1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Splice an Extension Cord?

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by velvetfoot, Apr 5, 2007.

  1. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    46,003
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Sounds good foot. To me if done well, it doesn't scream klutz, it says life restored and back to duty. I have a cord with a 5-6 year old splice that is doing fine. Just make sure that the outer insulation wrap stays tight and in good order.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    That's why I use shrink on the repair... The good rubbery mil-spec shrink if properly installed is good and tight, and while it might not pass OSHA, as far as I'm concerned it offers similar strength and protection to the original insulation. I've even been known to get paranoid and put on two layers of shrink over the entire repair, in which case it may even be thicker insulation than the original. This gives one layer over each of the spliced wires, (with soldered splices) then two layers over the repair as a whole, for three layers total... That mil-spec shrink is tough stuff too, when taking apart conections occasionally, I have often found the stock insulation is easier to cut than the shrink.

    Gooserider
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    46,003
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    You'll like marine shrink then Goose. It's tough and has hot-melt glue inside. For a really good seal you can follow with a larger shrink around the entire splice.
  4. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2006
    Messages:
    2,288
    Loc:
    Sunny New Mexico
    The proper way would be:

    Get two sizes of polyolefin heat shrink tubing, one big enough to cover the jacket, the other sized for the individual conductors.
    Cut the cable so you're making a clean start on all three wires, even if only one is broken.
    Strip the jacket back 3", and each wire's insulation 1 inch or so.
    Slip one large piece of heat shrink over each side of the wire, each long enough to cover the repair area plus 1" extra on each end.
    Slip a piece of small heatshrink over one side of each conductor to be repaired.
    Twist a pair of mating wires tightly together and solder them (flux core electrical solder.) For 12 guage you'll need an 800-900 degree iron and some patience... until the solder flows down into the wires, it's not hot enough.
    Use a hairdryer and shrink the tubing over the repaired wire. Make sure no metal is left exposed.
    Repeat the previous three steps for each wire.
    Now slip one of the large heatshrink pieces over the entire repair, and shrink it down. Make sure there's excess on each end over the jacket to act as a strain relief.
    Slip the second large one over the first one and shrink it down.

    That's a repair that is as good as or better than new. May even meet mil spec... :)
  5. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2006
    Messages:
    2,288
    Loc:
    Sunny New Mexico
    Ooops, I see you've already done it. I should have read the whole thread first.
    Never mind.
  6. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    A good summary of the procedure, though I might argue with your suggestion to cut any undamaged conductors. I feel that there is no repair that is as good as the original undamaged insulation... Thus my rule of thumb if I can get shrink on the cord some other way is to carefully disect the cord and examine all wires. I cut and splice any damaged conductors as you stated. Undamaged conductors I make an "S" curve to shorten them. I also cut or tie a knot in the fiber "strength member" cord so that there will be no strain on the spliced conductor(s) no matter how I'm making the repair...

    Gooserider
  7. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2006
    Messages:
    2,288
    Loc:
    Sunny New Mexico
    Agreed, and yes that call could go either way. If the cord will be exposed and subject to lots of use then, in my mind, the integrity of the jacket becomes very important. And I've not had luck with shrink tape used that way.

    That's a good one, Goose.
  8. John_M

    John_M Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Messages:
    614
    Loc:
    Central NY
    BeGreen and Gooserider +1.

    Here are the products I use for all electric and electronic repairs: http://www.marinco.com/view/96/catalogs

    Marinco/Ancor wiring, connectors, crimpers, etc are engineered as a repair "system" for maximum effectiveness in marine and other harsh environments. Their products are among the best and among the most expensive available. I've used their Adhesive Lined Tubing (ALT) to protect butt joints subjected to salt water submersion and in 15 years of boating it has never leaked. I have four or five of their crimpers, including one for heavy gauge battery cable. They are terrific.

    John_M
  9. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,467
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    butt connectors - good crimpers - 33+ electrical tape and rubber tape.

    I've tried them all in the marine environment and the only splices I've taken apart 20 years later that water hadn't gotten to was the above combo.
  10. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2007
    Messages:
    2,023
    Loc:
    Western CT
    Good info for a 3.5 yr old thread...
  11. Mcbride

    Mcbride New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    202
    Loc:
    Mcbride BC Canada

    Bingo. :)
  12. fbelec

    fbelec Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2005
    Messages:
    1,659
    Loc:
    northern massachusetts
    there is a splice kit for underground splicing of uf cable.{underground romex} it looks like a small football. about 5 inches in length. it's strong and waterproof. it sells for about 15 or 20 bucks at a electrical supply house. it may look strange but so will a wad of electrical tape.
  13. PJF1313

    PJF1313 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2009
    Messages:
    389
    Loc:
    Pine Barrons, L.I., NY
    Make sure that you get the right one - there is 2 different types

    DBY or DBR - is a 30volt and LOWER
    DBY6 or DBR6- is a 600 volt and lower - THIS is one you need

    DB = Direct Burial
    Y/R = Wire Nut Size (3M Nynut [Yellow / Red ] ) the correct size wire nut you will need to make the connection
    6 = Maximum voltage (no number = 30; 6= 600 Volt)

    The DBY is meant for irrigation and low-voltage lighting. If you use that, instead of the "6" you will have problems -
    maybe not right away, but in 2-5 years, it WILL fail (don't ask me how I know!)

    The lower voltage ones are a white color connector body
    The high voltage ones are more of a cream/tan color.

    The "Y" (or "R") is the size of the wire nut and body. A "Y" wire nut will fit inside of a "R" body; but not the other way around
    (the "Y" [yellow] is physically smaller then the "R" [Red] wire nut/splice)
  14. fbelec

    fbelec Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2005
    Messages:
    1,659
    Loc:
    northern massachusetts
    the one that i'm talking about is the color of a pumpkin but shaped like a football with ridges. the inside is brass insert the wire tighten the screws down onto the wires. no wire nuts. and super water tight.
  15. snowleopard

    snowleopard New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,494
    Of course there's a need for a three-foot extension cord--and the best way to find that use is to discard the cord. Takes about a month, usually . . .

Share This Page