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Stacking on a hill

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Narf, Nov 5, 2012.

  1. Narf

    Narf New Member

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    I recently bought a ranch house equipped with a wood stove in the basement and a fireplace on the main level. The front yard is level, as is about 20 yards off the back of the house. Then there is a 6 foot retaining wall fallowed by a wood lot on a 30 degree slope. I would like to stack my wood behind the retaining wall, but foresee problems with blocked wind and stacks falling over. Anyone have any experience stacking wood on a hill? And what are your thoughts on wood behind a the retaining wall? My other option is the side of my house, but my neighbor has an awesome garden and I really don't want to block the view. Thoughts?
    Thanks!
    bogydave likes this.

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  2. kennyl70

    kennyl70 New Member

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    can you stack it long ways down the hill? if so a post for support would hold the long run of wood. I think u can make it work.
  3. Narf

    Narf New Member

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    I like that idea. I honestly hadn't even thought of it. I hear it's best to keep the wood off the ground. What are some methods for doing this and is it necessary?
  4. kennyl70

    kennyl70 New Member

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    if you can get a few pallets they r the best to stack on. if not, u can use saplings, just cut them and lay them down in a row and stack the wood on them. i even use old barn tin, i lay it down and stack on top of it. whatever u can find to not have direct ground contact. keeping your wood off the ground is very important, otherwise u lose the bottom row to rot. and thats just time and energy of yours wasted.
  5. cptoneleg

    cptoneleg Minister of Fire

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    30* is a pretty good slope, but I do stack mine down or up hill on 4x4 landscape timbers, and level the timbers so so. Also put T post on each end with a small rope from post to a split in center of stack, and this is 1/3 cord of wood SDC10525.JPG
  6. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Off the ground is a must !
    Many here use pallets. Usually easy & free to scrounge.

    I double row with a space between the rows for air

    You gotta stack wood on your place that works best for you.
    Off the ground, A single row, In an open field running N/S so sun hits both sides in a windy area would be golden.
    I don't have that so I do what works for me on my property & the wife says it OK too :)
    cptoneleg and kennyl70 like this.
  7. kennyl70

    kennyl70 New Member

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    bogy is right what works best for you. but off the ground...... yes.
  8. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

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    I use pallets and did something similar to cptoneleg, I dont think you'd want to stack it against the wall as the wind wouldnt get to it on both sides and thats what really dries the wood.
  9. blacktail

    blacktail Minister of Fire

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    No trees to stack between? I lay whatever I have (treated lumber, old decking boards, scrap wood, pecker poles) between my cedar trees and stack my wood on it.
  10. red oak

    red oak Minister of Fire

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    I stack on a hill similar to yours. I use longer logs or saplings to keep the wood off the ground. I make the stacks so that they lean against each other, and it's been years since any have fallen over. Some of the stacks I want to lean uphill, so I use thicker logs on one side. So it can be done it just takes a bit of planning with your stacking.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  11. ColdNH

    ColdNH Minister of Fire

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    My stacks are on a hill, not 30 degrees tho, probably closer to 15-20 degrees. what I did was cut up 1 pallet into L's and then cut up another pallet in half, this gave a level stacking surface on a hill (if that made any sense at all), You can see the pallets in the bottom of this picture

    IMG_20111220_073558.jpg
    osagebow and NYLife like this.
  12. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Probably the cheapest method and it works great. The poles under the wood are just saplings we cut in the woods. When the wood is gone you can reuse the poles. Not as ugly to have stacked or laying around as pallets after the wood is gone.

    Ends-3.JPG Wood-2009c.JPG
    cptoneleg likes this.
  13. cptoneleg

    cptoneleg Minister of Fire

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    Yep I agree the only reason i'm using the 4x4s is I got lots of them free;lol
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  14. kennyl70

    kennyl70 New Member

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    Free 4x4's r always a good thing

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