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source for liner insulation?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Turner-n-Burner, Sep 25, 2006.

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  1. Turner-n-Burner

    Turner-n-Burner New Member

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    Okay, so I picked up my insert (Hearthstone Clydesdale) and 25' of liner from my dealer. I asked them about insulating the liner, and they don't normally do it - "not required"


    I figure I only want to do this once, and I'd like as good a draft as possible - particularly on those damp spring days when you just want to take the chill off the house...

    So what's the concensus on the forum for liner insulation? 1/4" or 1/2" ? Any brands easier to install than any others?


    Thanks,
    -Dan

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  2. Marty

    Marty Feeling the Heat

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    I bought mine from my dealer.
    Same supplier as my liner, Olympic Chimney supply.
    Found out later I could have saved more than 25% by buying from an insulation supplier in my area.
    Look in your yellow pages under "Insulation Materials"
  3. Willhound

    Willhound Feeling the Heat

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    Dan
    Not sure if I understand what you are asking? Are you saying you want to wrap the liner with 1/4" or 1/2" blanket insulation? Never heard of it or seen it, not even sure I'd want to do so, but maybe the more professional types here can chime in.
    The only way I've seen a chimney liner insulated is by either packing high temp bats around the liner in the top 6 feet or so of a masonry chimney, or if you are putting double wall stainless inside a pre-constructed faux chimney like you see on new house builds these days, then I've seen 1/2" sheet insulation with foil backing applied to the interior of the chimney. Or, I've heard about "Ther-Mix" which I understand is a liquid based insulation that hardens in place.
  4. Willhound

    Willhound Feeling the Heat

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    Oooops. Guess I should have looked around before commenting. I did a search and came up with several different suppliers of the wrap kits you are talking about. Reason I've never seen these here is that I don't beleive they meet our code, therefore the other methods I've mentioned. Still don't know that I like the idea of wrapping the pipe directly, but that's just me. I do have bat insulation packed iin around the top of my liner inside a masonry chimney, but only the top 6 feet or so where temps are a lot cooler on the liner.
  5. Marty

    Marty Feeling the Heat

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    This type of wrap is ceramic fibre rated to 2000° F and backed by foil and steel mesh, so It's pretty safe.
    25' costs a little about $275 retail, about $225 wholesale.
    There is a pic of it in my new install thread:
    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/3307/
  6. Rhone

    Rhone Minister of Fire

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    Your chimney sounds like it should draft nicely at 25' but the Clydesdale seems to love draft. My Clydesdale has a 13-14' chimney and don't have enough. I've ripped out my liner and I'm redoing everything from scratch trying to get as much draft as I can. I opened up my damper area, replaced the lowest section of my liner with round flex (it was oval), sealed up every seam, I purchased a stainless 30 to replace a home-made one my installers put in, removed a leaky device in the liner I didn't need, and purchased an extend-a-flue to increase my chimney height by about 4 feet. Hopefully, that will be enough to have it draft because it's no fun when it doesn't... unfortunately my flue size is too small to fit insulation. So, although I think you're probably fine I still recommend it. It's just nice when you draft. You don't get as much smoke into the living area, and I can't light fires unless it's 45F or less outside. If my house is cold, and I want to go to bed and I look outside and see it's 48F I've tried enough times to know it's not going to work. I set my alarm for 2am, and by that time it's usually abour 44F and I can light my fire. I'd rather be able to start fires when it's at least 50F, maybe 55F outside and do it before going to bed.

    Buddha says the middle path is wisest... and the middle path here is the 1/4" insulation.
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