a heavy snow area. Great info. Many thanks.
     
  6. fossil

    fossil
    Accidental Moderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Sep 30, 2007
    10,538
    2,417
    Loc:
    Bend, OR
    You will also see them referred to as "Crickets"...vee-shaped deals a few inches high that are fastend to the roof on the "uphill" side of the chimney with the point of the vee facing up toward the ridge. When snow begins to migrate down the roof, it will be deflected around the chimney. Rick
     
  7. begreen

    begreen
    Mooderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    61,954
    7,925
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
  8. fossil

    fossil
    Accidental Moderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Sep 30, 2007
    10,538
    2,417
    Loc:
    Bend, OR
    Whether or not you need one depends on how much roof there is above the point at which your chimney penetrates, how tall the chimney is above the roof, and just how much snow your area receives. If your chimney is low on the roof, is tall, and you get a lot of snow, then this is an excellent idea. Rick
     
  9. InTheRockies

    InTheRockies
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 15, 2008
    366
    0
    Loc:
    Northern US Rockies
    If you live in a high snow area, that's a good idea. We've had more snow than normal over the past 2 winters. Last year was terrible--we got over 8 ft on the valley floor (some of the mountains got over 30 ft) and there were a number of roofs that collapsed due to snow load. Virtually everyone had to clear their roofs at least once (I was up on mine twice). I've seen these cropping up on a number of roofs this spring and summer. [​IMG]. A number of people with metal chimney pipe have also put up guards like this [​IMG].
     
  10. LSaupe

    LSaupe
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 8, 2007
    72
    0
    Loc:
    Southern Adirondacks NY
    Thanks for all the replis on this. Great information and I will definetly be installing something. Moving roof snow loads of two to three feet are not uncommon where I live. Dont think this chimney would survive long without it.

    Larry S.
     
  11. snowtime

    snowtime
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 31, 2007
    523
    0
    Loc:
    northern BC
    We generally get 30' plus. One of the reasons we are snowed in on most winters. I have a 12-12 pitch and have found that a good strong cricket is the way to go. Just do not make it to small. Ours is 3' at the high spot near the chimney. One other point is to make it very close to the chimney say 3 or 4 inches. This system will prove inadequate if the cricket is not of sufficient size. Do not worry the cricket will look huge on the ground but fine once up on the roof. I have a painted galvanized roof and I built the crickets myself. Remember to fasten the cricket "very" well.
     
  12. fossil

    fossil
    Accidental Moderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Sep 30, 2007
    10,538
    2,417
    Loc:
    Bend, OR
    Larry, good for you for thinking about this now! Rick
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page